Colt 1911 m1a1

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Colt 1909 U.S. Army Marked...

Colt 1909 U.S. Army Marked .45 Colt (C17578)

Price$1,995.00

WWI U.S. Army issue revolver with 5.5" barrel. The revolver is marked U.S. on the underside of the grip and barrel. The revolver has approximately 65% of its original blue that is beginning to patina. The bore is excellent, bright with strong rifling. The grips are very good with minimal handling wear. Overall a very good plus condition.

Colt U.S. 1903 General...

Colt U.S. 1903 General Officers .32 Auto (C15984)

Price$6,500.00

Colt 1903 .32 Auto caliber pistol. General Officers pistol issued to Brigadier General Richard Holmes Harrison in 1955. Bore is excellent. Pistol has some holster wear. A hard to find General Officers pistol! This pistol is listed in John Brunners book The Colt Pocket Hammerless Automatic Pistols.

Colt 1902 Military Model...

Colt 1902 Military Model .38 Auto (C17473)

Price$2,250.00

Military model in .38 auto with 4.75" barrel. Manufactured in 1910. Has about 40% original blue mixed with brown patina. Colt address and roll marks are still sharp and visible. Action works perfectly. Bore is very good with light etching and good rifling. Grips are excellent. Overall condition is very good.

Colt 1909 .45 LC (C17479)

Colt 1909 .45 LC (C17479)

Price$1,595.00

U.S. Army issue revolver in .45 Colt caliber. The barrel is marked "United States Property" on the underside. Has about 90% blue with most of the wear on the grip frame, and has a small area of pitting on the cylinder. Bore is bright and rifling is excellent. The grips show light handling marks and are marked "R.A.C", as is the gun. The grips are numbered to the gun and are marked on the...

Colt Commando .38 Special...

Colt Commando .38 Special (C17433)

Price$1,650.00

US WWII military inspected revolver. Many of these were issued to plant guards. This example is excellent. Left side of frame has a flaming bomb proof mark. Very fine example.

Colt 1917 .45 ACP (C17419)

Colt 1917 .45 ACP (C17419)

Price$1,250.00

US WWI military issued revolver. Grips are a later WWII era replacement. Lanyard ring has been filled. Metal has a mostly gray patina. Bore has strong rifling with some light frosting. Action works perfectly and locks up tight. Good overall condition.

Colt 1917 .45 ACP (C17405)

Colt 1917 .45 ACP (C17405)

Price$1,250.00

US WWI military revolver. Revolver has been arsenal refurbished post war. Frame is marked "AA". Bore is excellent. Action works properly. Grips have been checkered. Lanyard ring has been filled. Markings on butt and bottom of barrel are easily visible. Good overall condition.

Colt WWI Black Army 1911...

Colt WWI Black Army 1911 45ACP (C17392)

Price$8,500.00

Very fine WWI US military pistol. Metal has approximately 98% original finish with some very minor etching on right side of slide. Bore is excellent. Grips are very good plus with sharp checkering. Correct two-tone magazine with lanyard loop. A very desirable Black Army model. Hard to find in this condition!

Colt 1911 Black Army .45...

Colt 1911 Black Army .45 ACP (C17399)

Price$8,995.00

Very fine US WWI issued military pistol. Manufactured in 1918. Bore is mint. Grips are excellent with sharp checkering. Correct two-tone magazine. Excellent overall condition.

Colt 1911 Marine Corp...

Colt 1911 Marine Corp Issued (C16962)

Price$12,950.00

Made in 1917. 45 ACP with a 5” barrel. This gun is in very fine condition with most of the original finish. Grips are excellent. This is part of a contract shipped to the US Marines in Philadelphia, Pa. This gun comes with a Colt factory letter. Very fine example of a WWI Marine Corp...

Identified Colt 1911 to...

Identified Colt 1911 to U.S. Army Air...

Price$7,500.00

Identified Colt 1911 to U.S. Army Air Serviceman Clifford Dounce. Made in 1914. Very interesting gun identified to U.S. Army air servicemen Clifford Dounce. The set includes, a WWI summer tunic, a web belt with holster and a Manual of Military Aviation. The holster is inscribed “Wilbur Wright Field, Dayton”, “Dallas, Texas December 26 1917” and “Lieutenant C.B. Dounce, December 31, 1918”....

Colt 1902 45 LC (C16651)

Colt 1902 45 LC (C16651)

Price$1,450.00

US military revolver. Frame and trigger guard have inspectors markings "RAC". Grips are a latter replacement. Metal has a brown patina. Bore has strong rifling with pitting. Action works, but is gritty. "Fair" overall condition.

Colt U.S. 1902 "Alaskan"...

Colt U.S. 1902 "Alaskan" .45 LC (C16634)

Price$2,375.00

U.S. military revolver known as the "Alaskan" or sometimes as the "Philippine" model. Used primarily in the Philippines. The large trigger guard and long trigger provide better leverage to overcome the heavier hammer spring during double action firing. This feature was requested by the Army. The 6" barrel has an excellent bore. All the metal is a smooth blue/brown with areas of mottling....

Colt 1903 .38 Colt  (C16571)

Colt 1903 .38 Colt (C16571)

Price$1,950.00

Colt 1903 .38 Colt caliber revolver. RAC Inspected (Rinaldo A Carr) marked 1903 on left side of frame. Bore is very good with strong rifling action works perfectly. Grips are excellent, no chips or cracks. This revolver comes with the correct U.S Military holster marked Rock Island Arsenal, dated 1908, also in very good condition. Revolver has approximately 70% bright blue. Grip straps have...

Colt 1903 General Officer...

Colt 1903 General Officer .32 (C16598)

Price$7,500.00

Colt 1903 General Officer .32 caliber pistol. Made in 1943. Has a 3¾” barrel in .32 caliber. Gun is in excellent original condition with 99% plus of the original finish. Grips are excellent. Gun is in almost new condition. This gun was issued to Brigadier General Ellis Edmund Willhoyt. General Willhoyt served in the Army Corps of Engineers during WWII through Vietnam, eventually...

Colt 1902 .45 LC (C16432)

Colt 1902 .45 LC (C16432)

Price$3,250.00

Colt 1902 .45 LC caliber revolver. Philippine Constabulary model revolver. Marked "1902” and "U.S.” on right side frame. Inspector markings "JTT” and "RAC” marked on left side of cylinder. Barrel and caliber markings are clear. Action works and locks up perfectly. Grips are perfect. No chips, no cracks and fit perfect. Bore is excellent. Note: There is a small mark "TC34” on the left side of...

Colt 1901 .38 LC (C16468)

Colt 1901 .38 LC (C16468)

Price$795.00

Colt 1901 .38 LC caliber revolver. U.S. Military revolver. Butt has had markings removed and needs a lanyard loop. Frame has inspectors’ initials J.T.T. Good overall condition. Grips are later replacements. Right side has a chip.

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COLT 1911 pistol PRICE AND HISTORICAL VALUE

What is a COLT 1911 Pistol Worth?

A COLT 1911 pistol is currently worth an average price of $1,484.89 new and $1,405.66 used . The 12 month average price is $1,385.60 new and $1,364.46 used.

The new value of a COLT 1911 pistol has risen $164.23 dollars over the past 12 months to a price of $1,484.89 . The used value of a COLT 1911 pistol has risen $238.92 dollars over the past 12 months to a price of $1,405.66 .

The demand of new COLT 1911 pistol's has risen 142 units over the past 12 months. The demand of used COLT 1911 pistol's has risen 112 units over the past 12 months.

Estimated Value

*Using 80% condition for calculating used Values.
*Caliber, Barrel Length, Generations, Sub Models may all affect item price. Make sure your search is specific enough to get the correct value.
 UsedNew
Trade In$913.68$965.18
Private Party$1,405.66$1,484.89
Sours: https://truegunvalue.com/pistol/colt/1911/price-historical-value-196
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The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACPcartridge,[1] which served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States armed forces from 1911 to 1985. It was first used in later stages of the Philippine-American War, and was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The M1911 is still carried by some U.S. forces. Its formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original Model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam era.[1] In total, the United States procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols in military contracts during its service life. The M1911 was replaced by the M9 pistol as the standard U.S. sidearm in the early 1990s, but due to its popularity among users, it has not been completely phased out. Modern M1911 variants are still in use by some units within the U.S. Army Special Forces, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps.[4]

Designed by John Browning, the M1911 is the best-known of his designs to use the short recoil principle in its basic design. The pistol was widely copied, and this operating system rose to become the preeminent type of the 20th century and of nearly all modern centerfire pistols. It is popular with civilian shooters in competitive events such as USPSA, IDPA, International Practical Shooting Confederation, and Bullseye shooting. Compact variants are popular civilian concealed carry weapons, because of the design's inherent slim width and the power of the .45 ACP cartridge.[5]

History[]

Early history and adaptations[]

The M1911 pistol originated in the late 1890s as the result of a search for a suitable self-loading (or semi-automatic) pistol to replace the variety of revolvers then in service.[6] The United States was adopting new firearms at a phenomenal rate; several new pistols and two all-new service rifles (the M1892/96/98 Krag and M1895 Navy Lee), as well as a series of revolvers by Colt and Smith & Wesson for the Army and Navy, were adopted just in that decade. The next decade would see a similar pace, including the adoption of several more revolvers and an intensive search for a self-loading pistol that would culminate in official adoption of the M1911 after the turn of the decade.

