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Lonzo Ball

American basketball player

Lonzo Anderson Ball (born October 27, 1997)[1] is an American professional basketball player for the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association (NBA). A point guard, he played college basketball for one season with the UCLA Bruins, earning consensus first-team All-American honors before the Los Angeles Lakers selected him with the second overall pick of the 2017 NBA draft. He was named to the NBA All-Rookie Second Team in 2018.

As a high school senior at Chino Hills High School in 2016, Ball was awarded multiple national high school player of the year honors, and led his team, alongside his brothers LiAngelo and LaMelo, who are both current professional basketball players, to an undefeated record, as well as a national championship. As a college freshman in 2016–17, he led the nation in assists and broke the UCLA record for the most assists in a season. Ball also won the Wayman Tisdale Award as the top freshman in the nation. As an NBA rookie with the Lakers, his playing time was limited by shoulder and knee injuries, and he was sidelined for much of his second season after an ankle injury. He was traded at the end of the season to the New Orleans Pelicans in a trade package for Anthony Davis. He played two seasons with the Pelicans before joining the Bulls in a sign-and-trade deal.

Early life

Ball was born in Anaheim, California, part of the Los Angeles metropolitan area,[1] to LaVar and Tina Ball, who were both former college basketball players.[2] The 6-foot-6-inch (1.98 m) LaVar played at Washington State for one season before transferring to Cal State Los Angeles, where the 6-foot-1-inch (1.85 m) Tina played for four years.[3][4] A two-sport athlete, LaVar also played American football professionally for the London Monarchs in the World League of American Football.[1][5] After college, LaVar played for the practice squads of the New York Jets and Carolina Panthers.[6]

Ball started playing basketball at the age of two.[1] He idolized LeBron James, who he began following around age six and when James was a first-year NBA player with Cleveland.[7] Ball grew up with his younger brothers, LiAngelo and LaMelo. Until they reached high school, the trio played together on teams coached by their father.[3] Ball played basketball at Chino Hills High School in Chino Hills, California.[2] As a junior in 2014–15, he averaged 25 points, 11 rebounds, 9.1 assists, 5 blocks, and 5 steals.[8] In his senior year, he led the school to a 35–0 record and a state title, and the Huskies were ranked the consensus No. 1 team in the nation.[9][10] His younger brothers, junior LiAngelo and freshman LaMelo, were also on the team, as well as his cousin Andre.[11][12] Ball averaged a triple-double with averages of 23.9 points, 11.3 rebounds, and 11.7 assists per game.[2] He received national honors, including the Naismith Prep Player of the Year,[13][14]Morgan Wootten National Player of the Year,[15]USA Today Boys Basketball Player of the Year,[16] and Mr. Basketball USA.[17]

By the end of his senior year, Ball was rated as a consensus five-star recruit.[18][19] He was ranked No. 4 overall in the 2016 class by both Rivals.com and ESPN, while Scout.com ranked him at No. 7.[20][21] In November 2015, he signed a National Letter of Intent to attend the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and play for the Bruins.[22][23]

College career

As a freshman in 2016–17, he was one of 50 players named to the preseason watch list for the John R. Wooden Award, given annually to the top college player in the nation.[24] Ball's vision and passing skills led UCLA's rise up the national rankings,[25] as he and fellow freshman T. J. Leaf helped the Bruins bounce back from a 15–17 record from the year before to a 31–5 record.[26][27] Ball led the nation in assists and transformed the Bruins into the top scoring offense in the country.[28] In his first collegiate game against Pacific, he had 19 points, 11 assists, and eight rebounds.

Later in the year, Ball was named the MVP of the Wooden Legacy tournament, after he led UCLA to a win over Texas A&M in the championship game.[29] He remained on the Wooden Award list in midseason, when he was also joined by Leaf, as UCLA was one of just five schools with two candidates on the list.[30]

On February 4, 2-17, in a 107–66 blowout win against the Washington Huskies, Ball had 22 points, six rebounds, and five assists.[31] With close to two dozen NBA executives in attendance, the game matched Ball against the Huskies' Markelle Fultz, who were among the nation's top point guards and projected to be among the top picks in the 2017 NBA draft.[31][32] Fultz scored 25 points in an even matchup between the two freshmen.[31] In the Bruins' regular season finale, Ball had a career-high 14 assists in a 77–68 win over Washington State, when he also broke Gary Payton's 30-year-old Pac-12 season record for assists by a freshman.[33][34] UCLA was seeded No. 3 in the NCAA Tournament, and won their opening game 97–80 over Kent State. Ball had 15 points and three assists to surpass Larry Drew II's school record for most assists in a season.[35] In the second round, he came close to a triple-double with 18 points, seven rebounds, and nine assists in a 79–67 win over Cincinnati.[36] All of his assists came in the second half, when UCLA overcame a three-point halftime deficit after scoring a season-low 30 points in the first half.[37] The Bruins were eliminated in the Sweet 16, losing 86–75 to Kentucky. Ball had 10 points, eight assists, and four turnovers in the loss, while Wildcats point guard De'Aaron Fox scored 39 points for an NCAA tournament freshman record. Ball strained his hamstring in the game but played through it and was limping in the second half. Ball did not offer it as an excuse for being outplayed.[38][39] After the game, he announced that he would declare for the 2017 NBA draft, where he was generally projected to be a top-3 pick.[38]

For the season, Ball averaged 14.6 points, 7.6 assists, and 6.0 rebounds. He was the only player in the nation to average at least 14 points, six assists, and six rebounds, and was the first player in the conference since California'sJason Kidd in 1993–94 to average at least 14 points, seven assists, and six rebounds.[40][41] His 274 assists also passed Kidd (272) for the second-most in a season by a Pac-12 player, behind only Ahlon Lewis (294) of Arizona State in 1997–98.[42] Ball made 55.1 percent of his field goal attempts and 41.2 of his three-point attempts to become the first NCAA Division I player since 1992–93 to make at least 70 percent from the 2-point range and 40 percent from the 3-point range.[43][44] He was a unanimous first-team All-American, earning honors from the Associated Press,[45]United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA),[46]National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC),[47] and Sporting News.[48] Additionally, he was awarded the Wayman Tisdale Award by the USBWA as the top freshman in the nation.[49] Ball was the only freshman that year to be a finalist for the Wooden Award, Naismith College Player of the Year, and Oscar Robertson Trophy.[28][46][50] He was also voted Pac-12 Freshman of the Year, named first-team All-Pac-12 along with teammates Leaf and Bryce Alford, and received honorable mention for the Pac-12 All-Defensive Team.[41][51]

