Kalashnikov firearms

Kalashnikov firearms DEFAULT

WO1999005467A1 - Automatic weapon 'kalashnikov assault rifle' - Google Patents

Automatic weapon „Kalashnikov Assault Rifle'

The invention relates to hand automatic firearms.

Known 7.62 mm AK-47 Kalashnikov assault rifle (see Manual on firing, 7.62 mm AK Kalashnikov assault rifle, M. DOSAAF Publishing House, 1 969) has a receiver, a barrel with cartridge chamber and a rifled part, a bolt support with a bolt, a trigger and firing mechanism with a firing trigger, firing hammer and autosafety and an unfolding butt.

Known 7.62 mm improved AKMS Kalashnikov assault rifle with folding butt (see Manual on firing. 7.62 mm AKM and AKMS Kalashnikov assault rifle. M. Military Publishing House of the Ministry of Defence of the USSR, 1 971 ) taken as the prototype features a receiver, a breech locking mechanism containing a turning bolt with a firing rod placed in the bolt support installed on rails of the receiver and having a rear lug interacting with the firing hammer, a trigger and firing mechanism containing a hammer and a sear of autosafety, a gas-escape mechanism with a gas piston the rod of which is installed in the hole of the bolt support, a folding butt and a barrel with a rear-sight bed comprising a cartridge chamber and a rifled portion.

The shortcomings of this model are low reliability, failure of the rifle when it is used in extreme climatic and non-standard conditions, relatively low accuracy of fire, insufficient operational characteristics. The object of the claimed invention is to increase reliability and operational characteristics of the rifle.

To solve the problem the assault rifle features a receiver, a breech locking mechanism comprising a turning bolt with a firing pin placed in the bolt support installed on rails of the receiver and having a rear lug interacting with the firing hammer, the trigger and firing lock comprising a hammer and a sear of autosafety with sear notch, a gas-escape mechanism with a gas tube and a piston the rod of which is installed in the hole of the bolt support, a folding butt with retainers of firing and stowed positions and a barrel with a rear-sight bed comprising a cartridge chamber and a rifled portion.

The novelty of the claimed device is that the bolt support is made in such a way that it can interact in the front position with the tapered supporting surface of the receiver; the rear lug of the bolt support has such length which prevents contact of the firing hammer with the firing pin when the bolt support recoils; the rod is placed in the bolt support in such a way that it allows for limited angular displacement, and the gas tube is equipped with a lug contacting the slot of the rear sight bed.

The rod of the gas piston is inserted into the hole of the bolt support with the help of threading with clearance. The sear of autosafety is equipped with a sear notch of hand reloading in the form of a platform on the sear placed at a distance from the path of the bolt support providing contact of the bolt support with the firing hammer; the platform of the automatic sear notch of the sear is made at a distance from the path of the bolt support providing a clearance between the bolt support and the firing hammer.

Inside the butt there are reinforcing ribs which form a trap for accessory box which is closed by a spring-loaded turning cap installed in such a way that interaction of the pusher and the retainer of the stowed position is allowed.

The gas escape tube is spring-loaded with respect to the rear-sight bed in the direction of the muzzle end.

In the rifled portion of the barrel transition from the rifling land to the bottom of groove is made in the form of two adjoining radii and a tangent located perpendicularly to the plane passing through the bore line and the centre of the rifling land. In the barrel between the conic taper of lands and the rifled portion an additional conic section is made with the length of LL = (4...6)L, where L is the sum of the lengths of support cone of the cartridge chamber and conic taper of the lands.

Combination of the proposed features of the claimed automatic weapon has considerably increased reliability and operational characteristics of the unit.

The essence of the invention is illustrated by the following drawings:

Fig. 1 General view of the assault rifle; Fig. 2 View A in Fig. 1 , the bolt support in the front position in contact with the lug of the receiver;

Fig. 3 gas-escape mechanism;

Fig. 4 cross-sectional view G-G in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 firing hammer in contact with the rear lug;

Fig. 6 firing hammer on the sear notch of the hand reloading of the automatic sear;

Fig. 7 firing hammer on the automatic sear notch of the automatic sear;

Fig. 8 plastic butt with the receiver (cross-section);

Fig. 9 butt, cross-section B-B in Fig. 8;

Fig. 1 0 butt, cross-section P - P in Fig. 8;

Fig. 1 1 butt, magnification D in Fig. 8;

Fig. 1 2 barrel (cross-section);

Fig. 1 3 side view of the rifling in the barrel, cross-section E-E in Fig. 1 2;

Fig. 1 4 notβ f( in Fig. 1 3; and Fig. 1 5 note M in Fig. 3.