Hiram S. Maxim had designed a self-loading rifle in the 1880s, but was preoccupied with machine guns. Nevertheless, the application of his principle of using bullet energy to reload led to several self-loading pistols in 1896. The designs caught the attention of various militaries, each of which began programs to find a suitable one for their forces. In the U.S., such a program would lead to a formal test at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century.[7]

During the end of 1899 and start of 1900, a test of self-loading pistols was conducted, which included entries from Mauser (the C96 "Broomhandle"), Mannlicher (the Steyr Mannlicher M1894), and Colt (the Colt M1900).[6]

This led to a purchase of 1,000 DWMLuger pistols, chambered in 7.65 mm Luger, a bottlenecked cartridge. During field trials these ran into some problems, especially with stopping power. Other governments had made similar complaints. Consequently, DWM produced an enlarged version of the round, the 9 mm Parabellum (known in current military parlance as the 9×19 mm NATO), a necked-up version of the 7.65 mm round. Fifty of these were tested as well by the U.S. Army in 1903.[8]

American units fighting Moro guerrillas during the Philippine-American War using the then-standard Colt M1892 revolver, in .38 Long Colt, found it to be unsuitable for the rigors of jungle warfare, particularly in terms of stopping power, as the Moros had very high battle morale and frequently used drugs to inhibit the sensation of pain.[9] The U.S. Army briefly reverted to using the M1873 single-action revolver in .45 Colt caliber, which had been standard during the late 19th century; the heavier bullet was found to be more effective against charging tribesmen.[10] The problems prompted the then–Chief of Ordnance, General William Crozier, to authorize further testing for a new service pistol.[10]

Following the 1904 Thompson-LaGarde pistol round effectiveness tests, Colonel John T. Thompson stated that the new pistol "should not be of less than .45 caliber" and would preferably be semi-automatic in operation.[10] This led to the 1906 trials of pistols from six firearms manufacturing companies (namely, Colt, Bergmann, Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM), Savage Arms Company, Knoble, Webley, and White-Merril.[10]

Of the six designs submitted, three were eliminated early on, leaving only the Savage, Colt, and DWM designs chambered in the new .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) cartridge.[10] These three still had issues that needed correction, but only Colt and Savage resubmitted their designs. There is some debate over the reasons for DWM's withdrawal—some say they felt there was bias and that the DWM design was being used primarily as a "whipping boy" for the Savage and Colt pistols,[11] though this does not fit well with the earlier 1900 purchase of the DWM design over the Colt and Steyr entries. In any case, a series of field tests from 1907 to 1911 were held to decide between the Savage and Colt designs.[10] Both designs were improved between each testing over their initial entries, leading up to the final test before adoption.[10]

Among the areas of success for the Colt was a test at the end of 1910 attended by its designer, John Browning. Six thousand rounds were fired from a single pistol over the course of two days. When the gun began to grow hot, it was simply immersed in water to cool it. The Colt gun passed with no reported malfunctions, while the Savage designs had 37.[10]

Service history[]

Following its success in trials, the Colt pistol was formally adopted by the Army on March 29, 1911, thus gaining its designation, M1911 (Model 1911). It was adopted by the Navy and Marine Corps in 1913. Originally manufactured only by Colt, demand for the firearm in World War I saw the expansion of manufacture to the government-owned Springfield Armory.[12] The Director of Civilian Marksmanship began manufacture of M1911 pistols for members of the National Rifle Association in August 1912. Approximately 100 pistols stamped "N.R.A." below the serial number were manufactured at Springfield Armory and by Colt.[13]

Battlefield experience in the First World War led to some more small external changes, completed in 1924. The new version received a modified type classification, M1911A1, in 1926 with a stipulation that M1911A1s should have serial numbers higher than 700,000 with lower serial numbers designated M1911.[14] Changes to the original design were minor and consisted of a shorter trigger, cutouts in the frame behind the trigger, an arched mainspring housing, a longer grip safety spur (to prevent hammer bite), a wider front sight, a shorter spur on the hammer, and simplified grip checkering by eliminating the "Double Diamond" reliefs.[10] Those unfamiliar with the design are often unable to tell the difference between the two versions at a glance. No significant internal changes were made, and parts remained interchangeable between the two.[10]

Working for the U.S. Ordnance Office, David Marshall Williams developed a .22 training version of the M1911 using a floating chamber to give the .22 long rifle rimfire recoil similar to the .45 version.[10] As the Colt Service Ace, this was available both as a pistol and as a conversion kit for .45 M1911 pistols.[10]

World War II[]

World War II and the years leading up to it created a great demand. During the war, about 1.9 million units were procured by the U.S. Government for all forces, production being undertaken by several manufacturers, including Remington Rand (900,000 produced), Colt (400,000), Ithaca Gun Company (400,000), Union Switch & Signal (50,000), and Singer (500). So many were produced that after 1945 the government did not order any new pistols, and simply used existing parts inventories to "arsenal refinish" guns when necessary. This pistol was favored by US military personnel.[15] Singer produced pistols in particular are highly prized collectibles, commanding high prices even in poor condition.[16]

Before World War II, a small number of the original M1911 pattern pistols were produced under license at the Norwegian weapon factory Kongsberg Vaapenfabrikk, which were designated "Pistol M/1914" and unofficially known as "Kongsberg Colt". During the German occupation of Norway the production continued. Norway never updated the design to the M1911A1 standard. These pistols are highly regarded by modern collectors, with the 920 examples stamped with Nazi Waffenamt codes and the unknown number of unmarked examples assembled by the Norwegian resistance movement (the "Matpakke-Colt" or "Lunch Box Colt") being the most sought after. German forces also used captured M1911A1 pistols, using the designation "Pistole 660(a)".[17] The M1911 pattern formed the basis for the Argentine Ballester-Molina and certain Spanish Star and Llama pistols made after 1922.

General Officer's Model[]

From 1943 to 1945 a fine-grade russet-leather M1916 pistol belt set was issued to some generals in the US Army. It was composed of a leather belt, leather enclosed flap-holster with braided leather tie-down leg strap, leather two-pocket magazine pouch, and a rope neck lanyard. The metal buckle and fittings were in gilded brass. The buckle had the seal of the United States on the center (or "male") piece and a laurel wreath on the circular (or "female") piece. The pistol was a standard-issue M1911A1 that came with a cleaning kit and three magazines.

From 1972 to 1981 a modified M1911A1 called the RIA M15 General Officer's Model was issued to General Officers in the US Army and US Air Force. From 1982 to 1986 the regular M1911A1 was issued. Both came with a black leather belt, open holster with retaining strap, and a two-pocket magazine pouch. The metal buckle and fittings were similar to the M1916 General Officer's Model except it came in gold metal for the Army and in silver metal for the Air Force.

In 1986, the M15 and M1911A1 were replaced with the Beretta M9, which is the current sidearm issued to General Officers in the Army and Air Force.

Replacement for most uses[]

After World War II, the M1911 continued to be a mainstay of the United States Armed Forces in the Korean War and the Vietnam War. It was used during Desert Storm in specialized U.S. Army units and U.S. Navy Mobile Construction Battalions (Seabees), and has seen service in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, with U.S. Army Special Forces Groups and Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance Companies.[18]

However, by the late 1970s the M1911A1 was acknowledged to be showing its age. Under political pressure from Congress to standardize on a single modern pistol design, the U.S. Air Force ran a Joint Service Small Arms Program to select a new semi-automatic pistol using the NATO-standard 9 mm Parabellum pistol cartridge. After trials, the Beretta 92S-1 was chosen. The Army contested this result and subsequently ran its own competition in 1981, the XM9 trials, eventually leading to the official adoption of the Beretta 92F on January 14, 1985. By the later 1980s production was ramping up despite a controversial XM9 retrial and a separate XM10 reconfirmation that was boycotted by some entrants of the original trials, cracks in the frames of some pre-M9 Beretta-produced pistols, and despite a problem with slide separation using higher-than-specified-pressure rounds that resulted in injuries to some U.S. Navy special operations operatives. This last issue resulted in an updated model that includes additional protection for the user, the 92FS, and updates to the ammunition used.[19]

By the early 1990s, most M1911A1s had been replaced by the M9, though a limited number remain in use by special units. The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) in particular were noted for continuing the use of M1911 pistols for selected personnel in MEU(SOC) and reconnaissance units (though the USMC also purchased over 50,000 M9 pistols). For its part, the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) issued a requirement for a .45 ACP pistol in the Offensive Handgun Weapon System (OHWS) trials. This resulted in the Heckler & Koch OHWS becoming the MK23 Mod 0 Offensive Handgun Weapon System (itself being heavily based on the 1911's basic field strip), beating the Colt OHWS, a much modified M1911. Dissatisfaction with the stopping power of the 9 mm Parabellum cartridge used in the Beretta M9 has actually promoted re-adoption of pistols based on the .45 ACP cartridge such as the M1911 design, along with other pistols, among USSOCOM units in recent years, though the M9 remains predominant both within SOCOM and in the U.S. military in general.[18]

Current users in US[]

Many military and law enforcement organizations in the United States and other countries continue to use (often modified) M1911A1 pistols including Marine Corps Special Operations Command, Los Angeles Police Department SWAT. and L.A.P.D. S.I.S., the FBI Hostage Rescue Team, F.B.I. regional S.W.A.T. teams, and 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment—Delta (Delta Force). The Tacoma, Washington Police Department selected the Kimber Pro Carry II or Pro Carry II HD as optional, department supplied weapons available to its officers.[20]

The M1911A1 is popular among the general public in the United States for practical and recreational purposes. The pistol is commonly used for concealed carry thanks in part to a single-stack magazine (which makes for a thinner pistol that is therefore easier to conceal), personal defense, target shooting, and competition. Numerous aftermarket accessories allow users to customize the pistol to their liking. There are a growing number of manufacturers of M1911-type pistols and the model continues to be quite popular for its reliability, simplicity, and patriotic appeal. Various tactical, target, and compact models are available. Price ranges from a low end of around $400 for basic pistols imported from the Philippines or Turkey (Armscor, Tisas, Rock Island Armory, Girsan, STI Spartan) to more than $4,000 for the best competition or tactical versions (Wilson Combat, Ed Brown, Les Baer, Nighthawk Custom, and STI International.[21]).

Due to an increased demand for M1911 pistols among Army Special Operations units, who are known to field a variety of M1911 pistols, the Army Marksmanship Unit began looking to develop a new generation of M1911s and launched the M1911-A2 project in late 2004.[2] The goal was to produce a minimum of seven variants with various sights, internal and external extractors, flat and arched mainspring housings, integral and add-on magazine wells, a variety of finishes and other options, with the idea of providing the end-user a selection from which to select the features that best fit their missions.[2] The AMU performed a well received demonstration of the first group of pistols to the Marine Corps at Quantico and various Special Operations units at Ft. Bragg and other locations.[2] The project provided a feasibility study with insight into future projects.[2] Models were loaned to various Special Operations units, the results of which are classified. An RFP was issued for a Joint Combat Pistol but it was ultimately canceled.[2] Currently units are experimenting with an M1911 platform in .40 which will incorporate lessons learned from the A2 project. Ultimately, the M1911A2 project provided a test bed for improving existing M1911s. An improved M1911 variant becoming available in the future is a possibility.[2]

The Springfield Custom Professional Model 1911A1 pistol is produced under contract by Springfield Armory for the FBI regional SWAT teams and the Hostage Rescue Team.[22] This pistol is made in batches on a regular basis by the Springfield Custom Shop, and a few examples from most runs are made available for sale to the general public at a selling price of approximately US$2,700 each.

MEU(SOC) pistol[]

Main article: MEU(SOC) pistol

Marine Expeditionary Units formerly issued M1911s to Force Recon units.[23] Hand-selected Colt M1911A1 frames were gutted, deburred, and prepared for additional use by the USMC Precision Weapon Section (PWS) at Marine Corps Base Quantico.[23] They were then assembled with after-market grip safeties, ambidextrous thumb safeties, triggers, improved high-visibility sights, accurized barrels, grips, and improved Wilson magazines.[24] These hand-made pistols were tuned to specifications and preferences of end users.[25]

In the late 1980s, the Marines laid out a series of specifications and improvements to make Browning's design ready for 21st century combat, many of which have been included in MEU (SOC) pistol designs, but design and supply time was limited.[25] Discovering that the Los Angeles Police Department was pleased with their special Kimber M1911 pistols, a single source request was issued to Kimber for just such a pistol despite the imminent release of their TLE/RLII models.[26] Kimber shortly began producing a limited number of what would be later termed the Interim Close Quarters Battle pistol (ICQB). Maintaining the simple recoil assembly, 5-inch barrel (though using a stainless steel match grade barrel), and internal extractor, the ICQB is not much different from Browning's original design.[26]

In late July 2012, the U.S. Marines placed a $22.5 million order for 12,000 M1911 pistols for MEU(SOC) forces.[4] The new 1911 was designated M45A1 or "Close Quarters Battle Pistol" CQBP. The M45A1 features a dual recoil spring assembly, Picatinny rails and is cerakoted tan in color.