Professional career

Los Angeles Lakers (2017–2019)

Rookie season (2017–18)

Ball was selected with the second overall pick of the 2017 NBA draft by the Los Angeles Lakers.[52] It was the third straight year they had the No. 2 pick.[53] He and Brandon Ingram, their second overall pick from the previous year, headlined a young core for the Lakers.[54]D'Angelo Russell, their No. 2 pick in 2015, was traded days earlier, partly to clear the way for their newly drafted point guard. Lakers president of basketball operations Magic Johnson billed Ball as "the new face of the Lakers."[55] During the 2017 NBA Summer League in Las Vegas, Ball was named the league MVP after averaging 16.3 points, 9.3 assists, 7.7 rebounds, 2.5 steals, and 1.0 blocks per game. He had two triple-doubles, the first in Vegas since 2008 and the first ever in Vegas by a rookie.[56][57] He had four games with 10 or more assists, becoming the first in league history to have more than 10 assists in more than one game; his 9.3 assist average was also a league record.[58][59]

As a rookie in 2017–18, Ball played in 52 games, missing 30 games due to shoulder and knee injuries.[60] In the second game of the season on October 20, 2017, he scored a then career-high 29 points, to go along with 11 rebounds and nine assists in a 132–130 win against the Phoenix Suns, falling one assist shy of becoming the youngest player to notch a triple double in NBA history.[61] In the following game, he had eight points, eight rebounds, and 13 assists in a 119–112 loss to the New Orleans Pelicans, becoming the youngest player in franchise history to get at least 10 assists in a game.[62] On November 11, he recorded 19 points, 13 assists, and 12 rebounds in a 98–90 loss against the Milwaukee Bucks, becoming the youngest player at the time to achieve a triple-double at the age of 20 years and 15 days old, breaking James' record by five days. Leading up to the game, Bucks' coach Jason Kidd, who Ball is often compared to, had called it "a stretch" to compare the two since it was too early in Ball's career.[63] Ball, who had been struggling with his shooting,[64] made over 50% of his field goals in a game for the first time in his career.[65][66] On November 19, he recorded his second triple-double with 11 points, 16 rebounds, and 11 assists in a 127–109 win over the Denver Nuggets. It was the most rebounds by an NBA rookie guard since Steve Francis had 17 in 1999–2000.[67] He also joined fellow NBA rookie Ben Simmons, as well as Magic Johnson, Connie Hawkins, Art Williams, and Oscar Robertson as the only players to record multiple triple-doubles within the first 20 games of their NBA careers.[68]

Ball missed the team's Christmas game after spraining his left shoulder in the previous game against the Portland Trail Blazers.[69] He returned after missing six games, playing in five games before spraining the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in his left knee against the Dallas Mavericks on January 13, 2018. Originally, he was expected to be sidelined for one to three weeks.[70] Ball was selected to play in the Rising Stars Challenge during NBA All-Star Weekend, but withdrew because of the injury.[71] He returned after the All-Star break after missing 15 games. On February 23, he played 17 minutes and had nine points, seven rebounds and six assists in a 124–102 victory against the Mavericks. It was the first game he played all season that he did not start. He was also on a minutes restriction, and the Lakers held him out of their following game to limit his back-to-back games during his return.[72][73] Ball missed the final eight games of the season due to a knee contusion.[74] He ended the season with averages of 10.2 points, 7.2 assists and 6.9 rebounds, but made only 36 percent of his field goals.[75] He was named to the NBA All-Rookie Second Team,[76] while fellow rookie teammate Kyle Kuzma exceeded expectations and earned first-team honors.[75]

2018–19 season

Ball upset during game in 2018.

On July 17, 2018, Ball underwent an arthroscopic surgery on his left knee to repair a torn meniscus.[77] During the offseason, the Lakers signed the four-time NBA Most Valuable Player LeBron James, which shifted the spotlight away from Ball.[75] They also signed veteran point guard Rajon Rondo to mentor and compete with the youngster. A week before camp, Lakers coach Luke Walton stated that Ball would be eased back and not participate in full-contact practices initially.[74]

Ball's added bulk made him better on defense,[7] and he became one of the Lakers' most dynamic defenders during the season as he picked up point guards full-court to create turnovers in the backcourt.[75] On offense, he had to adjust to playing off the ball more with James often handling the ball.[75][78] On December 15, in a 128–100 win against the Charlotte Hornets, the duo became the first teammates to achieve a triple-double in the same game since Jason Kidd and Vince Carter did it in 2007, with Ball posting 16 points, 10 rebounds, and 10 assists, while James had 24 points, 12 rebounds, and 11 assists. The last Lakers teammates to accomplish the feat were Johnson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in 1982.[79] It was Ball's third triple-double of his career and his first in over a year.[75] On January 19, 2019, he had a career-high seven assists in a quarter to help the Lakers build a 13-point lead over the Houston Rockets after the first period.[60] In the third quarter, he collided with the Rockets' James Ennis III and suffered a Grade 3 left ankle sprain, which included a torn ligament.[80][81] Ball left the game with 11 assists in 22 minutes and the team up by 18 points, but the Lakers lost the game in overtime 138–134.[60][80] He had suffered two other ankle injuries earlier in the season, but had been able to play in all of the team's first 47 games.[82] Since Walton called him out for being passive after a 108–86 loss against the Minnesota Timberwolves, he had been averaging 13 points, 6.4 rebounds and 8.4 assists with nearly two steals over seven games before the injury.[83] Ball was selected again for the Rising Stars game, but he was ruled out again because of his ankle injury.[84] In late February, he traveled to Ohio to potentially undergo surgery. However, this surgery was not authorized by the Lakers, so the team informed him that his contract could be voided if he proceeded, and successfully talked him out of it.[85] Originally expected to be sidelined for four to six weeks,[80] he was shut down for the rest of the season in March.[86][87]