The claimed automatic weapon (Fig. 1 ) contains a receiver 1 to which the barrel 2 is attached at the front and a folding plastic butt 3 at the back. On the barrel a rear-sight bed 4 and a gas chamber 5 are installed; between them a gas tube 6 is placed. In the receiver (Fig. 4) on rails 7 the breech locking mechanism is installed (Fig. 3) comprising a turning bolt 8 with a firing pin 9 placed in the bolt support 1 0. The bolt support has a rear lug 1 1 ; in the hole of the bolt support a rod 1 2 with a piston 1 3 is fixed with the help of threading with clearance. At the side the bolt support has a tapered supporting platform 1 4 (Fig. 2), on the receiver a lug 1 5 with a reciprocal tapered platform 1 6 is made. The gas tube has a lug 1 7 down at the back which fits into the slot 1 8 of the rear-sight bed 4 and is spring- loaded by spring 1 9 in the direction of the muzzle end. Inside the receiver a trigger and firing mechanism is placed (Fig. 6) containing a firing hammer 20 and an autosafety with a sear 21 featuring hand reloading sear notch in the form of a platform 22 and an automatic sear notch in the form of a platform 23 (Fig. 7). To the receiver 1 (Figs. 8, 9) with the help of an axle 24 the butt 3 is fixed on a hinge. It comprises a hollow plastic case 25, a buttplate 26, a pusher 27 with a lug 28 which contacts the retainer of the stowed position 29. Inside the butt case reinforcing ribs 30 (Fig. 1 0) are made which form a trap 31 for the box 32 with accessories. The box is spring-loaded by a spring 33 and rests against a turning cap 34 the lower lug 35 (Fig. 1 1 ) of which contacts the reciprocal lug 36 of the pusher 27. The side recess 37 (Fig. 9) on the outer surface of the butt is made in the form of a seat to house the night-sight leaf 38 fixed on the receiver 1 . In the rear part of the receiver a spring-loaded P -shaped retainer of the firing position of the butt is placed. The barrel 2 of the rifle (Fig. 1 2) comprises a cartridge chamber 40 with a supporting cone 41 and a rifled portion comprising a land conic taper 42, an additional conic area 43 and a cylinder portion 44. The length of the additional conic area is LL = (4...6) . (Ls + Lc), where Ls is the length of the supporting cone and Lc is the length of the conic taper of lands.

The rifled portion of the barrel is a profile with rifling and lands (Figs. 1 3, 1 4) . Transition between them comprises „ab" portion with the radius r , „bc" portion with the radius r2 and „cd" portion which is tangent n to radius r which is normal to surface S passing through the bore axis and the centre of the land; d is the land diameter and dR is the rifling diameter.

The automatic weapon operates in the following manner. To load the rifle it is necessary to pull the bolt support 1 0 backwards and release it abruptly. When the bolt support is pulled backward ist rear lug 1 1 cocks the hammer 20 which engages the sear notch of hand reloading 22 of the sear 21 of autosafety at a distance from the path of the bolt support which results in interference K between the hammer and the bolt support. When the firing trigger is pressed a shot takes place and powder gases actuate the bolt support via the piston 1 3 with the rod 1 2 and throw it back. During the backward movement the bolt support cocks the hammer again; the hammer turns and engages the sear notch 23 located at a distance from the path of the bolt support forming a clearance L between the hammer and the bolt support. Due to that, when the bolt support counterrecoils it passes over the hammer freely without touching it which provides for higher reliability of operation. When the hammer is cocked by the rear lug 1 1 it never contacts the firing pin 9 because a clearance „ π „ (Fig. 5) is provided due to specially selected length, and the firing pin does not push the cartridge from the cartridge case seat before the due time which eliminates loss of the cartridge.

When the bolt support 1 0 takes the front position its supporting platform 14 tapered under the angle β (Fig. 2) strikes the reciprocal tapered platform 1 6 of the lug 1 5 of the receiver. In this process the bolt support moves to the left and presses itself to the left rail 7 of the receiver. The piston 1 3 of the rod 1 2 of the bolt support enters the gas chamber 5 and taking up the clearance in the threaded joint with the bolt support turns at the proper angle compensating for errors in the gas chamber installation on the barrel and eliminating the skewness of the bolt support.

In the process of shooting the gas tube 6 fixed by the log 1 7 in the slot 1 8 and spring-loaded by the spring 1 9 of the rear-sight bed 4 does not make any inertial movements.

In the process of shooting the bullet cuts into the rifle lands at the initial moment; the additional conic area 43 promotes a smoother, more uniform cutting-in of the bullet reducing the specific pressure of the bullet on the lands. All that promotes smoother defomation of the bullet according to the form of the lands and increases the service life of the barrel. Availability of the curved transition surface from the lands to the rifling „abc" formed by radii ^ and r2 , and a linear section „cd" along the tangent allows for better filing the rifling by the bullet jacket thus preventing powder gas leakage and increasing stability of the bullet muzzle velocity. The plastic butt 3 can be folded from firing position to stowed position and vice versa. To put the butt from the firing position to the stowed position one should press the pusher 27 protruding from the hole of the buttplate 26; the pusher 27 moves in the cavity of the butt case 25 and by its lug 28 acutates the retainer 29 of the stowed position and releases the retainer form gear with the side wall of the buttplate 26. After that one should turn the butt around the axle 24 and put it into the firing position. To put the butt into the stowed position one should press the retainer of the firing position 39 and turning the butt around the axle 24 put it into the stowed position. As the result of this the retainer 29 of the stowed position engages the side edge of the buttplate 26 and by its tooth fixes the butt in the stowed position. When the butt is folded the night-sight leaf 38 is placed into the pocket 37 on the outer surface of the butt. To withdraw the box 32 with accessories one should energetically press the cap 34 of the buttplate 26 with a finger; the cap will turn and open the hole in the buttplate. Thanks to the spring 33 the box will withdraw from the hole formed by the reinforcing ribs 30 in the cavity of the butte case 25. The spring-loaded cap 34 will turn back to the initial position; to do this the lower lug 35 of the cap interacting with the lug 36 of the pusher 27 will move the pusher to the backward position.

The claimed invention completely solves the aimed technical problem: increase of reliability and operation characteristics, and it will be widely spread in new models of „Kalashnikov Assault Rifle" design manufactured at present (AK 1 01 , AK 102, AK 1 03, AK 104, AK 1 05 etc.).