Other users over the world[]

Numbers of Colt M1911s were used by the UK Royal Navy as sidearms during World War I in .455 Webley Automatic caliber.[10] The pistols were then transferred to the UK Royal Air Force where they saw use in limited numbers up until the end of World War II as sidearms for air crew in event of bailing out in enemy territory.[10] Some units of the South Korean Air Force still use these original batches as officers' sidearms.

Norway used the Kongsberg Colt which was a license produced variant and is recognized by the unique slide catch. Many Spanish firearms manufacturers produced pistols derived from the 1911, such as the STAR Model B, the ASTRA 1911PL, and the Llama Model IX, just to name a few.[27] Argentina produced a licensed copy, the Model 1927 Sistema Colt, which eventually led to production of the cheaper Ballester-Molina, which resembles the 1911, but is not actually based on it. The German Volkssturm used captured M1911s at the end of World War II under the weapon code P.660(a), in which the alphabet means "Amerika", the weapons' origin country.[28][29]

The Brazilian company IMBEL (Indústria de Material Bélico do Brasil) still produces the .45 in several variants for military and law enforcement uses.The Greek Hellenic Army issues the World War II production American M1911 as sidearm. These pistols are supplied as military aid in 1946 and afterward as the U.S. aided Greece against Communist expansion.[30] The Royal Thai Army and Royal Thai Police uses the Type 86, the Thai copy of the M1911 chambered in the .45 ACP round,[31] and still uses USGI M1911s supplied as military aid during the Vietnam War era while Rapid Action Battalion (RAB Forces), an anti-terrorist police tactical team in Bangladesh uses this weapon.[32] The Armed Forces of the Philippines issues Mil-spec M1911A1 pistols as a sidearm to the special forces, military police and officers. These pistols are mostly produced by Colt, though some of them are produced locally by Armscor, a Philippine company specialized in making 1911-style pistols. The Indonesian Army issued a locally produced version of the Springfield M1911, chambered in .45 ACP along with the Pindad P1, the locally manufactured Browning Hi-Power pistol as the standard issue sidearm. A Chinese Arms manufacturer, Norinco, exports a clone of the M1911A1 for civilian purchase as the M-1911A1 and the high-capacity NP-30, as well 9mm variants the NP-28 and NP-29. Norinco also manufactured conversion kits to chamber the 7.62x25mm Tokarev round after the Korean War.[31]

As of 2013, the pistol is made under license instead of copying with Colt manufacturing machinery, due to an agreement between Norinco and Colt in order to stop Norinco from producing the Norinco CQ rifle. Importation into the United States was blocked by trade rules in 1993 but Norinco still manage to import the weapon into Canada and successfully adopted by IPSC shooters, gunsmiths and firearms enthusiasts there because of the cheaper price of the pistol than the other M1911s. In the 1950s, the Republic of China Army used original M1911A1s, and the batches are now still used by some forces. In 1962, Taiwan copied the M1911A1 as the T51 pistol, and it saw limited use in the Army. After that, the T51 was improved and introduced for export as the T51K1. Now the pistols in service are replaced by locally-made Beretta 92 pistols- the T75 pistol.

Civilian models[]

  • Colt Government Mk. IV Series 70 (1970–1983): Introduced the accurized Collet Barrel Bushing (1970–1988).
  • Colt Government Mk. IV Series 80 (1983–1988): Introduced an internal firing pin safety.
  • Colt M1991A1 (1991–2001 ORM; 2001–present NRM): A hybrid of the M1911A1 military model redesigned to use the slide of the Mk. IV Model 80. The 1991–2001 model used the old Colt rollmark engraved on the slide. The 2001 model introduced a new rollmark engraving.

Custom models[]

Since its inception, the M1911 has lent itself to easy customization. Replacement sights, grips, and other aftermarket accessories are the most commonly offered parts. Since the 1950s and the rise of competitive pistol shooting, many companies have been offering the M1911 as a base model for major customization. These modifications can range from changing the external finish, checkering the frame, and hand fitting custom hammers, triggers, and sears. Some modifications include installing compensators and the addition of accessories such as tactical lights and even scopes.[33] A common modification of John Moses Browning's design is to use a full-length guide rod that runs the full length of the recoil spring. This adds weight to the front of the pistol, but does not increase accuracy, and does make the pistol slightly more difficult to disassemble.[34] Custom guns can cost over $5000 and are built from the ground up or on existing base models.[35] The main companies offering custom M1911s are: Magnum Research, Springfield Custom Shop, Ed Brown, STI International, Nighthawk Custom, Wilson Combat, Les Baer and Astra Arms in Switzerland. ISPC models are offered by both Strayer Voigt Inc (Infinity Firearms) and STI International.

Design[]

Browning's basic M1911 design has seen very little change throughout its production life.[1] The basic principle of the pistol is recoil operation.[1] As the expanding combustion gases force the bullet down the barrel, they give reverse momentum to the slide and barrel which are locked together during this portion of the firing cycle. After the bullet has left the barrel, the slide and barrel continue rearward a short distance.[1]

At this point, a link pivots the rear of the barrel down, out of locking recesses in the slide, and the barrel is stopped by contact of the lower barrel lugs against the frame's vertical impact surface. As the slide continues rearward, a claw extractor pulls the spent casing from the firing chamber and an ejector strikes the rear of the case, pivoting it out and away from the pistol. The slide stops and is then propelled forward by a spring to strip a fresh cartridge from the magazine and feed it into the firing chamber. At the forward end of its travel, the slide locks into the barrel and is ready to fire again.[1]

The military mandated a grip safety and a manual safety.[1] A grip safety, sear disconnect, slide stop, half cock position, and manual safety (located on the left rear of the frame) are on all standard M1911A1s.[1] Several companies have developed a firing pin block safety. Colt's 80 series uses a trigger operated one and several other manufacturers, including Kimber and Smith & Wesson, use a Swartz firing-pin safety, which is operated by the grip safety.[36][37] Language cautioning against placing the index finger along the side of the gun to assist in aiming was included in the initial M1911 manual, and later manuals up to the 1940s.[38]

The same basic design has been offered commercially and has been used by other militaries. In addition to the .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol), models chambered for .38 Super, 9 mm Parabellum, 7.65mm Parabellum, 9mm Steyr,[39].400 Corbon, and other cartridges were offered. The M1911 was developed from earlier Colt designs firing rounds such as .38 ACP. The design beat out many other contenders during the government's selection period, during the late 1890s and early 1900s, up to the pistol's adoption. The M1911 officially replaced a range of revolvers and pistols across branches of the U.S. armed forces, though a number of other designs have seen use in certain niches.[40]

Despite being challenged by newer and lighter weight pistol designs in .45 caliber, such as the Glock 21, the SIG Sauer P220 and the Heckler & KochUSP, the M1911 shows no signs of decreasing popularity and continues to be widely present in various competitive matches such as those of USPSA, IDPA, IPSC, and Bullseye.[2]

Users[]

Specifications[]

  • Cartridge: .45 ACP;
  • Other commercial and military derivatives: Other versions offered include .22, .38 Super, 9mm Parabellum, .40 S&W, 10mm Auto, .400 Corbon, .460 Rowland, .22 LR, .50 GI, .455 Webley, 9×23mm Winchester, and others. The most popular alternative versions are 9mm Parabellum (9×19mm), .38 Super and 10mm Auto.
  • Barrel: 5 in (127 mm) Government, 4.25 in (108 mm) Commander, and the 3.5 in (89 mm) Officer's ACP. Some modern "carry" guns have significantly shorter barrels and frames, while others use standard frames and extended slides with 6 in (152 mm) barrels
  • Rate of twist: 16 in (406 mm) per turn, or 1:35.5 calibers (.45 ACP)
  • Operation: Recoil-operated, closed breech, single action, semi-automatic
  • Weight (unloaded): 2 lb 7 oz (1.1 kg) (government model)
  • Height: 5.25 in (133 mm)
  • Length: 8.25 in (210 mm)
  • Capacity: 7+1 rounds (7 in standard-capacity magazine +1 in firing chamber); 8+1 in aftermarket standard-size magazine; 10+1 in extended and high capacity magazines.[52] Guns chambered in .38 Super and 9 mm have a 9+1 capacity. Some manufacturers, such as Armscor, Para Ordnance, Strayer Voigt Inc and STI International Inc, offer 1911-style pistols using double-stacked magazines with significantly larger capacities (typically 14 rounds). Colt makes their own 8 round magazines which they include with their Series 80 XSE models.
  • Safeties: A grip safety, sear disconnect, slide stop, a half cock position, and manual safety (located on the left rear of the frame) are on all standard M1911A1s. Several companies have developed a firing pin block. Colt's 80 series uses a trigger operated one and several other manufacturers (such as Smith & Wesson) use one operated by the grip safety.