New Orleans Pelicans (2019–2021)

On July 6, 2019, the Lakers traded Ball, Ingram, Josh Hart, the draft rights to De'Andre Hunter, two first-round draft picks, a first-round pick swap and cash to New Orleans in exchange for All-Star Anthony Davis.[88] Ball made his debut for the Pelicans on October 22, registering eight points, five rebounds, and five assists in a 130–122 overtime loss to the defending champion Toronto Raptors.[89] On December 29, he hit a then career-high seven three-pointers, and scored a season-high 27 points, to go with 10 rebounds, and eight assists in a 127–112 win over the Rockets.[90] On January 18, 2020, he recorded his first triple-double of the season with 18 points, 10 rebounds, and 11 assists in a 133–130 loss to the Los Angeles Clippers.[91] On March 3, he matched his then career-high seven three-pointers, while recording 26 points and eight assists in a 139–134 loss to the Timberwolves.[92] He also made seven three-pointers the following day, finishing with 25 points, 11 rebounds, and six assists in a 127–123 overtime loss to the Dallas Mavericks.[93] From December 2019 to March 2020, in a 45-game span, he averaged 12.7 points, 7.3 assists, and 6.7 rebounds while shooting 39.2% from three.[94]

Heading into the 2020–21 season, Ball was at his healthiest.[95] New Pelicans coach Stan Van Gundy placed him in a 3-and-D role, which he had never played before.[96] On January 29, 2021, Ball matched his then career-high seven three-pointers, and scored a season-high 27 points, in a 131–126 win over the Bucks.[97] On April 5, Ball set a new career-high eight three-pointers, while matching his season-high 27 points and registering nine assists in a 122–115 win over the Rockets.[98] On May 1, Ball matched his career-high eight three-pointers while recording a career-high 33 points, alongside 11 rebounds and eight assists in a 140–136 OT win against the Minnesota Timberwolves.[99] On May 4, Ball matched his career-high 33 points in a 108–103 win against the Golden State Warriors.[100] He ended the season with career highs in scoring (14.6) 3-point percentage (37.8%), field goal percentage (41.4) and free throw percentage (78.1). In his new role, his assist average dropped to 5.7 per game, near the level he posted while playing alongside LeBron James with the Lakers. Ball became a restricted free agent during the offseason.[96]

Chicago Bulls (2021–present)

On August 8, 2021, Ball was traded to the Chicago Bulls in a sign-and-trade deal.[101]

Career statistics

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

NBA

Regular season

Year Team GPGSMPGFG%3P%FT%RPGAPGSPGBPGPPG
2017–18L.A. Lakers525034.2.360.305.4516.97.21.7.810.2
2018–19L.A. Lakers474530.3.406.329.4175.35.41.5.49.9
2019–20New Orleans635432.1.403.375.5666.17.01.4.611.8
2020–21New Orleans555531.8.414.378.7814.85.71.5.614.6
Career 21720432.1.397.353.5605.86.41.5.611.7

College

Year Team GPGSMPGFG%3P%FT%RPGAPGSPGBPGPPG
2016–17UCLA363635.1.551.412.6736.07.61.8.814.6

Player profile

Ball used to have an unorthodox jump shot whereby he moved the ball from his left hip to the left of his forehead. He rotated his right elbow in toward his chest until it reached a 45-degree angle, at which point he shot the ball towards the basket.[102][103][104] He preferred to shoot jumpers while moving towards his left.[102][104][105] This led to Ball averaging only 31% shooting from three in his two seasons with the Lakers.[106] Heading into the 2020–21 NBA season, videos of Ball's new shooting form emerged. He has been shooting into a more conventional form with the ball squared up to his forehead and averaged a career-high 37.5% shooting from three in his first season with the Pelicans.[107][108][109]

Ball began shooting in games from 40 feet (12 m) deep when he was a pre-teen.[104] In college, he shot three-pointers from beyond the NBA line, which is 4 feet (1.2 m) longer than the 19-foot-9-inch (6.02 m) college line. His go-to shot with time expiring was a step-back 3-pointer from deep.[110]

Awards and honors

NBA
College
High school
Ball making a pass at the 2016 McDonald's All-American game

Endorsements

Ball began his pro career using sports apparel from his father LaVar's Big Baller Brand instead of signing with any of the major apparel companies. His father had insisted that he not sign with a company unless they agreed to license merchandise from Big Baller Brand.[113] In May 2017, Big Baller Brand announced the release of Ball's first shoe, the ZO2.[114] The $495 price tag on the shoe sparked wide criticism from celebrities and on social media, in regard to its potential quality in comparison to competing brands such as Nike and Adidas as well as Ball's lack of star power. In response to his critics, LaVar tweeted on May 4, "If you can't afford the ZO2S, you're NOT a BIG BALLER!"[115] It was later revealed that despite not being a founder of the company, Lonzo owned 51% of the Big Baller Brand, while his father owned 16.4% of the business and both his mother and Alan Foster, co-founder of Big Baller Brand, owned 16.3% of the business.[116] On April 6, 2018, Jordan Crawford became the first player besides Ball to wear the ZO2s during a game.[117]

On December 20, 2017, Ball was announced as the logo for the Junior Basketball Association (JBA), a league his father LaVar planned to establish for high-school basketball players who have finished high school but want an alternative option to the NCAA. The logo of the JBA is an outline of Ball.[118]

