Northwest aroostook maine

Northwest aroostook maine DEFAULT

Northwest Aroostook, Maine

Location of Northwest Aroostook, Maine

Northwest Aroostook is an unorganized territory in Aroostook County, Maine, United States. The population was 27 at the 2000 census.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the unorganized territory has a total area of 2,668.7 square miles (6,912.0 km²), of which, 2,629.0 square miles (6,809.2 km²) of it is land and 39.7 square miles (102.8 km²) of it (1.49%) is water.

There are seventy townships within the unorganized territory plus part of one that is shared with Square Lake. The northernmost point of Maine, Big Twenty Township is located in Northwest Aroostook.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 27 people, 12 households, and 5 families residing in the unorganized territory. The population density was 0.0 people per square mile (0.0/km²). There were 313 housing units at an average density of 0.1/sq mi (0.0/km²). The racial makeup of the unorganized territory was 96.30% White, and 3.70% Black or African American. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.70% of the population.

There were 12 households out of which 16.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, and 58.3% were non-families. 50.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.92 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the unorganized territory the population was spread out with 7.4% under the age of 18, 40.7% from 25 to 44, 14.8% from 45 to 64, and 37.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 200.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 212.5 males.

The median income for a household in the unorganized territory was $22,250, and the median income for a family was $21,750. Males had a median income of $13,750 versus $27,083 for females. The per capita income for the unorganized territory was $16,872. None of the population or the families was below the poverty line.

References

Coordinates: 46°50′56″N69°11′54″W / 46.84889°N 69.19833°W / 46.84889; -69.19833

Categories:
  • Unorganized territories in Maine
  • Populated places in Aroostook County, Maine
Sours: https://en-academic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/103407

 

Old10-28-2012, 11:54 AM
 

Location: I live wherever I am.

1,934 posts, read 4,290,328 times

Reputation: 3276

Reading maps of Maine, I see a big fat lot of NOTHING in the northwest section of the state. There are a bunch of seemingly very long roads that say "private road - permit and fee required", and NO TOWNS. What's up with that? Do people actually own land up there, in small tracts, or do the few landowners represented up there own like tens of thousands of acres?

If there are no towns, is there no property tax either?

I'm talking about places like northern Piscataquis County, western Aroostook County, etc. It seems like people only inhabit maybe 50% of Maine's surface area. Go to the main City-Data page for Maine, click on "All Towns and Villages" to show all of those markers on the state map, and look at the area that has no markers at all. That's what I'm talking about.

Can anyone tell me about that area?

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Old10-28-2012, 12:11 PM
 

Location: Maine

1,139 posts, read 1,758,784 times

Reputation: 1808

Quote:

Originally Posted by RomaniGypsyView Post

Reading maps of Maine, I see a big fat lot of NOTHING in the northwest section of the state. There are a bunch of seemingly very long roads that say "private road - permit and fee required", and NO TOWNS. What's up with that? Do people actually own land up there, in small tracts, or do the few landowners represented up there own like tens of thousands of acres?

If there are no towns, is there no property tax either?

I'm talking about places like northern Piscataquis County, western Aroostook County, etc. It seems like people only inhabit maybe 50% of Maine's surface area. Go to the main City-Data page for Maine, click on "All Towns and Villages" to show all of those markers on the state map, and look at the area that has no markers at all. That's what I'm talking about.

Can anyone tell me about that area?

A lot of that land is paper company land. It is open to the public in many areas for hunting, camping, and fishing. There are some ATV trails up there, but the logging trails are not open to ATVs, to my knowledge.

I don't know exactly where the gates are, but I know the Golden Road is a 100+ mile stretch of road from the Canadian Border all the way to Millinocket. You do have to pay a fee per personto cross the gates. If you make the trip, you must make sure your vehicle and tires are in good shape, and your tank is full of gas. It's a wilderness area up there. Also, logging trucks have the right of way everywhere, since it is logging territory. You are expected to pull over and get out of the way.