Cultural impact[]

As of March 18, 2011, the state of Utah in the United States—as a way of honoring their native son, M1911 designer John Browning—adopted the Browning M1911 as the "official firearm of Utah".[53]

Similar pistols[]

See also[]

References[]

  1. 1.001.011.021.031.041.051.061.071.081.091.101.111.121.131.14 Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911 Technical Manual TM 9-1005-211-34 1964 edition. Pentagon Publishing. 1964. p. 64. ISBN 978-1-60170-013-1. 
  2. 2.02.12.22.32.42.52.62.7Garrett, Rob. "Army Marksmanship Unit: The Pipeline for Spec Ops Weapons". Harris Publications, Inc.. 
  3. ↑FM 23-35, 1940
  4. 4.04.14.2Vasquez, Maegan (28 July 2012). "Sticking to their guns: Marines place $22.5M order for the Colt .45 M1911". Fox News. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/07/28/marines-pay-22m-to-go-back-to-their-old-guns-colt-45-caliber-pistols/. Retrieved 20 August 2012. 
  5. ↑Ayoob, Massad (2007). The Gun Digest Book of Combat Handgunnery. Gun Digest Books. p. 7. ISBN 978-0-89689-525-6. 
  6. 6.06.1Taylor, Chuck (1981). Complete Book Of Combat Handgunning. Boulder, CO: Paladin Press. p. 200. ISBN 978-0-87364-327-6. 
  7. ↑Hogg, Ian V.; John Walter (2004). Pistols of the World (4 ed.). David & Charles. p. 225. ISBN 978-0-87349-460-1. 
  8. ↑Hogg (2004) p. 98
  9. ↑Linn, Brian McAllister. The Philippine War, 1899–1902 (Modern War Studies (Paperback)). University Press of Kansas. ISBN 978-0-7006-1225-3.
  10. 10.0010.0110.0210.0310.0410.0510.0610.0710.0810.0910.1010.1110.1210.1310.1410.1510.1610.1710.1810.19Poyer, Joseph; Craig Riesch; Karl Karash (2008). The Model 1911 and Model 1911A1 Military and Commercial Pistols. North Cape Publications. p. 544. ISBN 978-1-882391-46-2. 
  11. ↑Hallock, Kenneth R., Hallock's .45 Auto Handbook, Kenneth R. Hallock, 1980.
  12. ↑Hogg (2004) p. 83
  13. ↑Ness, Mark American Rifleman June 1983 p.58
  14. ↑Canfield, Bruce N. American Rifleman June 2005 p.26
  15. ↑Bishop, Chris (1998). The Encyclopedia of Weapons of World War II. New York: Orbis Publiishing Ltd. ISBN 0-7607-1022-8. 
  16. ↑"Singer Manufacturing Co. 1941 1911A1". http://www.coolgunsite.com/images/1911/singer1911a1.htm. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  17. ↑axishistory.com (2008-03-28). "Axis History Factbook: Handguns". http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=6764. Retrieved 2008-07-31. 
  18. 18.018.1Campbell, Robert K. (2011). The Shooter's Guide to the 1911: A Guide to the Greatest Pistol of All Time. Gun Digest Books. p. 99. ISBN 978-1-4402-1434-9. 
  19. ↑Malloy, John (2011). "The Colt 1911: The First Century". In Dan Shiedler. Gun Digest 2011. Krause. pp. 108–117. ISBN 978-1-4402-1337-3. 
  20. ↑Thurman, Russ (2009-06-02). "December 2001 Shooting Industry article". Findarticles.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-15. https://archive.is/I1tz. Retrieved 2009-11-05. 
  21. ↑Sweeney, Patrick (2010). 1911: the first 100 years. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-4402-1115-7. 
  22. Us FBI Academy Handbook. International Business Publications. 2002. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-7397-3185-7. 
  23. 23.023.1Clancy, Tom (1996). Marine: A Guided Tour of a Marine Expeditionary Unit. Berkeley, California: Berkeley Trade. pp. 64, 79–80. ISBN 978-0-425-15454-0. 
  24. ↑Hopkins, Cameron (03/01/2002). "Semper FI 1911 – Industry Insider". http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0BTT/is_200411/ai_82533214. 
  25. 25.025.1Johnston, Gary Paul.(2004)"One Good Pistol", Soldier of Fortune Magazine, December 2004, 62–67
  26. 26.026.1Rogers, Patrick A.(2003)"Marines New SOCOM Pistol", SWAT Magazine, December 2003, 52–57
  27. ↑"Firearm Review, June 2000". Cruffler.com. http://www.cruffler.com/review-june-00.html. Retrieved 2008-09-08. 
  28. ↑Scarlata, Paul (February 20, 2011). "Small Arms of the Deutscher Volkssturm". Shotgun News. p. 24. 
  29. ↑"Handguns". Axis History Factbook. http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=6764. Retrieved 2011-05-27. 
  30. 30.030.1"Greek Military". Greek Military. http://greekmilitary.net/greektroops.htm. Retrieved 2009-11-05. 
  31. 31.031.131.2Small Arms Illustrated, 2010.
  32. ↑"Bangladesh Military Forces M1911". bdmilitary.com. 2009. http://www.bdmilitary.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=101&Itemid=95. Retrieved 2009-08-13. 
  33. ↑Thompson, Leroy; Rene Smeets (October 1, 1993). Great Combat Handguns: A Guide to Using, Collecting and Training With Handguns. London: Arms & Armour Publication. p. 256. ISBN 978-1-85409-168-0. 
  34. ↑Charles E. Petty. "Full length guide rods – myth or magic?". American Handgunner. Archived from the original on 2012-07-08. https://archive.is/okJE 
  35. ↑Rauch, Walt (2002). Practically Speaking: An Illustrated Guide; the Game, Guns and Gear of the International Defensive Pistol Association. Rauch & Company, Ltd.. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-9663260-1-7. 
  36. ↑U.S. Patent 2,169,084 (1939)
  37. ↑Davis and Raynor(1976), Safe Pistols Made Even Safer, American Rifleman, Jan. 1976
  38. ↑1912 Military Manual on the 1911 (published in 1912)
  39. ↑Wiley Clapp. "The 1911: Not Just a .45". American Rifleman. http://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/the-1911-not-just-a-45/. Retrieved 08-25-2013. 
  40. ↑Hogg, Ian V.; John S. Weeks (2000). Military Small Arms of the 20th Century. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publication. pp. 85–86. ISBN 978-0-87341-824-9.
Sours: https://military.wikia.org/wiki/M1911_pistol
Original Colt 1911

Military Versions from 1912 to 1945.
Manufacturer/Serial Number/Date Made

Beginning of M1911:

1)  Colt: S/N 1 to 3190 = April 16, 1912 to May 31, 1912

2)  Colt: S/N 3190 to 7501 = May 31, 1912 to Oct. 10, 1912

  • (S/N 3501 to 3799 were first U.S.M.C. pistols made by Colt delivered June 6, 1912.)

3) Colt: S/N 7501 to (approximately) 20,000 = Oct. 10, 1912 to Jan. 1913

4) Colt: S/N (approx.) 20,000 to 83,856 = Jan. 1913 to Aug. 19, 1913

  • S/N 38,001 to 43,900 Navy Model (USS New York) = March 9, 1912 to March 5, 1915
  • S/N 43,901 to 44,000 Navy Model (USS Texas) = March 9, 1912 to March 5, 1915
  • S/N 36,401 to 37,650 U.S.M.C. Model made by Colt = July 9, 1913

5) Colt: S/N 83,856 to 89,801 = Aug. 19, 1913 to July 20, 1914

  • (S/N 83,901 to 84,400 U.S.M.C. Model = May 12, 1914)

6) Colt: S/N 89,801 to 108,601 = July 20, 1914 to Feb. 8, 1915

  • (S/N 96,001 to 97,537 Navy Model (U.S. Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y.) = March 9, 1912 to March 5, 1915)

7) Colt: S/N 108,601 to 290,000 = Feb. 8, 1915 to May, 1918

  • (S/N 109,501 to 110,000 Navy Model, S/N 223,953 to 223,991 Navy Model, S/N 232,001 to 233,600 Navy Model)
  • (S/N 151,187 to 151,986 U.S.M.C. Model, S/N 185,801 to 186,201 U.S.M.C. Model, S/N 209,587 to 210,386 U.S.M.C. Model, S/N 215,387 to 217,386 U.S.M.C. Model)

8) Colt/Springfield: S/N 128,617 to 133,186 = 1916 to 1924 ( These models are very hard to properly identify)

9) Colt: S/N 290,000 to 450,000 = May, 1918 to Oct. 24, 1918

10) Colt: S/N 450,000 to 629,500 = Oct. 24, 1918 to April 10, 1919

11) Springfield Armory: S/N 72,571 to 133,186 = April 1914 to April, 1917

12) Remington-UMC: S/N 1 to 15,000 = Aug. 10, 1918 to May 24, 1919

13) Remington-UMC: S/N 15,000 to 21,676 = Aug. 10, 1918 to May 24, 1919

14) North American Arms: S/N 1 to 100 & S/N’s 111, 222, 333, 444, 555 = July 1, 1918 to Dec. 4, 1918. They are very rare and rank in value with Singer models. ( None of these were reported shipped to any branch of the military but about 100 regular models and about 5 presentation models were manufactured in Quebec, Canada by the North American Arms Company, Ltd.)

15) A. J. Savage Munitions Co. was issued a contract on July 20, 1918 and canceled on Dec. 4, 1918. Some parts were made but no complete pistols. It is unknown for sure if any slides were made and no frames were made.

Beginning of M1911A1:

14) Colt ( Transition Models): S/N 700,000 to 710,000 = 1924

15) Colt: S/N 710,001 to 711,000 = Early 1937

16) Colt: S/N 711,001 to 712,350 = Mid to Late 1937

17) Colt: S/N 712,350 to 713,645 = 1938

18)Colt: S/N 713,646 to 717,281 = 1939

  • Begining in 1940, the slide’s muzzel end was hardened after the finish was applied but a color mis-match was suppose to be rejected.
  • From 1942 to 1945 all 1911A1 pistols should show a slight to very noticed mismatch of coloring on the muzzle end of slide, and from 1943 the slide lock notch area should also show some discoloration from hardening after the pistol’s finish was applied.

19) Colt: S/N 717,282 to 721,977 = 1940

20) Colt: S/N 721,977 to 756,733 = 1941

21) Colt: S/N 756,734 to 857,000 = 1942 (S/N’s 856,405 to 916,404 were also duplicated by Ithaca but will have “F.J.A.” Ithaca inspection initials.)

22) Colt: S/N 857,000 to 1,609,529 = 1943 (S/N’s 856,405 to 916,404 were duplicated by Ithaca look for “F.J.A.” Ithaca inspection initials. S/N’s 1,041,405 to 1,096,404 were duplicated by Union Switch & Signal. Look for “RCD” US&S inspection initials.)

23) Colt: (Commercial/Military Model) S/N 857,000 to 1,609,529 = 1943 (approx. 6,575 Commercial models were converted to military production. Colt stop it’s commercial production at S/N C215,083)

24) Colt: S/N 1,609,529 to 1,743,846 = 1944

25) Colt: S/N 2,244,804 to 2,380,013 = 1945

26) Remington Rand: S/N 916,405 to 955,000 = 1943

27) Remington Rand: S/N 955,001 to 980,000 = 1943

28) Remington Rand: S/N 980,001 to 995,000 = 1943

29) Remington Rand: S/N 995,000 to 1,041,404 = 1943

30) Remington Rand: S/N 1,279,699 to 1,441,430 = 1943

31) Remington Rand: S/N 1,471,431 to 1,609,528 = 1943

32) Remington Rand: S/N 1,743,847 to 1,816,641 = 1944

33) Remington Rand: S/N 1,890,504 to 2,075,103 = 1944

34) Remington Rand: S/N 2,134,404 to 2,244,803 = 1945

35) Remington Rand: S/N 2,380,014 to 2,619,013 = 1945

36) Ithaca: S/N 856,405 to 900,000 = 1943 ( S/N’s 856,101 to 958,100 were duplicated by Colt, look for “G.H.D.” or “W.B.” Colt inspection initials.)