In March 2019, Ball told ESPN that he had cut his ties with BBB's manager and co-founder Alan Foster, accusing him of enriching himself through Ball's business and personal finances. In particular, he stated that $1.5 million of his personal money had gone missing. In addition, the Lakers showed concerns for the quality of BBB's shoes – believing it was a potential factor in his ankle injuries. Shortly afterward, Ball stripped references to BBB from his social media pages, changed his avatar to a childhood photo of himself wearing a Nike-branded T-shirt, permanently covered up his BBB tattoo, and posted a photograph of himself on Instagram with the caption "Moving on to bigger and better #MyOwnMan" [sic].[86][119] Ball and his family have also mentioned the idea of folding the Big Baller Brand altogether in the aftermath of Alan Foster's firing.[120]

Music career

Ball is a rap music enthusiast; in his spare time he writes lyrics on his phone.[121] He has frequently gone to a studio to record music.[122] He has said that he would be a rapper if he was not an NBA player.[123]

In September 2017, Ball released his first rap single, "Melo Ball 1", an ode to his youngest brother, LaMelo.[124] During that same month, he released the song "ZO2", a dedication to his own brand of shoes. The following month, Ball released another rap single titled "Super Saiyan", which is a nod to the anime and manga series Dragon Ball Z. In the track, he compares himself to Goku, the main protagonist of DBZ.[125] On February 15, 2018, Ball and his father would participate in the Lip Sync Battle as competitors.[126] That same day, Ball released his debut album, Born 2 Ball, under the name Zo. The album would be released under the Big Baller Music Group, a subsidiary of the Big Baller Brand, run by a close friend of his father.[127] In March, Born 2 Ball peaked at No. 42 on Billboard'sIndependent Albums chart and No. 13 on its Heatseekers Albums chart.[128][129]

In 2020, Ball competed on the fourth season of The Masked Singer as "Whatchamacallit". He was eliminated on week 8 alongside Dr. Elvis Francois as "Serpent".[130]

Discography

Albums

  • 2018: Born 2 Ball
  • 2020: BBA (Bounce Back Album)

Singles

Personal life

In February 2017, Ball's mother Tina suffered a stroke and was hospitalized for two months.[131]

Ball has been in a long-term relationship with Denise Garcia, whom he met in high school. They have a daughter named Zoey Christina.[132] Ball and Garcia split up in summer 2018.[133] Ball and Garcia reconciled in October 2020.[134]

In August 2017, Ball and his family premiered in their own Facebook Watch reality show, Ball in the Family.[135]