Sours: https://www.google.com/patents/WO1999005467A1

Kalashnikov Rifles

'Kalashnikov Rifles' - 38 News Result(s)

  • As Taliban Takes Over, Some Swap Iconic AK-47s For Made-In-America Rifles
  • Kalashnikov Woos Gadget Lovers With Ultima Shotgun That Syncs With Smartphones, Eyes Production in India
  • Russia Marks Kalashnikov's 100th Birthday With Exhibit And Selfies

    Russia Marks Kalashnikov's 100th Birthday With Exhibit And Selfies

    World News | Agence France-Presse | Saturday November 9, 2019

    Dozens of cadets and youngsters from Russia's Youth Army have been getting up close and personal with perhaps the world's most iconic firearm as their country marks the centenary of the birth of Mikhail Kalashnikov, inventor of the legendary AK-47 rifle.

  • Made In India AK-203 Guns May Be Used By Army In Jammu And Kashmir
  • Hope AK-203 Rifles Will Help Indian Security Forces, Says Vladimir Putin
  • AK-203 Rifles, "Made-In-Amethi", Because Of Us, Says PM Modi

    AK-203 Rifles, "Made-In-Amethi", Because Of Us, Says PM Modi

    India News | Edited by Anindita Sanyal | Monday March 4, 2019

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi today took the battle against Congress to party chief Rahul Gandhi's backyard, Amethi, where he accused the sitting parliamentarian of lies and failing to deliver on his promise of generating jobs for 1,500 people.

  • At UP Factory, Kalashnikov To Make Successor To The Iconic AK-47
  • Kalashnikov Gave The World AK-47. Now It's Making 'Suicide Drones'
  • May Sign More Defence Deals With India, US Sanctions No Bar: Russia
  • Arms Racket: 12 AK-47s Fished Out Of Well In Bihar, Police Say More To Come
  • Vladimir Putin Shows Off Sniper Skills, Fires New Kalashnikov Rifle
  • Russia's Proposal For Joint Venture For Production Of AK Rifles Rejected
  • Kalashnikov SM-1 Off-Road Electric Motorcycle Unveiled

    Kalashnikov SM-1 Off-Road Electric Motorcycle Unveiled

    Written by CarAndBike Team | Tuesday August 28, 2018

    Best known for the AK-47 assault rifle, Russian arms manufacturer Kalashnikov has unveiled an off-road electric motorcycle at a Russian army show. The Kalashnikov SM-1, as it's called, has a top speed of 90 kmph with a range of 150 km on a single charge on its lithium-ion battery.

  • Makers Of AK-47 Showcases New Electric Car 'CV-1', Plans To Take On Tesla

    Makers Of AK-47 Showcases New Electric Car 'CV-1', Plans To Take On Tesla

    Reported by Cyrus Dhabhar, Written by Cyrus Dhabhar | Friday August 24, 2018

    Kalashnikov, the makers of the famous (or infamous) AK-47 Assault Rifle has just showcased a new electric car. Yes, you read that right. Called the CV-1, the 'supercar' as claimed by the machine gun maker was unveiled in Moscow yesterday. Based on the body of the IZh 21252 Kombi, a Soviet era station wagon from the 1970s, the new CV-1 plans to take...

  • AK-47 Manufacturer To Make Electric Motorcycles

    AK-47 Manufacturer To Make Electric Motorcycles

    Reported by Preetam Bora, Written by CarAndBike Team | Friday October 20, 2017

    Kalashnikov, the Russian firm best known for the AK-47 assault rifle, is getting ready to introduce electric motorcycles. Kalashnikov is one of the largest arms manufacturer in Russia.

More News »

'Kalashnikov Rifles' - 1 Video Result(s)

'Kalashnikov Rifles' - 38 News Result(s)

  • As Taliban Takes Over, Some Swap Iconic AK-47s For Made-In-America Rifles
  • Kalashnikov Woos Gadget Lovers With Ultima Shotgun That Syncs With Smartphones, Eyes Production in India
  • Russia Marks Kalashnikov's 100th Birthday With Exhibit And Selfies

    Russia Marks Kalashnikov's 100th Birthday With Exhibit And Selfies

    World News | Agence France-Presse | Saturday November 9, 2019

    Dozens of cadets and youngsters from Russia's Youth Army have been getting up close and personal with perhaps the world's most iconic firearm as their country marks the centenary of the birth of Mikhail Kalashnikov, inventor of the legendary AK-47 rifle.

  • Made In India AK-203 Guns May Be Used By Army In Jammu And Kashmir
  • Hope AK-203 Rifles Will Help Indian Security Forces, Says Vladimir Putin
  • AK-203 Rifles, "Made-In-Amethi", Because Of Us, Says PM Modi

    AK-203 Rifles, "Made-In-Amethi", Because Of Us, Says PM Modi

    India News | Edited by Anindita Sanyal | Monday March 4, 2019

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi today took the battle against Congress to party chief Rahul Gandhi's backyard, Amethi, where he accused the sitting parliamentarian of lies and failing to deliver on his promise of generating jobs for 1,500 people.

  • At UP Factory, Kalashnikov To Make Successor To The Iconic AK-47
  • Kalashnikov Gave The World AK-47. Now It's Making 'Suicide Drones'
  • May Sign More Defence Deals With India, US Sanctions No Bar: Russia
  • Arms Racket: 12 AK-47s Fished Out Of Well In Bihar, Police Say More To Come
  • Vladimir Putin Shows Off Sniper Skills, Fires New Kalashnikov Rifle
  • Russia's Proposal For Joint Venture For Production Of AK Rifles Rejected
  • Kalashnikov SM-1 Off-Road Electric Motorcycle Unveiled

    Kalashnikov SM-1 Off-Road Electric Motorcycle Unveiled

    Written by CarAndBike Team | Tuesday August 28, 2018

    Best known for the AK-47 assault rifle, Russian arms manufacturer Kalashnikov has unveiled an off-road electric motorcycle at a Russian army show. The Kalashnikov SM-1, as it's called, has a top speed of 90 kmph with a range of 150 km on a single charge on its lithium-ion battery.