37) Ithaca: S/N 900,001 to 914,000 = 1943

38) Ithaca: S/N 914,000 to 916,404 = 1943

39) Ithaca: S/N 1,208,674 to 1,279,673 = 1943

40) Ithaca: S/N 1,441,431 to 1,471,430 = 1943

41) Ithaca: S/N 1,816,642 to 1,890,503 = 1944

42) Ithaca: S/N 2,075,104 to 2,134,403 = 1945

43) Ithaca: S/N 2,619,014 to 2,693,613 = 1945

44) Singer: S/N S800001 to S800500 = 1941 ( Use great care in evaluating these. They are very rare and valuable. This pistol is also counterfeited the most.) Slide markings are: S. MFG. CO. ELIZABETH,N.J., U.S.A.

45) Union Switch & Signal: S/N 1,041,405 to 1,060,000 = 1943

46) Union Switch & Signal: S/N 1,060,000 to 1,096,404 = 1943 (S/N’s 1,088,726 to 1,092,896 were duplicated by Colt. Look for “G.H.D.” or “W.B.” Colt inspection initials.)

Special Versions:

1) Springfield Armory: U.S. ARMY NATIONAL MATCH = 1954 to 1967 (Very hard to identify. Early 1954 models looked like regular 1911A1 and later versions usually had adjustable sights.)

2) U.S. AIR FORCE MATCH = 1958 to 1970 ( Produced by U.S.A.F. Gunsmiths. Very hard to identify except should have AFPG stamped on frame. A M1911A1 similar to Army National Match.)

3) Colt “ACE”: Caliber = .22 Long Rifle S/N 1 to 10,935 = April 1931 to July 1941 (The last 190 or so were assembled from spare parts in 1947) Parts only partially interchangable with a .45 caliber M1911A1 pistol.

4) Colt Service Model “ACE” : Caliber .22 Long Rifle S/N SM 1 to SM 3,836 = Feb. 1936 to Jan. 1943 ( Between 1935 and Sept. 1945, 11,961 Colt Service Model “ACE” pistols were made and their parts were fully interchangable with the .45 caliber
M1911A1.

5) Colt Service Model “ACE” : S/N SM 3846 to SM 13,803 = April 1945 to Sept. 1945 ( Between 1938 and Oct. 1946, a total of 2149 .22-.45 conversion units were made to convert .45 caliber pistols to .22 caliber. They were: S/N U1 to U2670. From 1938 to 1940, .45-.22 conversion units were made to convert Service Model “ACE” .22 caliber pistols to .45 ACP. They were: S/N U1 to U112.)

Foreign Service Models:

1) Colt M1911 Canadian Contract: S/N C5400 to C16599 = Sept. to Nov., 1914 ( Only 5000 pistols in this serial number range were shipped to Canada.) Caliber .45 ACP

2) Colt M1911A1 Canadian Contract: S/N 930,000 to 936,000 = 1943 ( 1,515 military model pistols were shipped to Canada through the Lend-Leased Act from this serial number range.) Caliber .45 ACP

3) Colt M1911 British Contract: S/N W29117 to W97000 and S/N C29 to C74,200 = May 1912 to April 1919 (Approx. 17,500 pistols were shipped to England. Serial numbers that begin with a “C” were .45 ACP and serial numbers that begin with a “W” were .455 Webley calibers.

4) Colt M1911 British RAF Contract: S/N W91,100 to W110,696 = Jan. 22, 1918 to April 28, 1919 (Approx. 10,000 pistols were shipped to the Royal Air Force from this serial number range and were .455 Webley caliber.)

5) British M1911A1 WW II Lend-Lease: From all S/N’s of U.S. M1911A1 models = March 11, 1941 through the rest of WW II ( The U.S. furnished 39,592 pistols to Britain through the Lend-Lease Act.)

6) Colt M1911 Russian Contract: S/N C23000 to C89000 = Feb. 19, 1916 to Jan. 18, 1917 ( Russia purchased 51,000 M1911 .45 ACP pistols during WW I. from this serial number range. Russia purchased more M1911 pistols than any other country besides the U.S.) Regular commercial model Colt except has “English Order” mark in Russian on left side of frame.

7) Colt M1911 Norwegian: Colt S/N C18501 to C18850 and Norway S/N 1 to 5000 = June 1915 to WW II (400 Colt 1911’s .45 caliber purchased and issued to Norwegian Navy. May 1917, 300 Colt 1911 .45ACP pistols purchased in 1915. In 1917, Norway obtained licence to manufacture it’s M1911 pistols. The first they made had “COLT AUT PISTOL M/1912” on the slides and then at S/N 100 this changed to “11.25 m/m AUT. PISTOL M/1914” on the slides.

8) Colt M1911 Argentine: S/N C6201 to C11621 = 1914, S/N C20,001 to C21000 = 1916 S/N C86790 to C116000 = 1919 ( 321 shipped in 1914 marked on right side of slide with “MARINA ARGENTINA”. In 1915 another 1000 shipped within above S/N range. In 1919 another 400 M1911 Colts shipped in above S/N range. Imported into the U.S. in 1960 as surplus but very rare in any condition.)

9) Colt M1911A1 Argentine Modelo 1927: S/N 1 to 10,000 = July 28, 1927 to Feb. 16, 1928 ( Marked on slide with ” COLT CAL. 45 MOD. 1927″ and S/N’s stamped on top of slide in Colt’s italic numbers.) SYST. COLT pistols made by Argintina under licence from Colt marked on right of slide with “EJERCITO ARGENTINO / SIST. COLT CAL 11.25 mm. Model 1927”. Other M1911A1 pistols made in Argintina at Fabrica Militar de Armas Portatiles, Rosario, Argintina S/N 10,001 to 112,000

10) Colt M1911 MEXICAN: After WW I, Mexico procured an unknown number of M1911 pistols made by Colt. These are rare because of Mexico’s strict penalties for illegal possession of military arms (ON SPOT EXECUTION). Very few made it to U.S. and would have a “C” prefix serial numbers. May have “EJERCITO MEXICANO” on right side of slide.

 


 

Colt Commercial Production: Govt. Model: 1912 to 1981

Model 1911
Serial Numbers – Date – Number Made

S/N C1 to C1899 – 1912 – 1899
S/N C1900 to C5399 – 1913 – 3500
S/N C5400 to C16599 – 1914 – 11,200
S/N C16600 to C27599 – 1915 – 11,000
S/N C27600 to C74999 – 1916 – 47,400
S/N C75000 to C98999 – 1917 – 24,000
S/N C99000 to C105999 – 1918 – 7000
S/N C106000 to C120999 – 1919 – 15,000
S/N C121000 to C126999 – 1920 – 6000
S/N C127000 to C128999 – 1921 – 2000
S/N C129000 to C129999 – 1922 – 1000
S/N C130000 to C133999 – 1923 – 4000

Some special military orders and military contractor orders were made.

  • The following pistols were shipped to Major Cyrus S. Radford, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, on Feb. 13, 1917. with a prefix of 1 to 25 added to serial numbers.
  • S/N’s 1-C92505, 2-C92332, 3-C92227, 4-C91632, 5-C91739, 6-C91936, 7-C92359, 8-C91710, 9-C92326, 10-C92290, 11-C92239, 12-C92335, 13-C92291, 14-C92250, 15-C92347, 16-C92244, 17-C92343, 18-C92249, 19-C92156, 20-C92337, 21-C92358, 22-C92245, 24-C92243, 25-C92294
  • S/N C201069 shipped to Springfield Armory on Sept. 28, 1919 for prototype tests.

__________________________________________________________________

Model 1911A1
Serial Numbers – Date – Number Made

S/N C135000 to C139999 – 1924 – 5000
S/N C140000 to 144999 – 1925 – 5000
S/N C145000 to C150999 – 1926 – 6000
S/N C151000 to C151999 – 1927 – 1000
S/N C152000 to C154999 – 1928 – 3000
S/N C155000 to C155999 – 1929 – 1000
S/N C156000 to C158999 – 1930 – 3000
S/N C159000 to C160999 – 1931 – 2000
S/N C161000 to C164799 – 1932 – 3800
S/N C164800 to C174599 – 1933 – 9800
S/N C174600 to C177999 – 1934 – 3400
S/N C178000 to C179799 – 1935 – 1800
S/N C179800 to C183199 – 1936 – 3400
S/N C183200 to C188699 – 1937 – 5500
S/N C188700 to C189599 – 1938 – 900
S/N C189600 to C198899 – 1939 – 9300
S/N C198900 to C199299 – 1940 – 400
S/N C199300 to C208799 – 1941 – 9500
S/N C208800 to C215018 – 1942 – 6219

  • Production Stopped because of World War II. Commercial models converted to military use except for limited production of Service Model “ACE” with S/N’s around SM2715.
  • .22 to .45 Conversion Units made from S/N U1400 to 1700.
  • In 1943, commercial models used to fill military orders. A limited amount of Super 38 & Super Match 38 produced. .22 to .45 Conversion Units made S/N U1701 to S/N U1750.
  • In 1944 no commercial peroduction of any kind recorded.
  • S/N SM3725 to SM13803 Service Model “ACE” .22 made, some gaps in numbering
  • produced in 1945. Commercial production resumed in 1946.

S/N C221001 to C222000 – 1946 – 1000
S/N C222001 to C231999 – 1947 – 9999
S/N C232000 to C238500 – 1948 – 6501
S/N C238501 to C240000 – 1949 – 1500
S/N C240001 to 247700C – 1950 – 7700
S/N 247701C to 253179C – 1951 – 5479
S/N 253180C to 259549C – 1952 – 6370
S/N 259550C to 266349C – 1953 – 6800
S/N 266350C to 270549C – 1954 – 4200
S/N 270550C to 272549C – 1955 – 2000
S/N 272550C to 276699C – 1956 – 4150
S/N 276700C to 281999C – 1957 – 5300
S/N 282000C to 283799C – 1958 – 1800
S/N 283800C to 285799C – 1959 – 2000
S/N 285800C to 287999C – 1960 – 2200
S/N 288000C to 289849C – 1961 – 1850
S/N 289850C to 291299C – 1962 – 1450
S/N 291300C to 293799C – 1963 – 2500
S/N 293800C to 295999C – 1964 – 2200
S/N 296000C to 300299C – 1965 – 4300
S/N 300300C to 308499C – 1966 – 8200
S/N 308500C to 315599C – 1967 – 7100
S/N 315600C to 324499C – 1968 – 8900
S/N 324500C to 332649C – 1969 – 8150
S/N 332650C to 336169C – 1970 -3520
During 1970 the change to the new series “70” begins and serial numbers changed also.
S/N 70G01001 to 70G05550 – 1970 – 4550
S/N 70G05551 to 70G18000 – 1971 – 12,450
S/N 70G18001 to 70G34400 – 1972 – 16,400
S/N 70G34401 to 70G43000 – 1973 – 8600
S/N 70G43001 to 70G73000 – 1974 – 30,000
S/N 70G73001 to 70G88900 – 1975 – 15,900
S/N 70G88901 to 70G99999 – 1976 – 11,099
During 1976 a range change of serial number begins.
S/N 01001G70 to 13900G70 – 1976 – 12,900
S/N 13901G70 to 45199G70 – 1977 – 31,299
S/N 45200G70 to 89185G70 – 1978 – 43,986
S/N 89186G70 to 99999G70 – 1979 – 10,813
During 1979 a range change of serial numbers begins on March 20, 1979.
S/N 01000B70 to 30008B70 – 1979 – 29,008
S/N 30009B70 to 72989B70 – 1980 – 42,981
S/N 72990B70 to 99999B70 – 1981 – 27,009
During 1981 a range change of serial numbers begins on Oct. 17, 1981.
S/N 70B00001 to 70B11246 – 1981 – 11,246