References

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  2. ^ abcdFlores, Ronnie (April 25, 2016). "Mr. Basketball 2016: Lonzo Ball". CalHiSports.com. Archived from the original on April 26, 2016. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  3. ^ abStephens, Mitch (March 26, 2016). "The Architect: Father of the Ball brothers speaks about growth of Chino Hills". MaxPreps.com. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  4. ^Parrish, Gary (July 30, 2015). "The Ball family -- coming to a basketball court (and TV) near you". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on April 26, 2016. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  5. ^"Tina Ball, Lonzo's Mother: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know". Heavy.com. March 24, 2017. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  6. ^Cimini, Rich (March 27, 2017). "That time LaVar Ball was a 'cocky' nobody on Jets' camp roster". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  7. ^ abCacciola, Scott (December 25, 2018). "Lonzo Ball Strives to Be a Point Guard Fit for a King". The New York Times. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  8. ^Gardner, Michelle (November 25, 2015). "Talented Ball brothers bring entertaining brand of basketball to Inland Empire". Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  9. ^Jordan, Jason (March 30, 2016). "McDonald's All American Lonzo Ball is finally proven, now he's focused on fun". USA Today. Archived from the original on April 26, 2016.
  10. ^Chau, Danny (June 1, 2016). "Be Like Steph?". The Ringer. Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  11. ^Conor, Ryan (January 18, 2016). "Lonzo Ball, UCLA commit, wows at Hoophall Classic alongside brothers LiAngelo and LaMelo". The Springfield Republican. Archived from the original on March 24, 2016. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  12. ^Halley, Jim (December 19, 2015). "With three brothers and a cousin, it's a whole new Ball game for No. 2 Chino Hills". USA TODAY. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  13. ^Meyer, Jerry (March 10, 2016). "Lonzo Ball wins Naismith Trophy". 247 Sports. Retrieved March 24, 2016.
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  21. ^"Lonzo Ball, 2016 Point guard - Rivals.com". n.rivals.com. January 7, 2016. Retrieved January 7, 2016.
  22. ^Powers, Shad (January 2, 2016). "ALL-USA Watch: Is Chino Hills' Lonzo Ball the most complete player in nation?". USA Today. Archived from the original on March 24, 2016.
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  24. ^Bolch, Ben (November 15, 2016). "UCLA basketball report: Steve Alford looking for leadership". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 15, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  25. ^Giles, Matt (December 9, 2016). "UCLA's Lonzo Ball Is A Unique, Must-Watch Star". FiveThirtyEight. Archived from the original on January 7, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  26. ^Plaschke, Bill (March 17, 2017). "Dynamic freshman duo again carry the Bruins to victory". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 18, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  27. ^Boone, Kyle (April 6, 2017). "Lonzo Ball says he'd rather be a Laker than be taken No. 1 overall in NBA Draft". CBS Sports. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  28. ^ abNguyen, Thuc Nhi (March 19, 2017). "Lonzo Ball named finalist for Naismith Trophy". Los Angeles Daily News. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  29. ^"UCLA finishes strong to beat Texas A&M for the Wooden Legacy title". LA Times. November 27, 2016. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  30. ^Brown, C. L. (January 11, 2017). "Maryland's Melo Trimble is only holdover from '16 Wooden Award Midseason Top 25". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  31. ^ abcBolch, Ben (February 4, 2017). "Battle of star freshmen goes as advertised, but UCLA's Ball gets more support". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 5, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
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  33. ^Bolch, Ben (March 4, 2017). "Bryce Alford gets emotional in sendoff before UCLA's win over Washington State, 77-68". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 5, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  34. ^King, Jay (March 5, 2017). "2017 NBA Draft watch: Lonzo Ball provides more evidence -- Boston Celtics lucky to have a good pick coming". MassLive.com. Retrieved March 10, 2017.
  35. ^Bolch, Ben (March 17, 2017). "UCLA surges to win over Kent State with a flashy finish". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 18, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  36. ^Plaschke, Bill (March 19, 2017). "Bruins have a Ball while disposing of the Bearcats". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 20, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  37. ^Nguyen, Thuc Nhi (March 19, 2017). "Sweet! Lonzo Ball leads UCLA past Cincinnati in NCAA Tournament". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on March 20, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  38. ^ abForde, Pat (March 25, 2017). "How De'Aaron Fox ended Lonzo Ball's college career and lifted Kentucky to the brink of another Final Four". Yahoo Sports. Archived from the original on March 26, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  39. ^Kilgore, Adam (March 25, 2016). "De'Aaron Fox's record-breaking Sweet 16 placed him among Kentucky's recent greats". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on March 26, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  40. ^Norlander, Matt (March 29, 2017). "Sour end to NCAA Tournament doesn't change incredible season Lonzo Ball had". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on April 17, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  41. ^ abcBolch, Ben (March 6, 2017). "UCLA's Lonzo Ball is Pac-12 freshman of the year and one of three Bruins on first team". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 7, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  42. ^Fowler, Clay (March 23, 2017). "Lonzo Ball actually realizing the Jason Kidd comparison". Inside UCLA. Archived from the original on April 17, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  43. ^Bontemps, Tim (June 21, 2017). "For Lonzo Ball, talent isn't an issue heading into the NBA draft. Daddy issues are". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on November 1, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  44. ^Shelburne, Ramona (May 15, 2017). "Speak It Into Being". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on June 22, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  45. ^"Mason earns Consensus All-America First Team distinction". Salina Post. March 29, 2017. Archived from the original on April 22, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  46. ^ ab"USBWA Names Men's All-America Team, Oscar Robertson Trophy Finalists" (Press release). U.S. Basketball Writers Association. March 13, 2016. Archived from the original on March 14, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  47. ^Fowler, Clay (March 24, 2017). "UCLA's Lonzo Ball keeps collecting accolades". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on March 26, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  48. ^DeCourcy, Mike (March 6, 2017). "Sporting News 2017 college basketball All-Americans". Sporting News. Archived from the original on March 6, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  49. ^Bolch, Ben (March 16, 2017). "UCLA teammates see two sides of freshman guard Lonzo Ball". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 17, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  50. ^Brown, C. L. (March 28, 2017). "Lonzo Ball, Frank Mason III named to the Wooden Award All-American Team". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on March 28, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  51. ^Fowler, Clay (March 7, 2017). "Lonzo Ball, TJ Leaf, Bryce Alford named first-team All-Pac-12". Inside UCLA. Archived from the original on May 6, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  52. ^"Lakers Draft Lonzo Ball with Second Overall Pick – Los Angeles Lakers". National Basketball Association.
  53. ^Ramirez, Joey (May 16, 2017). "Lakers to Pick Second Overall at 2017 Draft". NBA.com. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  54. ^Beacham, Greg (June 23, 2017). "Magic Johnson calls Lonzo Ball 'new face of Lakers' and expects retired jersey one day". NBA.com. Associated Press. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  55. ^Ganguli, Tania (June 23, 2017). "Lonzo Ball is introduced as a Laker with the highest of expectations". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  56. ^"Los Angeles Lakers rookie Lonzo Ball named MGM Resorts NBA Summer League Most Valuable Player". NBA.com. July 17, 2017. Retrieved November 19, 2017.
  57. ^Youngmisuk, Ohm (July 18, 2017). "Lakers rookie Lonzo Ball named summer league MVP". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 19, 2017.
  58. ^Youngmisuk, Ohn (October 7, 2017). "After superlative summer, Lonzo Ball heads to starry Vegas stage". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on October 10, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  59. ^Ramirez, Joey (July 17, 2017). "Lonzo Ball Named Summer League MVP". NBA.com. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  60. ^ abcGanguli, Tania (January 19, 2019). "Lakers blow 21-point lead, fall to Rockets 138-134 in OT". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  61. ^Ramirez, Joey (October 20, 2017). "Lonzo Lights Up Suns In Season's First Win". NBA.com. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  62. ^Kaskey-Blomain, Michael (October 22, 2017). "Ball becomes youngest in Lakers history with 10 assist game". 247Sports.com. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  63. ^Youngmisuk, Ohm (November 12, 2017). "Lakers rookie Lonzo Ball becomes youngest ever to get triple-double". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  64. ^Oram, Bill (November 9, 2017). "Lonzo Ball's shooting woes continue as Lakers fall to Wizards". Orange County Register. Archived from the original on November 12, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  65. ^Isaga, J. R. (November 12, 2017). "Lonzo Ball passes LeBron James as youngest in NBA history to record a triple-double". Rappler. Archived from the original on November 12, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  66. ^Nathan, Alec (November 9, 2017). "Lonzo Ball Flirts with Triple-Double in Lakers' Loss to John Wall, Wizards". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on November 12, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  67. ^Ganguli, Tania (November 19, 2017). "Lonzo Ball has another triple-double to lead Lakers to victory over Nuggets". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 20, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  68. ^Pincus, Eric. "LaVar Ball, Luke Walton Have Vastly Different Approaches to Developing Youth". Bleacher Report.
  69. ^"Luke Walton has 'no target' for Lonzo Ball's return after star rookie misses Christmas showcase". The Orange County Register. December 25, 2017. Archived from the original on December 26, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  70. ^Ganguli, Tania (January 27, 2018). "Lakers shed light on Lonzo Ball's injury". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 28, 2018. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  71. ^Ganguli, Tania (February 14, 2018). "Lonzo Ball expects to return to Lakers lineup Feb. 23 against Dallas". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 15, 2018. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  72. ^Ganguli, Tania (February 23, 2018). "Julius Randle's triple-double leads Lakers to defeat of Mavericks in Lonzo Ball's return". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 24, 2018. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  73. ^Ganguli, Tania (February 24, 2018). "Lakers look to retain defensive intensity after lapses before All-Star break". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 25, 2018. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  74. ^ abYoungmisuk, Ohm (September 19, 2018). "Luke Walton: Lakers 'won't rush' Lonzo Ball (left knee) back". ESPN.com. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  75. ^ abcdefOram, Bill (December 24, 2018). "'A star in his role' — The paradox of Lonzo Ball in the shadow of LeBron". The Athletic. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  76. ^"Donovan Mitchell, Ben Simmons lead 2017–18 NBA All-Rookie first team". NBA.com. May 22, 2018. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  77. ^"Lonzo Ball Medical Update". Los Angeles Lakers.
  78. ^Lowe, Zach (January 18, 2019). "Ten things I like and don't like, including Draymond, Kawhi, Lonzo". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  79. ^McMenamin, Dave (December 16, 2018). "Twin triple-doubles 'pretty special' for LeBron James, Lonzo Ball". ESPN.com. Retrieved December 16, 2018.
  80. ^ abcGanguli, Tania (January 20, 2019). "Lakers' Lonzo Ball to miss 4-6 weeks with ankle sprain". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 21, 2019.
  81. ^Tanguli, Tania (March 8, 2019). "Lakers' Lonzo Ball might miss rest of season; LeBron James' minutes to be monitored". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  82. ^Rude, Jacob (January 19, 2019). "Lakers News: Lonzo Ball exits game vs. Rockets with ankle injury". USA Today. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  83. ^Kamentzky, Brian (January 22, 2019). "Four questions about Lonzo Ball, his ankle injury and eventual Lakers return". The Athletic. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  84. ^Tanguli, Tania (January 29, 2019). "Lakers' Lonzo Ball concerned by possible Anthony Davis deal". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  85. ^Charania, Shams (April 12, 2019). "Charania: Magic's sudden departure is still baffling, but he was clearly over the job and all of its sideshows". The Athletic. Retrieved May 31, 2019.
  86. ^ abShelburne, Ramona; Lavigne, Paul (March 23, 2019). "Lonzo axes pal over allegations $1.5M is missing". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  87. ^"Reports: Lonzo Ball shut down for rest of season". NBA. March 9, 2019. Retrieved March 9, 2019.
  88. ^"Lakers Acquire Anthony Davis" (Press release). Los Angeles Lakers. July 6, 2019. Retrieved July 7, 2019.
  89. ^"Pelicans vs. Raptors - Game Summary - October 22, 2019". ESPN.com. October 22, 2019. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
  90. ^"Ball's career-high 7 3s helps Pelicans past Rockets, 127-112". ESPN.com. December 29, 2019. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
  91. ^"Pelicans' Lonzo Ball: Triple-double against Clippers". CBS Sports. January 19, 2020. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
  92. ^"Beasley, Russell lead Timberwolves past Pelicans, 139-134". ESPN.com. March 3, 2020. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
  93. ^Botkin, Brad (March 5, 2020). "Lonzo Ball ties career high with seven 3-pointers made, continues to blossom into player Lakers envisioned". CBSSports.com. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
  94. ^Rude, Jacob (December 3, 2020). "Lonzo Ball believes he is 'triple-double threat every night,' primed for breakout season". USA TODAY. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  95. ^Clark, Christian (December 3, 2020). "Pelicans' Lonzo Ball hoping to follow Brandon Ingram's blueprint in possible 'prove-it' year". NOLA.com. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  96. ^ abLopez, Andrew (May 17, 2021). "Lonzo Ball, set to be restricted free agent, says he 'would love' to return to New Orleans Pelicans". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 18, 2021.
  97. ^Botkin, Brad (January 29, 2021). "Lonzo Ball ties career high with seven 3-pointers after his name pops up in trade rumors". CBS Sports. Retrieved February 3, 2021.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonzo_Ball
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Create Player Profiles