  • Makers Of AK-47 Showcases New Electric Car 'CV-1', Plans To Take On Tesla

    Makers Of AK-47 Showcases New Electric Car 'CV-1', Plans To Take On Tesla

    Reported by Cyrus Dhabhar, Written by Cyrus Dhabhar | Friday August 24, 2018

    Kalashnikov, the makers of the famous (or infamous) AK-47 Assault Rifle has just showcased a new electric car. Yes, you read that right. Called the CV-1, the 'supercar' as claimed by the machine gun maker was unveiled in Moscow yesterday. Based on the body of the IZh 21252 Kombi, a Soviet era station wagon from the 1970s, the new CV-1 plans to take...

  • AK-47 Manufacturer To Make Electric Motorcycles

    AK-47 Manufacturer To Make Electric Motorcycles

    Reported by Preetam Bora, Written by CarAndBike Team | Friday October 20, 2017

    Kalashnikov, the Russian firm best known for the AK-47 assault rifle, is getting ready to introduce electric motorcycles. Kalashnikov is one of the largest arms manufacturer in Russia.

More News »

'Kalashnikov Rifles' - 1 Video Result(s)

Your search did not match any documents

A few suggestions

  • Make sure all words are spelled correctly
  • Try different keywords
  • Try more general keywords

Check the NDTV Archives:https://archives.ndtv.com

Sours: https://www.ndtv.com/topic/kalashnikov-rifles
  1. Ryuzaki anime
  2. Hatch utah weather averages
  3. Lackland exchange hours
  4. Ford escape keychain

The AK-47: 'The Gun' That Changed The Battlefield

Author Interviews

Heard on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

The flag of Hezbollah features a fist holding an AK-47. The gun has become a symbol worldwide, says author C.J. Chivers. Stringer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stringer/Getty Images

The flag of Hezbollah features a fist holding an AK-47. The gun has become a symbol worldwide, says author C.J. Chivers.

Stringer/Getty Images

The AK-47 was designed after World War II by the Soviets, who issued the guns to the communist army's conscripted forces. In the past few decades, the AK-47 has become one of the weapons of choice for many groups -- and one of the most commonly smuggled weapons in the world.

One of the first true assault rifles, the AK-47, or Kalashnikov, was designed for soldiers who have to endure terrible conditions on the battlefield: It's light, it can carry a lot of ammunition, and it can withstand harsh weather and poor handling. The gun's design and ubiquity also have made it popular among small-arms dealers -- as well as insurgents, terrorists and child soldiers.

C.J. Chivers, a Pulitzer Prize-winning war correspondent for The New York Times, has encountered the Kalashnikov while reporting from Afghanistan and Iraq. His new book, The Gun, traces the migration of the AK-47 across the world, detailing the consequences of its spread.

The Gun
By C.J. Chivers
Hardcover, 496 pages
Simon & Schuster
List Price: $28

Read An Excerpt

"It's pretty hard in many parts of the world, particularly in Afghanistan, to go [into] territory under insurgent control, and not be ambushed by Kalashnikovs," says Chivers. "Their numbers are so outsized that this is quite a common experience."

One estimate by the World Bank suggests that 100 million of the 500 million total firearms available worldwide are variations of the Kalashnikov.

"There's a lot of measures of a weapon, and one of them is how they work against a conventional foe, like the United States military," he says. "That's not the best measure. The best measure is how they work against a larger set of victims: how they work against civilians, how they work at checkpoints [and] how they work in the commission of crimes for all of these things. It's a [terribly effective] weapon."

Chivers has covered wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Chechnya and served as the Times' Moscow correspondent from June 2004 through mid-2008. He also served as an infantry officer in the United States Marine Corps from 1988 to 1994. He received the Livingston Award for International Journalism for his coverage of the collapse of commercial fishing in the North Atlantic and shared a Pulitzer Prize in 2009 for his dispatches from Afghanistan and Pakistan.

C.J. Chivers is a war correspondent for The New York Times. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 2009 as part of a team of reporters and photographers reporting from Pakistan and Afghanistan. Tyler Hicks hide caption

toggle caption
Tyler Hicks

C.J. Chivers is a war correspondent for The New York Times. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 2009 as part of a team of reporters and photographers reporting from Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Tyler Hicks

Interview Highlights

On why child soldiers favor them

"It's out there. And the weapon that's out there is the weapon that tends to get used. But the other reason is the design. It's very, very simple. It's almost intuitive. You can take it apart very quickly and put it back together just as quickly. It's simple to clean. It's simple to maintain. Most of the Kalashnikovs out there are very well made for the actual conditions of war. It has an excellent protective finish. It's chromed on the inside of its barrel and its chamber. All of these things mean that if you're not particularly attentive in caring for it, it's still going to last and it's still going to work."

On the invention of the AK-47

"It was a weapon that was designed to be issued to the communist conscripted forces. It was going to be the standard shoulder firearm. And the Soviet Union was really quite brilliant at copying its enemies' patterns. ... The AK-47 was basically a conceptual knockoff -- a copy of a German idea, which was to take a cartridge midway in size between those used by pistols and those used by the traditional rifles of the time and to take this medium-powered intermediate cartridge and build a weapon around it. And this brought several technical advantages. With a lighter-weight cartridge, you could carry more ammunition, which meant each solider could be more effective and could last longer in a fight because he would have more ammunition in his pack or kit."