Some special orders made for military or military contractors. These are as follows:

  • S/N C211458 Sept. 22, 1942 shipped to Scovill Manufacturing Co. Waterbury, Conn.
  • S/N’s C212147, C212332, C212486, C212495 Sept. 29, 1942 shipped to Winchester
  • Repeating Arms Co.
  • S/N’s C213341, C213242, C213343, C213345 May 27, 1942 shipped to Remington
  • Arms Co. Bridgeport, Conn.
  • S/N C214360 Jan. 2, 1945 Shipped to U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.
  • S/N’s C214752, C214753, C214754 April 3, 1942 Shipped to Winchester Repeating
  • Arms Co.
  • S/N C214833 Nov. 10, 1942 Shipped to Capt. A. H. Harris, Hartford Ord. District.
  • S/N C213905 Oct. 8, 1942 Shipped to J. A. Lorch, Washington, D.C.
  • S/N C214016 Oct. 9, 1942 Shipped to Dominion of Canada.

Army 1911 pistol

 


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Sours: https://sightm1911.com/1911Production.htm

1911 m1a1 colt

M1911 pistol

American semi-automatic pistol

Semi-automatic pistol

The M1911, also known as the Colt 1911, or the Colt Government, is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operatedpistol chambered for the .45 ACPcartridge.[7] The pistol's formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, which was adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam War era.[7]

Designed by John Browning, the M1911 is the best-known of his designs to use the short recoil principle in its basic design. The pistol was widely copied, and this operating system rose to become the preeminent type of the 20th century and of nearly all modern centerfire pistols. It is popular with civilian shooters in competitive events such as USPSA, IDPA, International Practical Shooting Confederation, and bullseye shooting. Compact variants are popular civilian concealed carry weapons in the U.S. because of the design's relatively slim width and the stopping power[11] of the .45 ACP cartridge.[12][13]

The U.S. military procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols during its service life. The pistol served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces from 1911 to 1985. It was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The M1911A1 was replaced by the adoption of the 9 mmBeretta M9 pistol as the standard U.S. military sidearm in 1985. However, the U.S. Army did not replace the M1911A1 with the Beretta M9 until October 1986, and due to the M1911's popularity among users has not been completely phased out. Modernized derivative variants of the M1911 are still in use by some units of the U.S. Army Special Forces, U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy.

History

Early history and adaptations

The M1911 pistol originated in the late 1890s as the result of a search for a suitable self-loading (or semi-automatic) pistol to replace the variety of revolvers then in service.[14] The United States was adopting new firearms at a phenomenal rate; several new pistols and two all-new service rifles (the M1892/96/98 Krag and M1895 Navy Lee), as well as a series of revolvers by Colt and Smith & Wesson for the Army and Navy, were adopted just in that decade. The next decade would see a similar pace, including the adoption of several more revolvers and an intensive search for a self-loading pistol that would culminate in the official adoption of the M1911 after the turn of the decade.[citation needed]

Hiram S. Maxim had designed a self-loading rifle in the 1880s, but was preoccupied with machine guns. Nevertheless, the application of his principle of using cartridge energy to reload led to several self-loading pistols in 1896. The designs caught the attention of various militaries, each of which began programs to find a suitable one for their forces. In the U.S., such a program would lead to a formal test at the turn of the 20th century.

During the end of 1899 and start of 1900, a test of self-loading pistols, including entries from Mauser (the C96 "Broomhandle"), Mannlicher (the Mannlicher M1894), and Colt (the Colt M1900), was conducted.[14]

This led to a purchase of 1,000 DWMLuger pistols, chambered in 7.65mm Luger, a bottlenecked cartridge. During field trials, these ran into some problems, especially with stopping power. Other governments had made similar complaints. Consequently, DWM produced an enlarged version of the round, the 9×19mm Parabellum (known in current military parlance as the 9×19mm NATO), a necked-up version of the 7.65 mm round. Fifty of these were tested as well by the U.S. Army in 1903.

American units fighting Tausūg guerrillas in the Moro Rebellion in Sulu during the Philippine–American War using the then-standard Colt M1892 revolver, .38 Long Colt, found it to be unsuitable for the rigors of jungle warfare, particularly in terms of stopping power, as the Moros had high battle morale and often used drugs to inhibit the sensation of pain.[17] The U.S. Army briefly reverted to using the M1873 single-action revolver in .45 Colt caliber, which had been standard during the late 19th century; the heavier bullet was found to be more effective against charging tribesmen.[18] The problems prompted the Chief of Ordnance, General William Crozier, to authorize further testing for a new service pistol.[18]

Following the 1904 Thompson-LaGarde pistol round effectiveness tests, Colonel John T. Thompson stated that the new pistol "should not be of less than .45 caliber" and would preferably be semi-automatic in operation.[18] This led to the 1906 trials of pistols from six firearms manufacturing companies (namely, Colt, Bergmann, Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM), Savage Arms Company, Knoble, Webley, and White-Merrill).[18]

Of the six designs submitted, three were eliminated early on, leaving only the Savage, Colt, and DWM designs chambered in the new .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) cartridge.[18] These three still had issues that needed correction, but only Colt and Savage resubmitted their designs. There is some debate over the reasons for DWM's withdrawal—some say they felt there was bias and that the DWM design was being used primarily as a "whipping boy" for the Savage and Colt pistols,[19] though this does not fit well with the earlier 1900 purchase of the DWM design over the Colt and Steyr entries. In any case, a series of field tests from 1907 to 1911 were held to decide between the Savage and Colt designs.[18] Both designs were improved between each round of testing, leading up to the final test before adoption.[18]

Among the areas of success for the Colt was a test at the end of 1910 attended by its designer, John Browning. 6000 rounds were fired from a single pistol over the course of 2 days. When the gun began to grow hot, it was simply immersed in water to cool it. The Colt gun passed with no reported malfunctions, while the Savage designs had 37.[18]

Service history

Following its success in trials, the Colt pistol was formally adopted by the Army on March 29, 1911, when it was designated Model of 1911, later changed to Model 1911, in 1917, and then M1911, in the mid-1920s. The Director of Civilian Marksmanship began manufacture of M1911 pistols for members of the National Rifle Association in August 1912. Approximately 100 pistols stamped "N.R.A." below the serial number were manufactured at Springfield Armory and by Colt.[20] The M1911 was formally adopted by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps in 1913. The .45 ACP "Model of 1911 U.S. Army" was used by both US Army Cavalry troops and infantry soldiers during the United States' Punitive Expedition into Mexico against Pancho Villa in 1916.[21]

World War I

By the beginning of 1917, a total of 68,533 M1911 pistols had been delivered to U.S. armed forces by Colt's Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company and the U.S. government's Springfield Armory. However, the need to greatly expand U.S. military forces and the resultant surge in demand for the firearm in World War I saw the expansion of manufacture to other contractors besides Colt and Springfield Armory, including Remington-UMC and North American Arms Co. of Quebec. Several other manufacturers were awarded contracts to produce the M1911, including the National Cash Register Company, the Savage Arms Company, the Caron Brothers Manufacturing of Montreal, the Burroughs Adding Machine Co., Winchester Repeating Arms Company, and the Lanston Monotype Company, but the signing of the Armistice resulted in the cancellation of the contracts before any pistols had been produced.

Interwar changes

Battlefield experience in World War I led to some more small external changes, completed in 1924. The new version received a modified type classification, M1911A1, in 1926 with a stipulation that M1911A1s should have serial numbers higher than 700,000 with lower serial numbers designated M1911.[24] The M1911A1 changes to the original design consisted of a shorter trigger, cutouts in the frame behind the trigger, an arched mainspring housing, a longer grip safety spur (to prevent hammer bite), a wider front sight, a shortened hammer spur, and simplified grip checkering (eliminating the "Double Diamond" reliefs).[18] These changes were subtle and largely intended to make the pistol easier to shoot for those with smaller hands. No significant internal changes were made, and parts remained interchangeable between the M1911 and the M1911A1.[18]

Working for the U.S. Ordnance Office, David Marshall Williams developed a .22 training version of the M1911 using a floating chamber to give the .22 long rifle rimfire recoil similar to the .45 version.[18] As the Colt Service Ace, this was available both as a pistol and as a conversion kit for .45 M1911 pistols.[18]

Before World War II, 500 M1911s were produced under license by the Norwegian arms factory Kongsberg Vaapenfabrikk, as Automatisk Pistol Model 1912. Then, production moved to a modified version designated Pistol Model 1914 and unofficially known as "Kongsberg Colt". The Pistol M/1914 is noted for its unusual extended slide stop which was specified by Norwegian ordnance authorities. 22,000 were produced between 1914 and 1940 but production continued after the German occupation of Norway in 1940 and 10,000 were produced for the German armed forces as Pistole 657 (n).

Between 1927 and 1966, 102,000 M1911 pistols were produced as Sistema Colt Modelo 1927 in Argentina, first by the Dirección General de Fabricaciones Militares. A similar gun, the Ballester–Molina, was also designed and produced.

The M1911 and M1911A1 pistols were also ordered from Colt or produced domestically in modified form by several other nations, including Brazil (M1937 contract pistol), Mexico (M1911 Mexican contract pistol and the Obregón pistol), and Spain (private manufacturers Star and Llama).