Creating a 3x3 player profile allows athletes to accumulate and track their ranking points among other 3x3 competitors in the United States.  Individual 3x3 ranking points feed into the overall country 3x3 participation points that USA Basketball needs to qualify for international competitions.  By creating your player profile, you play an integral role in helping the United States qualify for Olympic Games, Youth Olympic Games, FIBA 3x3 World Cups and more!

Player profiles are a requirement for any participant in a FIBA-endorsed event, including a 3x3 qualifier and the national championship. Follow the steps below to create your profile and properly compete in officially endorsed FIBA 3x3 tournaments.

STEP 1: On the FIBA 3x3 Planet website select the blue “Sign Up” box on the right side of the page.

STEP 2: Enter in the required personal information and create a unique password login.

STEP 3: Once all fields are filled in and the terms and agreement are accepted, click the SIGN UP TO FIBA 3X3 button at the bottom of the page.

STEP 4: Following registrations, players will receive a verification email from FIBA 3x3 to the email address entered on the signup page.

STEP 5: Open the email and click on the link to confirm your player profile.  Your player profile registration is not complete until you open and confirm the link sent to your email address.

Once you’ve created and confirmed your player profile, you can begin to accumulate ranking points from the FIBA 3x3 endorsed tournaments in which you participate.

All 3x3 basketball inquiries should be emailed to [email protected]

Sours: https://www.usab.com/3x3/3x3-basketball/create-player-profiles.aspx
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NCAA Basketball Recruiting Guidelines: Get College Coaches to Notice You

What skills are needed to play basketball in college? And what do college coaches look for in recruits? Whether an athlete is a perimeter player or post player, this section lays out the different requirements needed to compete at the college level, from NCAA Division 1 to JUCO programs. When student-athletes know where they fit in best, they can create a realistic list of target colleges and improve their chances of connecting with college coaches. 

What do coaches look for in college basketball recruits? 