There are others here that would be more knowledgeable about the tax situations of unincorporated land. I believe you pay property taxes to the state in that case. Maine isn't going to pass up an opportunity to rob you of your money.
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Old10-28-2012, 12:33 PM
 

Location: Sacramento, CA/Dover-Foxcroft, ME

1,815 posts, read 3,151,540 times

Reputation: 2879

I found this about who owns Maine's forest.

Who Owns Maine's Forest?

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Old10-28-2012, 12:54 PM
 

1,594 posts, read 3,778,362 times

Reputation: 1096

The land you're looking at is unincorporated territory, meaning it isn't part of an incorporated town or city. The landowner pays property taxes to the state of Maine. Most folks call it the North Woods. If you look at eastern Maine away from the coast, you'll see much the same phenomenon.

There are some year-round dwellings there and quite a few seasonal places on land leased or bought from the big landowners. Those people also pay their property taxes to the state.

Originally the land was owned by the big paper companies, but they mostly sold their properties to investment companies in the 1980s and 1990s. The land was retained for its tree production rather than development. Irving is the largest landowner in the North Woods now, but its paper mills are in Canada.

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Old10-28-2012, 05:43 PM
 

Location: Northern Maine

10,263 posts, read 16,617,227 times

Reputation: 10909

Read the above posts with caution:

1. There is no paper company in Maine any more. It is all gone.

2. The correct term is "Unorganized Territory".

3. People do live there year round and there are still areas of private property. The people still here are hardy liberty loving folks.

4. The immense scope of the changes in Northern Maine in the last few years is not known or understood by the majority of Mainers. People will not intentionally mislead you. They just don't realize what has happened to us. As an example, in the late 1980s we had a spruce budworm epidemic that killed much of our spruce forests. The environmental industry said that the necessary salvage operations were evil corporations raping the land. Newspapers publish photos of a vast clear cut. The photos were taken in Siberia, but the impression was made. City people still have the idea that our forests are gone.

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Old10-28-2012, 06:40 PM
 

Location: Forests of Maine

33,157 posts, read 54,366,246 times

Reputation: 23637

52% of Maine is Unorganized Townships.

Every square foot of Maine is in some township. All townships in Maine have designations.

People do live in the Unorganized Townships of Maine.

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Old10-28-2012, 08:56 PM
 

468 posts, read 688,010 times

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Many of the roads are a cooperative effort of the multiple landowners. This entity controls access: North Maine Woods, Ashland, Maine

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Old10-28-2012, 11:07 PM
 

Location: Caribou, Me.

6,933 posts, read 5,020,646 times

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It's called the Big Woods. A few people live there, but very few. It's semi-wilderness.

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Old10-29-2012, 06:12 PM
 

Location: I live wherever I am.

1,934 posts, read 4,290,328 times

Reputation: 3276

Quote:

Originally Posted by maineguy8888View Post

It's called the Big Woods. A few people live there, but very few. It's semi-wilderness.

It sounds great, frankly, to live somewhere that is very sparsely populated but actually gets rain and isn't hotter than Hades in the summer. I would wonder... how do they get to their homes? Do they just suck it up and use those private permit roads?

And why do so few people live there? Why has there been so little demand for homestead property in that area that it hasn't seen an appreciable increase in population commensurate with the American population increase? Is it full of hostile wild animals or something? Is the weather really crazy? There must be a reason...
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Old10-29-2012, 06:25 PM
 

Location: Forests of Maine

33,157 posts, read 54,366,246 times

Reputation: 23637

Quote:

Originally Posted by RomaniGypsyView Post

... And why do so few people live there?

We prefer it this way.



Quote:

... Why has there been so little demand for homestead property in that area that it hasn't seen an appreciable increase in population commensurate with the American population increase?
No jobs.



Quote:

... Is it full of hostile wild animals or something?
Oh, yes, man-eating animals. squirrels with big teeth that can rip your head off clean at your shoulders. They are smart buggers, with big teeth. The chipmunks are bad too. Big teeth!