On the AK-47's range

"The other thing it tells you ... is that, in some ways, it's a mediocre weapon. It's not especially accurate and it's used often by people who are often not especially skilled. I'm one of them, but there's many, many more [people] who have been ambushed by Kalashnikovs and not been shot. Because they miss you. And there's reasons they miss you that are rooted in the weapon's own design and also in the training of the people that carry them."

"The weapon is designed with a relatively short barrel and it's designed with a relatively loose fit of its parts and it's got a heavy operating system and it shoots a medium-powered ammunition. At longer ranges, it's actually not incredibly effective. At shorter ranges, it's a terrible weapon. But at longer ranges -- which is pretty common in the arid regions such as Afghanistan and Iraq where there's not a lot of vegetation -- they often miss."

Excerpt: 'The Gun'

The Gun
By C.J. Chivers
Hardcover, 496 pages
Simon & Schuster
List Price: $28

The Birth of Machine Guns

Richard J. Gatling was seeking business. In the meticulous penmanship of a man born to a land-owning Southern family, he began a letter to President Abraham Lincoln.

It was February 18, 1864, late in the American Civil War and an extraordinary period in the evolution of firearms: dawn in the age of the machine gun and yet a time when officers still roamed battlefields with swords. At forty-five, Gatling was a medical-school graduate who had never practiced medicine, opting instead to turn his stern father's sideline as an inventor into a career. For twenty years he had mainly designed agricultural devices. Dr. Gatling, as he liked to be called, came from a North Carolina family that owned as many as twenty slaves. But he had moved north to Indiana for business and marriage, and when the war began in 1861 he did not align himself with the secessionists who formed the Confederacy. He knew men on both sides. Far from his place of birth and away from the battlefields, he had taken to viewing the contents of the caskets returning to the railroad depot in Indianapolis. Inside were the remains of Union soldiers, many felled by trauma but most by infection or disease. Seeing these gruesome sights, Gatling shifted attention from farm devices to firearms, and to the ambition of designing a rapid-fire weapon, a pursuit that since the fourteenth century had attracted and eluded gunsmiths around the world. "I witnessed almost daily the departure of troops to the front and the return of the wounded, sick and dead," he wrote. "It occurred to me that if I could invent a machine -- a gun -- that would by its rapidity of fire enable one man to do as much battle duty as a hundred, that it would to a great extent, supersede the necessity of large armies, and consequently exposure to battle and disease would be greatly diminished."

Gatling did not fit any caricature of an arms profiteer. By the available accounts, he carried himself as a neat and finely dressed gentleman. He was kindhearted to his family and associates, soft-spoken at home, and self-conscious enough that he wore a beard to hide the smallpox scars that peppered his face. He made for a curious figure: an earnest and competitive showboat when promoting his weapon, but restrained and modest on the subject of himself. He was, his son-in-law said, "an exception to the rule that no man is great to his valet." One interviewer noted that he professed to feel "that if he could invent a gun which would do the work of 100 men, the other ninety and nine could remain at home and be saved to the country." He repeated this point throughout his life, explaining a sentiment that he insisted rose from seeing firsthand the ruined remains of young men lost in a fratricidal war. His records make clear that he was driven by profits. He never ceased claiming that compassion urged him on at the start.

Gatling was neither a military nor a social visionary. But he was a gifted tinkerer and an unrelenting salesman, and he found good help. His plans proceeded swiftly. Though there is no record of his having prior experience with weapon design, by late 1862, after viewing rival guns, drawing on his knowledge of agricultural machinery, and enlisting the mechanical assistance of Otis Frink, a local machinist, he had received a patent for a prototype he called the "battery gun." "The object of this invention," he told the U.S. Patent Office, "is to obtain a simple, compact, durable, and efficient firearm for war purposes, to be used either in attack or defence, one that is light when compared with ordinary field artillery, that is easily transported, that may be rapidly fired, and that can be operated by few men."

Gatling's battery gun, while imperfect in its early forms, was a breakthrough in a field that had frustrated everyone who had tried before. Since medieval times, the pursuit of a single weapon that could mass musket fire had confounded generations of military-minded gunsmiths and engineers. Gunsmiths had long ago learned to place barrels side by side on frames to create firearms capable of discharging projectiles in rapid succession. These unwieldy devices, known as volley guns, were capable in theory of blasting a hole in a line of advancing soldiers. They had limitations in practice, among them slow reload times and difficulties in adjusting fire toward moving targets and their flanks. Ammunition was a problem, too, as was the poor state of metallurgy, although this did not discourage everyone, and the lethal possibilities of a machine that could concentrate gunfire attracted would-be inventors of many stripes. One of the few highly detailed accounts of the early models suggests an inauspicious start. In 1835, Giuseppe Fieschi, a Corsican, rented an apartment on Boulevard du Temple in Paris. In a room overlooking the street he secretly constructed a frame of thick oak posts and attached twenty-five rifle barrels, all in a space of roughly a meter square. Each barrel was packed with multiple musket balls and a heavy charge of powder, then aligned to aim together at a point on the street below. Fieschi waited. On July 28, his intended victim appeared: King Louis-Philippe. Fieschi fired his makeshift device, and a volley flew from the apartment window and slammed into the king's entourage. In the technical sense, the "infernal machine," as his device came to be known in Europe, was both a success and a failure. It had a terrible effect. A piece of lead grazed Louis-Philippe's skull, just above his face, and others cut down his company, killing eighteen people. But an examination of the gun later suggested that while it worked well enough as a tool for assassination or terror, it was hardly ready for the battlefield. Four barrels had failed to fire. Four others had ruptured. Two of these had exploded, scattering lead inside the assassin's rented room and gravely injuring Fieschi, who was captured and saved from his injuries by the French authorities, to be executed later by guillotine.