College coaches look at a variety of factors when determining an athlete’s ability. Here are the most important ones:

  • Height and frame. The first is the most obvious: physical characteristics, like height and body frame, athleticism and strength. In NCAA Division 1 men’s basketball, the average basketball player height was just under 6’5” and the most common height listed was 6’7”. Basically, they want power players who can make an impact on the court.
  • Technical ability. That being said, at the collegiate level, every athlete will be fast, athletic and strong, so coaches also thoroughly evaluate technical skills. For example, can the recruit protect the ball, or shoot with the right footwork and release point? Bottom line: coaches don’t want to bring on student-athletes who need to be taught the fundamentals.
  • Basketball IQ. More importantly, coaches will determine a recruit’s “basketball IQ” and this is where position-specific skills come into play. Can perimeter players successfully drive the game and control the pace? Do post players read the right defensive rotations? Basketball IQ also includes situational awareness of the game. For example, if the clock is winding down and the game is tied, do athletes know to hold onto the ball until the last shot, instead of forcing a shot early? It also means being aware of how many time outs and fouls both teams have throughout the game. Players who are technically sound, can read the game and execute on the fundamentals will stand out.
  • Academics. Lastly, there are aspects outside of athletics that can truly set recruits apart. Academics, especially at the Division 3 level, are extremely important to college coaches. High grades and test scores speak to an athlete’s discipline, leadership ability and even time management skills.

Of course, what coaches look for also depends on their program’s specific needs. Some schools might invest more in developing a tall, athletic post player, while others highly value a smaller player who has raw talent, polished skills and strong instincts. In many cases, college coaches will turn to JUCO teams to find stronger and more developed talent compared to high school student-athletes. 

Establishing relationships with college coaches is the best way to fully understand their recruiting needs. But another quick way is to visit a team’s roster. Look at which athletes are graduating versus how many underclassmen are in certain positions and compare athletic history to see which positions coaches are recruiting and what key stats they look for.  

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What basketball skills are needed to play at the college level?

When compiling their lists of top recruits, college coaches evaluate three athletic factors: physical ability, fundamentals and basketball IQ. They seek out players who are conditioned, technically sound and have a thorough understanding of the game and strong instincts. They also want to coach athletes who have the potential to improve. That’s why playing nationally and against other high-level recruits is a popular way to gain exposure. Here is a quick overview of the types of players each division recruits:

Division 1 basketball skills: These recruits are ranked nationally and are included in top lists, such as ESPN Top 150, Rivals and Scout. They have elite ball handling and defensive skills and are the best players on their high school and club teams. Simply put—they are the top recruits across the country. Typically recruited through their AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) club team, these athletes receive interest and verbal offers from college coaches early in the process during the summer after sophomore year. They’re awarded top accolades, including All-State honors, and start on varsity all four years.

Division 2 basketball skills: These players have mastered the fundamentals and are considered one of the top players on their high school and club team. They have control on the court and will continue to develop under a collegiate training program. They’ve received awards like All-Region, All-District and All-Conference. Top NCAA Division 2 programs make verbal offers to these athletes at the beginning of their junior year.   

Division 3 basketball skills: These players have some club and varsity experience, earning them accolades, such as All-Area and All-Conference. They have the fundamentals nailed down and may need to continue to work on other parts of their game, whether it’s rebounding, defense, etc. A bulk of these recruits will receive offers after the summer of their junior year and into senior year.

NAIA basketball skills: These basketball recruits will look similar to some Division 2 prospects. They have varsity experience and played with a high-level club for two to three years. They’ve earned awards, such as All-Area and All-Conference. In a collegiate training program, they will continue to get stronger and improve their technical ability. These recruits can receive offers during their junior year and into their senior year as well. 

JUCO basketball skills: JUCO basketball prospects aim to fine tune their skills before transferring to a four-year institution. They are utility players and benefit from competing in a post high school setting. This level is a great opportunity for athletes to focus on core fundamentals, while working on getting stronger and faster, before going on to play at the highest level.

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Average men’s basketball player height by position and level

Tier 1Tier 2Tier 3Tier 4
PositionD1 and Top D2D2 and Top D3 / NAIAD3 / NAIAJC
PG6’2”+6’1”+5’10”+5’9”+
SG6’3”+6’2”+6’0”+5’10”+
SF6’5”+6’4”+6’3”+6’3”+
PF6’7”+6’6”+6’5”+6’4”+
C6’9” +6’8”+6’7”+6’6”+

Average men’s basketball player height by position

  • Avg. point guard height: 5’11”
  • Avg. shooting guard height: 6’1”
  • Avg. small forward height: 6’4”
  • Avg. sower forward height: 6’6.5”
  • Avg. center height: 6’7.5”

In NCAA Division 1 men’s basketball, the average basketball player height is just under 6’5” and the most common height listed is 6’7”.

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Men’s basketball point guard recruiting guidelines 

Top D1 / Top JC

  • Height: 6’2”+
  • Club Experience: Plays at the highest level in AAU, qualifying for national tournaments and elite events across the country. Ranks nationally on lists such as Rivals, Scout and ESPN Top 150. High profile player who is usually recruited through AAU as an underclassman.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter all four years of high school. Earned several top accolades, such as All-State, All-Region and All-Area honors. Best player on the team.

Low D1 / Top D2 / Top NAIA

  • Height: 6’1”+
  • Club Experience: Three to four years of AAU experience, playing on high level teams that compete nationally. Gets college coach exposure at club summer tournaments.
  • High School Experience: Three to four years as a varsity starter, earning awards such as All-Conference and All-Region. One of the top athletes on the team.  

Low D3 / Low NAIA

  • Height: 5’10”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter as an upperclassman, possibly earning some accolades such as All-Area or All-Conference. 

Low D3 / Low JC

  • Height: 5’9”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: One to two years of varsity experience. 

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Men’s basketball power forward recruiting guidelines

Top D1 / Top JC

  • Height: 6’7”+
  • Club Experience: Plays at the highest level in AAU, qualifying for national tournaments and elite events across the country. Ranks nationally on lists such as Rivals, Scout and ESPN Top 150. High profile player who is usually recruited through AAU as an underclassman.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter all four years of high school. Earned several top accolades, such as All-State, All-Region and All-Area honors. Best player on the team.

Low D1 / Top D2 / Top NAIA

  • Height: 6’6”+
  • Club Experience: Three to four years of AAU experience, playing on high level teams that compete nationally. Gets college coach exposure at club summer tournaments.
  • High School Experience: Three to four years as a varsity starter, earning awards such as All-Conference and All-Region. One of the top athletes on the team. 