Quote:

... Is the weather really crazy? There must be a reason...
Thats it, we have four seasons. That keeps folks away.
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Northwest Aroostook, Maine

From Academic Kids

Northwest Aroostook is an unorganized territory located in Aroostook County, Maine. As of the 2000 census, the unorganized territory had a total population of 27.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the unorganized territory has a total area of 6,912.0 km² (2,668.7 mi²). 6,809.2 km² (2,629.0 mi²) of it is land and 102.8 km² (39.7 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 1.49% water.

Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there are 27 people, 12 households, and 5 families residing in the unorganized territory. The population density is 0.0/km² (0.0/mi²). There are 313 housing units at an average density of 0.0/km² (0.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the unorganized territory is 96.30% White, 3.70% Black or African American, 0.00% Native American, 0.00% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.00% from other races, and 0.00% from two or more races. 3.70% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 12 households out of which 16.7% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% are married couples living together, 0.0% have a female householder with no husband present, and 58.3% are non-families. 50.0% of all households are made up of individuals and 16.7% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 1.92 and the average family size is 3.00.

In the unorganized territory the population is spread out with 7.4% under the age of 18, 0.0% from 18 to 24, 40.7% from 25 to 44, 14.8% from 45 to 64, and 37.0% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 46 years. For every 100 females there are 200.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 212.5 males.

The median income for a household in the unorganized territory is $22,250, and the median income for a family is $21,750. Males have a median income of $13,750 versus $27,083 for females. The per capita income for the unorganized territory is $16,872. 0.0% of the population and 0.0% of families are below the poverty line.

Categories: Aroostook County, Maine | Unorganized territories in Maine

Sours: https://academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Northwest_Aroostook%2C_Maine
AROOSTOOK COUNTY: Maine's Northernmost County

Aroostook County, Maine

County in Maine, US

U.S. county in Maine

Aroostook County (French: Comté d'Aroostook) (ə-ROOS-tək) is a county in the U.S. state of Maine along the Canada–U.S. border. As of the 2010 census, the population was 71,870.[3] Its seat is Houlton[4] with offices in Caribou and Fort Kent.[5]

Known locally in Maine as "The County"[citation needed], it is the largest American county by land area east of the Mississippi River, excluding water (St. Louis County, Minnesota, is larger by total area, if water is included), even larger than three U.S. states. It is Maine's northernmost county. Its northernmost village, Estcourt Station, is also the northernmost community in New England and in the contiguous United States east of the Great Lakes.

Aroostook County is known for its potato crops, as well as its Acadian culture. In the Saint John Valley in the northern part of the county, which borders Madawaska County, New Brunswick, many of the residents are bilingual in English and Acadian French. Elsewhere in Maine, New England French is the predominant form of French spoken.

The county is also an emerging hub for wind power.

History[edit]

The sparsely populated Maine North Woods, roughly defined as the headwaters of the Saint John, Penobscot and Kennebec Rivers, was populated through the colonial era by refugees fleeing unfriendly governments. Native Americans retreating from hostile European colonists, and smugglers trading with these Native Americans and between English Massachusetts and French Acadia lived in small communities along the Atlantic coast on the disputed border between those colonies. As England dominated the Gulf of Maine following the French and Indian Wars, these occupants of the border region retreated up the large rivers into the interior joined by Acadians escaping the Acadian Expulsion. Although the survivors might have preferred to remain independent, surrounding governments dividing their refuge perceived Aroostook County as the west bank of the Saint John River drainage upstream of Canada. Under United States control, the area was initially dominated by lumber manufacturing interests, although agriculture became important as population increased. Transportation along the Saint John River and early rail connections into New Brunswick caused strong business links with Canada until the county was connected to the United States rail network by the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad in 1894. Aroostook County residents retain an independent cultural identity established during their history of isolation on the border frontier.[6]

Aroostook County was formed in 1839 from parts of Penobscot and Washington counties. In 1843, Aroostook gained land from Penobscot County; in 1844, Aroostook again gained land from Penobscot, plus it exchanged land with Piscataquis County. In 1889, Aroostook gained slightly from Penobscot, but gave back the land in 1903 when Aroostook County gained its final form.[7] Some of the territory in this county was part of the land dispute that led to the "Aroostook War" that would be settled by the Webster–Ashburton Treaty.