Excerpt from The Gun by C.J. Chivers. Copyright 2010 by CJ Chivers. Printed with permission of Simon & Schuster.

The Gun

by C. J. Chivers

Sours: https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=130493013
New Guns from Kalashnikov USA

Why would Russia’s Kalashnikov make a NATO-friendly assault rifle?

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — Firearms manufacturer Kalashnikov is exhibiting its new AK-19 rifle for the first time outside of Russia during an arms trade show in the United Arab Emirates.

The assault rifle meets NATO’s caliber standards: It is chambered for 5.56 x 45mm rounds, and it has a Picatinny rail, a new collapsible folding stock to adjust length, improved aperture sight and a quick-detachable suppressor.

The gun is based on the AK-12, which was accepted into service by the Russian military in 2018. The AK-19 is compact and suitable for concealed carry.

Defense News asked the Russian company’s CEO, Dmitry Tarasov, why it would design a NATO-friendly rifle when there are measures in place that prevent NATO members from buying it.

“The 5.56 × 45mm round has been traditionally used by many countries of the [Middle East], Southeast Asia and Latin America. It is a huge market, and many countries in those regions view the weapons originating from Russia with much respect. AK-19 is aimed to woo these markets,” Tarasov replied. “The [Middle East] region is, indeed, in our focus as a fast-growing market for defense products. Our legendary brand is well-established in the region, and we are planning to build upon that.”

At IDEX, Kalashnikov is also showcasing a number of military and commercial firearms, speedboats, and fire-and-forget missiles, commercial UAVs, and bulletproof gear and equipment for special forces. “We have brought such a variety of products because we feel the ME is the right market for them and we are seeing a lot of interest from delegations at IDEX,” Tarasov told Defense News.

So which of Kalashnikov’s products are getting the most attention from potential Mideast customers?

“I would prioritize assault rifles, along with the 100s and 200s series [of] AKs. We have unveiled our new AK-19 chambered for NATO rounds. Our new PLK compact pistol that has just completed trials in Russia is a great product. We promote it as a compact pistol that has excellent ergonomics and will cater for the needs of police, paramilitary and security forces,” Tarasov said.

When asked what the next Kalashnikov will look like, Tarasov said: “I will not disclose that, but I’ll give you a hint: We like modern and even futuristic design, we opt for ergonomic solutions.”

About Agnes Helou

Agnes Helou is a Middle East correspondent for Defense News. Her interests include missile defense, cybersecurity, the interoperability of weapons systems and strategic issues in the Middle East and Gulf region.

Share:

More In IDEX
Sours: https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/idex/2021/02/23/why-would-russias-kalashnikov-make-a-nato-friendly-assault-rifle/

Firearms kalashnikov

Russia's Kalashnikov gun-maker struggles with Western ban

By Sarah Rainsford
BBC News, Izhevsk, Central Russia

It is probably the best-known weapon in the world, brandished by everyone from Che Guevara to Osama bin Laden. But the Kalashnikov assault rifle has failed to produce a profit for its makers for years.

Things were just starting to improve when the firm was hit by Western sanctions.

With Russian military stores full of the famously durable Kalashnikovs, and dwindling orders from abroad, the company had turned its attention to civilian firearms markets.

In January it finally secured a foothold in the biggest of them, sealing a lucrative deal to supply up to 200,000 rifles a year in the US.

But in July, Kalashnikov was placed on a US list of eight arms manufacturers sanctioned for Russia's role in fomenting the crisis in Ukraine. The deal was halted with under half the initial order delivered. It was added to an EU list in September.

"Of course I was upset, because I didn't understand why we'd been sanctioned," Kalashnikov director Alexei Krivoruchko told the BBC, arguing that the firm was no longer wholly state-owned since he and another Russian businessman had invested in a 49% stake.

Also, he points out, it primarily produces firearms for the civilian market.

"The US was a key market for us, one that we planned to develop," Mr Krivoruchko says. "It's a big loss, there's no point saying otherwise."

There are now some 200 models of Kalashnikov, still produced at the original factory in Izhevsk, two hours' flight east of Moscow.

In Soviet times, the sprawling plant manufactured around 600,000 rifles a year for the military. Last year it turned out one tenth of that number and 80% were civilian firearms.

With a new crisis management team on board, the firm is now on a major efficiency drive. Production has already been streamlined, putting the plant on course to double its output this year.

The next goal is to upgrade the ancient, chunky equipment that fills the shop floor: one machine was discovered from the 19th Century.

But sanctions are complicating life there, too, as Kalashnikov now has to seek suppliers in Asia, instead of Europe.

"I remember all sorts of times here, including the 1990s, when wages weren't paid, or only in part. And when the firm declared bankruptcy," Nikolai Svintsov reminisces as he assembles a hunting rifle on an old, rutted wooden worktop.

As part of its comeback effort, the weapons firm was recently re-launched as the oddly-named Kalashnikov Concern, with a red-carpet event in Moscow complete with high-heeled hostesses handing out replicas of the rifle's distinctive, banana-shaped magazine.

A glitzy video promoted the AK as a "weapon of peace", wielded historically by liberation movements in their "search for justice" and, more recently, by Russia's own anti-terrorist Special Forces.

The fact that the Kalashnikov is currently used by both sides fighting in eastern Ukraine - the conflict that led to sanctions - was glossed over.

"We're trying to hear customers' needs," explains another of the young team of managers, Dmitry Tarasov, of his firm's attempts to win a share of the civilian firearms market.

"Of course we can compete," he insists. "The Kalashnikov is the most famous assault gun."

But first the weapon has to compete against itself.