World War II

World War II and the years leading up to it created a great demand. During the war, about 1.9 million units were procured by the U.S. Government for all forces, production being undertaken by several manufacturers, including Remington Rand (900,000 produced), Colt (400,000), Ithaca Gun Company (400,000), Union Switch & Signal (50,000), and Singer (500). New M1911A1 pistols were given a parkerized metal finish instead of bluing, and the wood grip panels were replaced with panels made of brown plastic. The M1911A1 was a favored small arm of both US and allied military personnel during the war, in particular, the pistol was prized by some British commando units and Britain's highly covert Special Operations Executive, as well as South African Commonwealth forces.[26][27]

The 1911A1 pistol was produced in very large quantities during the war. At the end of hostilities the government cancelled all contracts for further production and made use of existing stocks of weapons to equip personnel. Many of these weapons had seen service use, and had to be rebuilt and refinished prior to being issued. From the mid-1920s to the mid-1950s thousands of 1911s and 1911A1s were refurbished at U.S. arsenals and service depots. These rebuilds consisted of anything from minor inspections to major overhauls. Pistols that were refurbished at government arsenals will usually be marked on the frame/receiver with the arsenal's initials, such as RIA for Rock Island Armory or SA for Springfield Armory.[citation needed]

Among collectors today, the Singer-produced pistols in particular are highly prized, commanding high prices even in poor condition.[29]

General Officer's Model

From 1943 to 1945 a fine-grade russet-leather M1916 pistol belt set was issued to some generals in the US Army. It was composed of a leather belt, leather enclosed flap-holster with braided leather tie-down leg strap, leather two-pocket magazine pouch, and a rope lanyard. The metal buckle and fittings were in gilded brass. The buckle had the seal of the U.S. on the center (or "male") piece and a laurel wreath on the circular (or "female") piece. The pistol was a standard-issue M1911A1 that came with a cleaning kit and three magazines.

From 1972 to 1981 a modified M1911A1 called the RIA M15 General Officer's Model was issued to general officers in the US Army and US Air Force. From 1982 to 1986 the regular M1911A1 was issued. Both came with a black leather belt, open holster with retaining strap, and a two-pocket magazine pouch. The metal buckle and fittings were similar to the M1916 General Officer's Model except it came in gold metal for the Army and in silver metal for the Air Force.

Post–World War II usage

After World War II, the M1911 continued to be a mainstay of the U.S. Armed Forces in the Korean War and the Vietnam War, where it was used extensively by tunnel rats.[30] It was used during Desert Storm in specialized U.S. Army units and U.S. Navy Mobile Construction Battalions (Seabees), and has seen service in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, with U.S. Army Special Forces Groups and Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance Companies.[31]

However, by the late 1970s, the M1911A1 was acknowledged to be showing its age. Under political pressure from Congress to standardize on a single modern pistol design, the U.S. Air Force ran a Joint Service Small Arms Program to select a new semi-automatic pistol using the NATO-standard 9 mm Parabellum pistol cartridge. After trials, the Beretta 92S-1 was chosen. The Army contested this result and subsequently ran its own competition in 1981, the XM9 trials, eventually leading to the official adoption of the Beretta 92F on January 14, 1985.[32][33][34] By the late 1980s production was ramping up despite a controversial XM9 retrial and a separate XM10 reconfirmation that was boycotted by some entrants of the original trials, cracks in the frames of some pre-M9 Beretta-produced pistols, and despite a problem with slide separation using higher-than-specified-pressure rounds that resulted in injuries to some U.S. Navy special operations operatives. This last issue resulted in an updated model that includes additional protection for the user, the 92FS, and updates to the ammunition used.[35] During the Gulf War of 1990–1991, M1911A1s were deployed with reserve component U.S. Army units sent to participate in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

By the early 1990s, most M1911A1s had been replaced by the Beretta M9, though a limited number remain in use by special units. The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) in particular were noted for continuing the use of M1911 pistols for selected personnel in MEU(SOC) and reconnaissance units (though the USMC also purchased over 50,000 M9 pistols.[citation needed]) For its part, the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) issued a requirement for a .45 ACP pistol in the Offensive Handgun Weapon System (OHWS) trials. This resulted in the Heckler & Koch OHWS becoming the MK23 Mod 0 Offensive Handgun Weapon System (itself being heavily based on the 1911's basic field strip), beating the Colt OHWS, a much-modified M1911. Dissatisfaction with the stopping power of the 9 mm Parabellum cartridge used in the Beretta M9 has actually promoted re-adoption of pistols based on the .45 ACP cartridge such as the M1911 design, along with other pistols, among USSOCOM units in recent years, though the M9 has been predominant both within SOCOM and in the U.S. military in general.[31] Both U.S. Army Special Forces Units and SFOD-D continue to use modernized M1911s.[citation needed]

Design

Cross-section diagram, with labeled parts, of original Model 1911 pistol, from official Army description as published in 1917.
Springfield Mil Spec field stripped

Browning's basic M1911 design has seen very little change throughout its production life.[7][page needed] The basic principle of the pistol is recoil operation.[7][page needed] As the expanding combustion gases force the bullet down the barrel, they give reverse momentum to the slide and barrel which are locked together during this portion of the firing cycle. After the bullet has left the barrel, the slide and barrel continue rearward a short distance.[7][page needed]

At this point, a link pivots the rear of the barrel down, out of locking recesses in the slide, and the barrel is stopped by making contact with the lower barrel lugs against the frame. As the slide continues rearward, a claw extractor pulls the spent casing from the firing chamber and an ejector strikes the rear of the case, pivoting it out and away from the pistol through the ejection port. The slide stops its rearward motion then, and is propelled forward again by the recoil spring to strip a fresh cartridge from the magazine and feed it into the firing chamber. At the forward end of its travel, the slide locks into the barrel and is ready to fire again. However, if the fired round was the last round in the magazine, the slide will lock in the rearward position, which notifies the shooter to reload by ejecting the empty magazine and inserting a loaded magazine, and facilitates (by being rearwards) reloading the chamber, which is accomplished by either pulling the slide back slightly and releasing, or by pushing down on the slide stop, which releases the slide to move forward under spring pressure, strip a fresh cartridge from the magazine and feed it into the firing chamber.[7][page needed]

There are no fasteners of any type in the 1911 design, excepting the grip screws. The main components of the gun are held in place by the force of the main spring. The pistol can be "field stripped" by partially retracting the slide, removing the slide stop, and subsequently removing the barrel bushing. Full disassembly (and subsequent reassembly) of the pistol to its component parts can be accomplished using several manually removed components as tools to complete the disassembly.[citation needed]

The military mandated a grip safety and a manual safety.[7][page needed] A grip safety, sear disconnect, slide stop, half cock position, and manual safety (located on the left rear of the frame) are on all standard M1911A1s.[7] Several companies have developed a firing pin block safety. Colt's 80 series uses a trigger operated one and several other manufacturers, including Kimber and Smith & Wesson, use a Swartz firing-pin safety, which is operated by the grip safety.[36][37] Language cautioning against pulling the trigger with the second finger was included in the initial M1911 manual,[38] and later manuals up to the 1940s.

The same basic design has been offered commercially and has been used by other militaries. In addition to the .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol), models chambered for .38 Super, 9×19mm Parabellum, 7.65mm Parabellum, 9mm Steyr,[39].400 Corbon, and other cartridges were offered. The M1911 was developed from earlier Colt semi-automatic designs, firing rounds such as .38 ACP. The design beat out many other contenders during the government's selection period, during the late 1890s and early 1900s, up to the pistol's adoption. The M1911 officially replaced a range of revolvers and pistols across branches of the U.S. armed forces, though a number of other designs have seen use in certain niches.[40]

Despite being challenged by newer and lighter weight pistol designs in .45 caliber, such as the Glock 21, the SIG Sauer P220, the Springfield XD and the Heckler & Koch USP, the M1911 shows no signs of decreasing popularity and continues to be widely present in various competitive matches such as those of USPSA, IDPA, IPSC, and Bullseye.[9]

Versions

MEU(SOC) pistol

Main article: MEU(SOC) pistol

Marine Expeditionary Units formerly issued M1911s to Force Recon units.[41] Hand-selected Colt M1911A1 frames were gutted, deburred, and prepared for additional use by the USMC Precision Weapon Section (PWS) at Marine Corps Base Quantico.[41] They were then assembled with after-market grip safeties, ambidextrous thumb safeties, triggers, improved high-visibility sights, accurized barrels, grips, and improved Wilson magazines.[42] These hand-made pistols were tuned to specifications and preferences of end users.[43]

In the late 1980s, the Marines laid out a series of specifications and improvements to make Browning's design ready for 21st-century combat, many of which have been included in MEU(SOC) pistol designs, but design and supply time was limited.[43] Discovering that the Los Angeles Police Department was pleased with their special Kimber M1911 pistols, a single source request was issued to Kimber for just such a pistol despite the imminent release of their TLE/RLII models.[44] Kimber shortly began producing a limited number of what would be later termed the Interim Close Quarters Battle pistol (ICQB). Maintaining the simple recoil assembly, 5-inch barrel (though using a stainless steel match grade barrel), and internal extractor, the ICQB is not much different from Browning's original design.[44]

In July 2012, the U.S. Marines placed a $22.5 million order with Colt for 12,000 M1911 pistols for MEU(SOC) forces.[45] The new 1911 was designated M45A1 or "Close Quarters Battle Pistol" CQBP. The M45A1 features a dual recoil spring assembly, Picatinny rails and is cerakoted tan in color.

M45A1 pistols continue to see usage today with USMC Force Recon Battalions, in addition to other specialized USMC units.

Civilian models

A Colt M1991A1 Compact ORM pistol
A Colt M1991A1 Compact ORM pistol with slide locked back to expose bull barrel.
  • Colt Commander: In 1949 Colt began production of the Colt Commander, an aluminum-framed 1911 with a 4 ¼ inch barrel and a rounded hammer. It was developed in response to an Army requirement issued in 1949, for a lighter replacement for the M1911 pistol, for issue to officers. In 1970, Colt introduced the all-steel "Colt Combat Commander", with an optional model in satin nickel. To differentiate between the two models, the aluminum-framed model was renamed the "Lightweight Commander”.[citation needed]
  • Colt Government Mk. IV Series 70 (1970–1983): Introduced the accurized Split Barrel Bushing (collet bushing). The first 1000 prototypes in the serial number range 35800NM – 37025NM were marked BB on the barrel and the slide. Commander-sized pistols retained the solid bushing.[citation needed]
  • Colt Government Mk. IV Series 80 (1983–present): Introduced an internal firing pin safety and a new half-cock notch on the sear; pulling the trigger on these models while at half-cock will cause the hammer to drop. Models after 1988 returned to the solid barrel bushing due to concerns about breakages of collet bushings.[citation needed]
  • Colt Gold Cup National Match 1911/Mk. IV Series 70/Mk. IV Series 80 MKIV/Series 70 Gold Cup 75th Anniversary National Match/Camp Perry 1978. Limited to 200 pistols. (1983–1996) Gold Cup MKIV Series 80 National Match – .45 ACP, Colt-Elliason adjustable rear sight, fully adjustable Bomar-Style rear sight, target post front sight, spur hammer, wide target trigger, lowered and flared ejection port, National Match barrel, beveled top slide, wrap-around rubber stocks with nickel medallion.[46]
  • Colt 1991 Series (1991–2001 ORM; 2001–present NRM): A hybrid of the M1911A1 military model redesigned to use the slide of the Mk. IV Model 80; these models aimed at providing a more "mil-spec" pistol to be sold at a lower price than Colt's other 1911 models in order to compete with imported pistols from manufacturers such as Springfield Armory and Norinco. The 1991–2001 model used a large "M1991A1" roll mark engraved on the slide. The 2001 model introduced a new "Colt's Government Model" roll mark engraving. The 1991 series incorporates full-sized blued and stainless models in either .45 ACP or .38 Super, as well as blued and stainless Commander models in .45 ACP.[citation needed]

Custom models

Since its inception, the M1911 has lent itself to easy customization. Replacement sights, grips, and other aftermarket accessories are the most commonly offered parts. Since the 1950s and the rise of competitive pistol shooting, many companies have been offering the M1911 as a base model for major customization. These modifications can range from changing the external finish, checkering the frame, and hand fitting custom hammers, triggers, and sears. Some modifications include installing compensators and the addition of accessories such as tactical lights and even scopes.[47] A common modification of John Browning's design is to use a full-length guide rod that runs the full length of the recoil spring. This adds weight to the front of the pistol, but does not increase accuracy, and does make the pistol slightly more difficult to disassemble.[48] Custom guns can cost over $5,000 and are built from scratch or on existing base models.[49] The main companies offering custom M1911s are: Dan Wesson Firearms, Ed Brown, Les Baer, Nighthawk Custom, Springfield Custom Shop, STI International, and Wilson Combat.[50] IPSC models are offered by BUL Armory, Strayer Voigt Inc (Infinity Firearms), and STI International.