Children gathering potatoes on a large farm in Aroostook County, 1940. Schools did not open until the potatoes were harvested. Photo by Jack Delano.

The county was also part of a route on the Underground Railroad, and was one of the last stops before entering Canada. Slaves would meet and hide just outside Aroostook[8] or in deserted areas. Friends Quaker Church near Fort Fairfield was often a final stop.[9]

Much of Aroostook County's economy was dominated by military spending through the Cold War. Limestone Army Air Field was built in Limestone, Maine in 1947. It was renamed Loring Air Force Base (AFB) in 1953 as the home of the Strategic Air Command (SAC) 42d Bombardment Wing operating Convair B-36 Peacemaker bombers. Aroostook County was chosen due to its strategic location as the closest point in the Continental United States to the Middle East and Europe including the Soviet Union west of the Ural Mountains. Loring AFB could accommodate one hundred of these large bombers; and had both the largest fuel storage capacity, at 9,200,000 US gallons (35,000,000 L), and the largest weapons storage capacity, at 4700 tonnes NEW, of any SAC base. The 42d Bombardment Wing at Loring operated Boeing B-52 Stratofortress bombers[10] until the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended closure and the base closed in 1994.[11]

The 2014 Acadian World Congress was held along the Canada–United States border, co-hosted by Aroostook County and a number of neighboring counties in Canada (Témiscouata in Quebec, and Victoria, Madawaska and Restigouche in New Brunswick). Organizers planned a Tintamarre that was held in the town of Madawaska, Maine, as well as a giant tug of war across the Saint John River.[12]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 6,828 square miles (17,680 km2), of which 6,671 square miles (17,280 km2) is land and 156 square miles (400 km2) (2.3%) is water.[13] Aroostook County is Maine's largest county by area, about the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined. The county high point is Peaked Mountain, elevation 2230 feet, whose western slopes are in the north east corner of Piscataquis County.

Adjacent counties and municipalities[edit]

  • Washington County, Maine – southeast
  • Penobscot County, Maine – south
  • Piscataquis County, Maine – south
  • Somerset County, Maine – southwest
  • Montmagny Regional County Municipality, Quebec – west
  • L'Islet Regional County Municipality, Quebec – west
  • Kamouraska Regional County Municipality, Quebec – northwest
  • Témiscouata Regional County Municipality, Quebec – north
  • Madawaska County, New Brunswick – northeast
  • Victoria County, New Brunswick – east
  • Carleton County, New Brunswick – east
  • York County, New Brunswick – southeast

National protected area[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Government and politics[edit]

Although the county is more socially conservative than Maine's southern and coastal counties, it was won by the Democratic Presidential candidate in the six elections from 1992 – 2012[14] before going for the Republican candidate in 2016.[15] In the Maine Legislature, the county's delegation in 2013 included three Democrats and seven Republicans.[16] In 2009 it voted 73% in favor of a referendum rejecting same-sex marriage and 54% against the Maine Medical Marijuana Act.[17] In 2012, it voted 67% against a measure to legalizesame-sex marriage in Maine,[18] the highest opposition percentage of any county in the state. From 2016 to 2020, the margin increased from 55-38% to 59-39%, respectively. This makes Aroostook County the only county in New England to have a more major Republican shift.