In Cold War times, Moscow allowed its allies to produce Kalashnikovs locally and some continued to do that long after the Iron Curtain fell. Those copies ate deeply into post-Soviet profits in Izhevsk.

As the right to any legal challenge has long since passed, the firm is preparing to launch a fully updated rifle in the hope that Kalashnikov users will upgrade too. A civilian version will follow.

The AK-12, as it is known, is one of two assault rifles currently being tested by the Russian military as part of President Vladimir Putin's military modernisation programme.

Final word on which firm gets the big state order is due early next year - a decision the Kalashnikov boss calls "extremely important".

But he also insists his firm is coping under sanctions.

Senior managers say they have found new buyers for the extra rifles originally intended for the US. Mr Krivoruchko admits it was not easy but will not be drawn on details.

While US weapons enthusiasts will probably manage without a Kalashnikov, for the company itself, hitting the lucrative American market was a clear route to recovery.

If the bosses are lobbying Mr Putin to push for an end to sanctions, Alexei Krivoruchko is not admitting it.

"There's nothing we can do," he says. "But we hope the sanctions will be lifted soon."

He has a multi-million dollar investment riding on that.

More on this story

Sours: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-30404648
Military rifles and machine guns of Kalashnikov Group

What is the deadliest weapon of the 20th century?

Perhaps you think first of the atomic bomb, estimated to have killed as many as 200,000 people when the United States dropped two on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

But another weapon is responsible for far more deaths – numbering up into the millions. It’s the Kalashnikov assault rifle, commonly known as the AK-47.

Originally developed in secrecy for the Soviet military, an estimated 100 million AK-47s and its variants have been produced to date. This gun is now found throughout the world, including in the hands of many American civilians, who in 2012 bought as many AK-47s as the Russian police and military. As a physician, I have witnessed the destruction this weapon can wreak on human flesh.

Kalashnikov’s invention

Russian Mikhail Kalashnikov invented the weapon that bears his name in the middle of the 20th century. Born on Nov. 10, 1919, Kalashnikov was a tank mechanic in the Soviet military during the Second World War. He was wounded during the German invasion of the USSR in 1941.

Having seen firsthand the combat advantage conferred by Germany’s superior firearms, Kalashnikov resolved to develop a better weapon. While still in the military, he produced several designs that lost out to competitors before eventually producing the first AK-47.

The name of Kalashnikov’s greatest invention stands for Automat Kalashnikova 1947, the year it was first produced.

In 1949, the AK-47 became the assault rifle of the Soviet Army. Later adopted by other nations in the Warsaw Pact, the weapon quickly spread around the world, becoming a symbol of revolution in such far-flung lands as Vietnam, Afghanistan, Colombia and Mozambique, on whose flag it figures prominently.

Over the course of his long life, Kalashnikov continued to tweak his classic design. In 1959, production began on his AKM, which replaced the AK-47’s milled receiver with one made of stamped metal, making it both lighter and less expensive to produce. He also developed the cartridge-fed PK machine gun. Modified AK-47s are still in production in countries around the world.

The AK-47’s advantages and abundance

Why was the AK-47 such a revolutionary rifle?

It is relatively inexpensive to produce, short and light to carry, and easy to use, with little recoil. It also boasts legendary reliability under harsh conditions ranging from waterlogged jungles to Middle Eastern sandstorms, in both extreme cold and heat.

It also requires relatively little maintenance. This stems from its large gas piston and wide clearances between moving parts, which help to prevent it from jamming.

Kalashnikov liked to boast about the rifle’s superiority to the American military’s M-16 rifle. “During the Vietnam War,” he said in a 2007 interview, “American soldiers would throw away their M-16s to grab AK-47s and bullets for it from dead Vietnamese soldiers. And I hear American soldiers in Iraq use it quite often.”

The world’s most abundant firearm is also well suited to crime and terrorism. The hostage-takers who stormed the Olympic Village in Munich in 1972 were armed with Kalashnikovs, and mass shooters in the U.S. have used semi-automatic versions of the weapon in killings in Stockton, California, and Dallas.

The U.S. military has acted as a distributor of the weapon in conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. With a service life of 20 to 40 years, AKs are easily relocated and repurposed.

Today, global prices often run in the hundreds of dollars, but some AK-47s can be had for as little as US$50. The huge worldwide production of the weapon, particularly in countries with low labor costs, has driven prices downward.

Kalashnikov’s legacy

For his labors, the Soviet Union awarded Kalashnikov the Stalin Prize, the Red Star and the Order of Lenin. In 2007, President Vladimir Putin singled out the Kalashnikov rifle as “a symbol of the creative genius of our people.”

Kalashnikov died a national hero in 2013 at the age of 94.

Throughout most of his life, Kalashnikov rebuffed attempts to saddle him with guilt over the vast number of killings and injuries inflicted with his invention. He insisted that he had developed it for defense, not offense.

When a reporter asked in 2007 how he could sleep at night, he replied, “I sleep well. It is the politicians who are to blame for failing to come to an agreement and resorting to violence.”

Yet in the final year of his life, Kalashnikov may have experienced a change of heart. He wrote a letter to the head of the Russian Orthdox Church, saying, “The pain in my soul is unbearable. I keep asking myself the same unsolvable question: If my assault rifle took people’s lives, that means that I am responsible for their deaths.”

It’s a perennial debate: What kills? Guns, or those who carry them? At the bottom of the letter, he signed it, “a slave of God, the designer Mikhail Kalashnikov.”