Users

Current users in the U.S.

Many military and law enforcement organizations in the U.S. and other countries continue to use (often modified) M1911A1 pistols including Los Angeles Police DepartmentSWAT and S.I.S., the FBI Hostage Rescue Team, FBI regional SWAT teams, and 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment—Delta (Delta Force).

A basic version of Smith & Wesson's SW1911 with user-installed Pachmayr grips

The M1911A1 is popular among the general public in the U.S. for practical and recreational purposes. The pistol is commonly used for concealed carry thanks in part to a single-stack magazine (which makes for a thinner pistol that is, therefore, easier to conceal), personal defense, target shooting, and competition as well as collections. Numerous aftermarket accessories allow users to customize the pistol to their liking. There are a growing number of manufacturers of M1911-type pistols and the model continues to be quite popular for its reliability, simplicity, and patriotic appeal. Various tactical, target and compact models are available. Price ranges from a low end of around $400 for basic pistols imported from the Philippines or Turkey (Armscor, Tisas, Rock Island Armory, Girsan, STI Spartan, Seraphim Armoury) to more than $4,000 for the best competition or tactical versions (Wilson Combat, Ed Brown, Les Baer, Nighthawk Custom, and STI International).[51]

Due to an increased demand for M1911 pistols among Army Special Operations units, who are known to field a variety of M1911 pistols, the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit began looking to develop a new generation of M1911s and launched the M1911-A2 project in late 2004.[9] The goal was to produce a minimum of seven variants with various sights, internal and external extractors, flat and arched mainspring housings, integral and add-on magazine wells, a variety of finishes and other options, with the idea of providing the end-user a selection from which to select the features that best fit their missions.[9] The AMU performed a well-received demonstration of the first group of pistols to the Marine Corps at Quantico and various Special Operations units at Ft. Bragg and other locations.[9] The project provided a feasibility study with insight into future projects.[9] Models were loaned to various Special Operations units, the results of which are classified. An RFP was issued for a Joint Combat Pistol but it was ultimately canceled.[9] Currently units are experimenting with an M1911 pistol in .40 S&W, which will incorporate lessons learned from the A2 project. Ultimately, the M1911A2 project provided a testbed for improving existing M1911s. An improved M1911 variant becoming available in the future is a possibility.[9]

The Springfield Custom Professional Model 1911A1 pistol is produced under contract by Springfield Armory for the FBI regional SWAT teams and the Hostage Rescue Team.[52] This pistol is made in batches on a regular basis by the Springfield Custom Shop, and a few examples from most runs are made available for sale to the general public at a selling price of approximately US$2,700 each.

International users

  • The Brazilian company IMBEL (Indústria de Material Bélico do Brasil) still produces the pistol in several variants for civilian, military and law enforcement uses in .45 ACP, .40 S&W, .380 ACP and 9 mm calibers. IMBEL also produces for US civilian market as the supplier to Springfield Armory.[citation needed]
  • The Canadian company Seraphim Armoury brands Filipino manufactured pistols in several models for domestic and export use. Pistols are available in .45 ACP and 9 mm calibers for civilian, military and law enforcement use.[citation needed]
  • A Chinese Arms manufacturer, Norinco, exports a clone of the M1911A1 for civilian purchase as the M1911A1 and the high-capacity NP-30, as well 9mm variants the NP-28 and NP-29. China has also manufactured conversion kits to chamber the 7.62×25mm Tokarev round following the Korean War.[53][page needed]
As of 2013, the pistol is made under license[citation needed] instead of copying with Colt manufacturing machinery, due to an agreement between Norinco and Colt in order to stop Norinco from producing the Norinco CQ rifle. Importation into the United States was blocked by trade rules in 1993 but Norinco still manages to import the weapon into Canada and successfully adopted by IPSC shooters, gunsmiths and firearms enthusiasts there because of the cheaper price of the pistol than the other M1911s.[citation needed]
  • The German Volkssturm used captured M1911s at the end of World War II under the weapon code P.660(a), in which the letter 'a' refers to "Amerika", the weapon's country of origin.[54]
  • Norway used the Kongsberg Colt which was a license-produced variant and is identified by the unique slide catch. Many Spanish firearms manufacturers produced pistols derived from 1911, such as the STAR Model B, the ASTRA 1911PL, and the Llama Model IX, to name just a few.[55]
  • Argentine Navy received 1,721 M1911 between 1914 and 1919. 21,616 were received for Argentine Armed Forces between 1914 and 1941. Later, some ex-US Navy Colts were transferred with ex-US ships. Argentina produced under license some 102,494 M1911A1s as Model 1927 Sistema Colt, which eventually led to production of the cheaper Ballester–Molina, which resembles the 1911.
  • The Armed Forces of the Philippines issues Mil-spec M1911A1 pistols as a sidearm to the special forces, military police, and officers. These pistols are mostly produced by Colt, though some of them are produced locally by Armscor, a Philippine company specialized in making 1911-style pistols. The Indonesian Army issued a locally produced version of the Colt M1911A1, chambered in .45 ACP along with the Pindad P1, the locally manufactured Browning Hi-Power pistol as the standard-issue sidearm.[citation needed]
  • In the 1950s, the Republic of China Army (Taiwan) used original M1911A1s, and the batches are now still used by some forces. In 1962, Taiwan copied the M1911A1 as the T51 pistol, and it saw limited use in the Army. After that, the T51 was improved and introduced for export as the T51K1. Now the pistols in service are replaced by locally-made Beretta 92 pistols- the T75 pistol.[citation needed]
  • The Royal Thai Army and Royal Thai Police uses the Type 86, the Thai copy of the M1911 chambered in the .45 ACP round,[53][page needed]
  • The Turkish Land Forces uses "MC 1911" Girsan made copy of M1911.[59]
  • Numbers of Colt M1911s were used by the Royal Navy as sidearms during World War I in .455 Webley Automatic caliber.[18] The pistols were then transferred to the Royal Air Force where they saw use in limited numbers up until the end of World War II as sidearms for aircrew in event of bailing out in enemy territory. The weapon also found use among the British airborne, commandos, Special Air Service, and Special Operations Executive[18]
  • Some units of the South Korean Air Force still use these original batches as officers' sidearms.

Current

Former

  •  Argentina: Manufactured M1911 pistols under license from 1945 to 1966 by Dirección General de Fabricaciones Militares.[citation needed]
  •  Austria[75]
  •  Belgium[citation needed]
  •  Canada: In both World Wars, Canadian officers had the option of privately purchasing their own sidearm and the M1911/M1911A1 was a popular choice. The joint Canadian-US First Special Service Force (aka "The Devil's Brigade") also used American infantry weapons, including the M1911A1.[76]
  •  Republic of China (1912-1949)[77]
  •  Cuba[4]
  •  El Salvador[78]
  •  Estonia: replaced by USP pistols[79]
  •  Ethiopian Empire: used by the Kagnew Battalion[citation needed]
  •  Finland: About 51,000 bought by Russian military from United States in years 1915–1917. But only relatively small number of these captured pistols ended up to hands of authorities after Finnish Civil War. Finnish military had about 120 pistols during World War 2, most of them were issued to field army.[80]
  •  France: 5,500 M1911 received during World War I, especially for tank units and trench raiders.Free French Forces received 19,325 Colts. Known in French service as Pistolet automatique 11 mm 4 (C.45) (Automatic pistol 11.4mm (calibre .45)). Both M1911 and M1911A1 pistols were used.[83]
  •  Democratic Republic of Georgia[84]
  •  Kingdom of Laos: Received M1911A1s from US during Laotian Civil War (1955-1975).[85]
  •  Luxembourg: In service with 1st Artillery Battalion 1963–1967.[86]
  •  Nazi Germany: Used captured pistols during World War II.[18]
  •  New Zealand: Used during WWII[87]
  •  Japan: After World War II, the Japan Self-Defense Forces and Police were provided 101,700 M1911A1s from the US.[88] These were used until the 1980s.[89]
  •  Netherlands: 50 received during World War I
  •  Norway:[18] 700 received during World War I Produced under license as Kongsberg Colt.
  •  Poland: Polish Armed Forces in the West used pistols during World War II.[citation needed]
  •  Russian Empire: 51,000 purchased between February 1916 and January 1917
  • Shanghai International Settlement: Colt M1911 and M1911A1s were used by non-Chinese members of the Shanghai Municipal Police from 1926
  •  South Vietnam[18]
  •  Soviet Union: Some M1911 pistols were captured during Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War and used in Red Army.[91][92] Extra 12,977 pistols were received as Lend-Lease during World War II. Conversion kits to chamber the 7.62×25mm Tokarev round are manufactured locally.
  •  United Kingdom: Some M1911s chambered for .455 Webley Automatic were supplied to the Royal Flying Corps during WWI. Saw service among elite and special forces during WWII in .45 and .455. Possibly still in use by UKSF.
  • Viet Cong: Crude clones used by VC guerrillas with some captured in the Vietnam War.[74]

State firearm

On March 18, 2011, the U.S. state of Utah—as a way of honoring M1911 designer John Browning, who was born and raised in the state—adopted the Browning M1911 as the "official firearm of Utah".[93]

Similar pistols

See also

References

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M1911_pistol
Colt WWII 1911 A1 20th Anniversary

Veronica once again looked at herself in the mirror, straightened her already perfect hairstyle. It's time. To be continued. E-mail of the author: mаco. tоro gmаil.

Now discussing:

I really really wanted to continue, but how could that be. Do I really have to let the unfamiliar commander of the traffic police pass through me and still it is not clear how many of. His employees. I havent had to do that yet.



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