Low D3 / Low NAIA

  • Height: 6’5”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter as an upperclassman, possibly earning some accolades, such as All-Area or All-Conference. 

Low D3 / Low JC

  • Height: 6’4”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: One to two years of varsity experience.

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Men’s basketball center recruiting guidelines 

Top D1 / Top JC

  • Height: 6’9”+
  • Club Experience: Plays at the highest level in AAU, qualifying for national tournaments and elite events across the country. Ranks nationally on lists such as Rivals, Scout and ESPN Top 150. High profile player who is usually recruited through AAU as an underclassman.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter all four years of high school. Earned several top accolades, such as All-State, All-Region, and All-Area honors. Best player on the team.

Low D1 / Top D2 / Top NAIA

  • Height: 6’8”+
  • Club Experience: Three to four years of AAU experience, playing on high level teams that compete nationally. Gets college coach exposure at club summer tournaments.
  • High School Experience: Three to four years as a varsity starter, earning awards such as All-Conference and All-Region. One of the top athletes on the team. 

Low D3 / Low NAIA

  • Height: 6’7”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter as an upperclassman, possibly earning some accolades such as All-Area or All-Conference. 

Low D3 / Low JC

  • Height: 6’6”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: One to two years of varsity experience.

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Men’s basketball shooting guard recruiting guidelines 

Top D1 / Top JC

  • Height: 6’3”+
  • Club Experience: Plays at the highest level in AAU, qualifying for national tournaments and elite events across the country. Ranks nationally on lists such as Rivals, Scout and ESPN Top 150. High profile player who is usually recruited through AAU as an underclassman.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter all four years of high school. Earned several top accolades, such as All-State, All-Region and All-Area honors. Best player on the team. 

Low D1 / Top D2 / Top NAIA

  • Height: 6’2”+
  • Club Experience: Three to four years of AAU experience, playing on high level teams that compete nationally. Gets college coach exposure at club summer tournaments.
  • High School Experience: Three to four years as a varsity starter, earning awards such as All-Conference and All-Region. One of the top athletes on the team. 

Low D3 / Low NAIA

  • Height: 6’0”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter as an upperclassman, possibly earning some accolades such as All-Area or All-Conference.  

Low D3 / Low JC

  • Height: 5’10”+
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: One to two years of varsity experience.

Back to Top ^

Men’s basketball small forward recruiting guidelines

Top D1 / Top JC 

  • Height: 6’5”
  • Club Experience: Plays at the highest level in AAU, qualifying for national tournaments and elite events across the country. Ranks nationally on lists such as Rivals, Scout and ESPN Top 150. High profile player who is usually recruited through AAU as an underclassman.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter all four years of high school. Earned several top accolades, such as All-State, All-Region and All-Area honors. Best player on the team.

Low D1 / Top D2 / Top NAIA

  • Height: 6’4”
  • Club Experience: Three to four years of AAU experience, playing on high level teams that compete nationally. Gets college coach exposure at club summer tournaments.
  • High School Experience: Three to four years as a varsity starter, earning awards such as All-Conference and All-Region. One of the top athletes on the team. 

Low D3 / Low NAIA

  • Height: 6’3”
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: Varsity starter as an upperclassman, possibly earning some accolades such as All-Area or All-Conference. 

Low D3 / Low JC

  • Height: 6’3”
  • Club Experience: Some AAU experience playing locally, although it is not necessary.
  • High School Experience: One to two years of varsity experience.

Back to Top ^

How to get ranked in basketball 

Star ratings are a quick and easy way to convey a recruit’s level of talent to college coaches. In men’s basketball, 5-star athletes are the best recruits in the country and have outstanding athleticism far beyond their peers. Prospects who are considered the best player on their club or high school team are typically considered 4-star athletes. Student-athletes who show dominance on the court but have a few areas to improve on are usually labeled as 3-star athletes. Lastly, 1- and 2-star recruits have potential to compete at the college level and after some training and development, could become reliable starters. 

It’s important for recruits to gauge their level of talent so they know which programs they qualify for. There are a couple of ways to receive a star rating. First, they can ask their high school or club coach to help assess their skill set and research college team rosters to see where their talent aligns. Another way is to have a third-party, like NCSA, use their expertise and knowledge of the college landscape to personally evaluate the recruit.

Back to Top ^

Sours: https://www.ncsasports.org/mens-basketball/recruiting-guidelines

Basketball player profile

What Parents are Saying

"Our son was determined to make the high school basketball team.  He only played a few years of park district basketball and did not make the junior high team.  He went to a summer camp for the high school team and we all realized how much ground he needed to make up.  We found Coach Elliot at Power Through Basketball and from day one we saw improvement.  Coach Elliot instilled confidence in our son and honed in on exactly what he needed to improve, coached him in the core competencies and he never looked back.  Five months later, our son not only made his freshman team but the coaches commented that he was a totally different player from the summer! We are so grateful to Elliot for all he has done and continues to do with our son!"

~Yvonne on individual training for her son, Adam.

"Coach Elliot knows how to motivate and instruct players. He is able to pinpoint workouts to the skill level needed for a range of abilities. Elliot developed the right work out at the right time for our son. We are very happy with the structure, skills, and services Coach Elliot is able to provide even under difficult circumstances."

~ Greg on Zoom training for his son, Quentin.

"PTB provided our son an opportunity to turn his interest in basketball into a passion.  With skill building, team work and personalized coaching, we have seen our son's skill set and love for the game of basketball grow.  Coach Elliot provides a challenging, yet differentiated experience for his players, all while creating an environment for kids of all skill sets to thrive!  PTB is a great place for your player to take their basketball experiences to a new level!"

~ Angelina & Louie on small group training for their son, Anthony.

"Coach Elliot's training approach has helped our children not only improve their skills but also their overall confidence in themselves.  His energy is contagious and strives to make each session count!"

~ Marty on small group training for his sons, Micah & Noah

Sours: https://powerthroughbasketball.com/player-profile/
Player Profiles: Stephen Curry

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Sours: https://www.bball-index.com/

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