[ You’re smart and curious about the world. So are The Conversation’s authors and editors.You can get our highlights each weekend.. ]

Sours: https://theconversation.com/worlds-deadliest-inventor-mikhail-kalashnikov-and-his-ak-47-126253

Now discussing:

Kalashnikov rifle

CountryVariant(s) Albania Automatiku Shqiptar 1978 model 56 (ASH-78 Tip-1) copy of Type 56 based on AKM rifle; Tipi 1982 model (ASH-82) copy of AKMS; model 56 Tip-2, copy of RPK; and model 56 Tip-3. Several other versions of the AKMS have been produced mainly with short barrels similar to Soviet AKS-74U for special forces, tank & armored crew and for helicopter pilots and police. There have also been modified ASh-82 (AKMS) with SOPMOD accessories, mainly for Albania's special forces RENEA & exports.[11]Armenia K-3 (bullpup, 5.45×39mm) Azerbaijan Khazri (AK-74M)[12]Bangladesh Chinese Type 56Bulgaria AKK/AKKS (Type 3 AK-47/w. side-folding buttstock); AKKMS (AKMS), AKKN-47 (fittings for NPSU night sights); AK-47M1 (Type 3 with black polymer furniture); AK-47MA1/AR-M1 (same as -M1, but in 5.56mm NATO); AKS-47M1 (AKMS in 5.56×45mm NATO); AKS-47S (AK-47M1, short version, with East German folding stock, laser aiming device); AKS-47UF (short version of -M1, Russian folding stock), AR-SF (same as −47UF, but 5.56mm NATO); AKS-93SM6 (similar to −47M1, cannot use grenade launcher); RKKS (RPK), AKT-47 (.22 rimfire training rifle) Cambodia Chinese Type 56, Soviet AK, and AKMChina Type 56Croatia APS-95Cuba AKM[13]East Germany[14]MPi-K/MPi-KS (AK/AKS); MPi-KM (AKM, wooden and plastic stock); MPi-KMS-72 (side-folding stock); MPi-KMS-K (carbine); MPi-AK-74N (AK-74); MPi-AKS-74N (side-folding stock); MPi-AKS-74NK (carbine); KK-MPi Mod.69 (.22 LR select-fire trainer) Egypt AK, Misr assault rifle (AKM), Maadi Ethiopia AK, AK-103 (manufactured locally at the State-run Gafat Armament Engineering Complex as the Et-97/1)[15]Finland RK 62, (7.62×39mm)

RK 95 TP, (7.62×39mm) improvements including a fire control selector and a muzzle device that enabled the firing of rifle grenades, the attachment of a silencer, or bayonet

Hungary[16]AK-55 (domestic manufacture of the 2nd Model AK); AKM-63 (also known as AMD-63 in the US; modernized AK-55), AMD-65M (modernized AKM-63, shorter barrel and side-folding stock), AMP-69 (rifle grenade launcher); AK-63F/D (other name AMM/AMMSz), AK-63MF (modernized); NGM-81 (5.56×45mm NATO; fixed and under-folding stock) India Trichy Assault Rifle, AK-7[17][18]Indo-Russia Rifles, AK-203[19]Iran KLS/KLF (AK-47/AKS), KLT (AKMS) Iraq Tabuk Sniper Rifle, Tabuk Assault Rifle (with fixed or underfolding stock, outright clones of Yugoslavian M70 rifles series), Tabuk Short Assault Rifle Nigeria Produced by the Defence Industries Corporation of Nigeria as OBJ-006[20][21]North Korea Type 58A/B (Type 3 AK/w. stamped steel folding stock), Type 68A/B (AKM/AKMS), Type 88 (AKS-74)[22][23]Pakistan Reverse engineered by hand and machine in Pakistan's highland areas (see Khyber Pass Copy) near the border of Afghanistan; more recently the Pakistan Ordnance Factories started the manufacture of an AK/AKM clone called PK-10. Pakistanis had also made a new caliber just by a little changing in original (7.62×39mm) ammo, that is known as 44 bore.[24] Pakistani 5.45mm AKs are sometimes called "Kalakovs".[25]Poland[26]pmK (kbk AK) / pmKS (kbk AKS) (name has changed from pmK – "pistolet maszynowy Kałasznikowa", Kalashnikov SMG to the kbk AK – "karabinek AK", Kalashnikov Carbine in mid-1960s) (AK/AKS); kbkg wz. 1960 (rifle grenade launcher), kbkg wz. 1960/72 (modernized); kbk AKM / kbk AKMS (AKM/AKMS); kbk wz. 1988 Tantal (5.45×39mm), skbk wz. 1989 Onyks (compact carbine); kbs wz. 1996 Beryl (5.56×45mm), kbk wz. 1996 Mini-Beryl (compact carbine) Romania PM md. 63/65 (AKM/AKMS), PM md. 80, PM md. 90, collectively exported under the umbrella name AIM or AIMS; PA md. 86 (AK-74), exported as the AIMS-74; PM md. 90 short barrel, PA md. 86 short barrel, exported as the AIMR; PSL (designated marksman rifle; other names PSL-54C, Romak III, FPK and SSG-97) Sudan MAZ[27] (based on the Type 56) Ukraine Vepr (bullpup, 5.45×39mm), Malyuk (bullpup)[28]United States US132 rifle (7.62×39mm), US132Z assault rifle (7.62×39mm), US109L shotgun (12 Gauge) & US109T shotgun (12 Gauge). Produced by Kalashnikov USA.[29][30][31]Vietnam AKM-1, AKM-VN (AKM) assault rifle, TUL-1 (RPK) light machine gun, Galil ACE 31/32 assault rifle Venezuela AK-103 [32] / License granted to Venezuela[33]Yugoslavia/SerbiaM64, M70, M72, M76, M77, M80, M82, M85, M90, M91, M92, M99, M21
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalashnikov_rifle


783 784 785 786 787