Due to the remoteness from the rest of Maine and a perceived lack of connection with the Maine government, as well as a strong connection with neighboring Canada, politicians of Aroostook County, Maine, have proposed making Aroostook part of New Brunswick or spinning off the county as its own state, probably named Aroostook, since the 1990s. As recently as 2005 the question has been brought up before the state legislature.[19]

Voter registration[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential elections results

Year RepublicanDemocraticThird parties
202059.0%21,08039.0% 13,9562.0% 710
201655.3%19,41938.1% 13,3866.5% 2,292
201244.9% 15,19652.5%17,7772.6% 887
200844.2% 15,89853.8%19,3452.1% 751
200446.6% 17,56451.9%19,5691.6% 600
200047.1% 16,55548.9%17,1964.0% 1,392
199629.9% 10,40051.8%18,02218.3% 6,370
199232.2% 12,40940.6%15,68227.2% 10,494
198853.4%17,21346.1% 14,8500.6% 183
198463.6%21,83736.0% 12,3480.5% 153
198048.3%16,34342.8% 14,4928.9% 3,011
197648.5%15,55048.3% 15,4843.2% 1,017
197262.4%19,05137.6% 11,4740.1% 22
196847.6% 13,91951.5%15,0440.9% 273
196436.3% 9,99463.7%17,5520.0% 3
196055.8%18,69844.2% 14,7990.0% 0
195672.4%16,00127.6% 6,0890.0% 0
195268.9%16,85130.9% 7,5610.3% 64
194856.5%9,45942.9% 7,1830.6% 98
194459.2%11,67840.7% 8,0170.1% 22
194058.3%13,88841.5% 9,8770.2% 39
193664.7%14,70833.9% 7,7041.4% 324
193259.5%14,05439.8% 9,4090.7% 168
192871.5%14,54528.4% 5,7710.2% 41
192481.6%9,55412.9% 1,5105.5% 643
192088.5%11,19111.1% 1,4070.4% 50
191669.6%5,77029.2% 2,4251.2% 98
191211.5% 89824.6% 1,92463.9%4,991
190877.6%4,78318.8% 1,1573.7% 227

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18409,413
185012,52933.1%
186022,47979.4%
187029,60931.7%
188041,70040.8%
189049,58918.9%
190060,74422.5%
191074,66422.9%
192081,7289.5%
193087,8437.5%
194094,4367.5%
195096,0391.7%
1960106,06410.4%
197092,463−12.8%
198091,331−1.2%
199086,936−4.8%
200073,938−15.0%
201071,870−2.8%
202067,105−6.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[22]
1790–1960[23] 1900–1990[24]
1990–2000[25] 2010–2016[3]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[26] of 2000, there were 73,938 people, 30,356 households, and 20,429 families residing in the county. The population density was 11 people per square mile (4/km2). There were 38,719 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.80% White, 0.38% Black or African American, 1.36% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. 0.60% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.6% were of French, 15.4% United States or American, 14.6% English, 14.3% French Canadian and 10.2% Irish ancestry. As of 2010, 18.0% of the population reported speaking French at home; other than speakers of English, there were no other significant linguistic groups.[27]

There were 30,356 households, out of which 28.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.60% were married couples living together, 8.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.70% were non-families. 27.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.60% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 26.30% from 25 to 44, 26.20% from 45 to 64, and 17.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 95.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,837, and the median income for a family was $36,044. Males had a median income of $29,747 versus $20,300 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,033. About 9.80% of families and 14.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.20% of those under age 18 and 16.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 71,870 people, 30,961 households, and 19,578 families residing in the county.[28] The population density was 10.8 inhabitants per square mile (4.2/km2). There were 39,529 housing units at an average density of 5.9 per square mile (2.3/km2).[29] The racial makeup of the county was 95.7% white, 1.7% Native American, 0.6% black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.9% of the population.[28] In terms of ancestry, 27.2% were French, 18.1% were English, 17.4% were Irish, 8.2% were French Canadian, 8.1% were American, and 5.2% were German.[30]

Of the 30,961 households, 25.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 36.8% were non-families, and 30.8% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.79. The median age was 45.3 years.[28]

The median income for a household in the county was $36,574 and the median income for a family was $47,114. Males had a median income of $37,222 versus $28,244 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,251. About 10.6% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.4% of those under age 18 and 11.7% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Incorporated towns[edit]

Plantations[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities within towns[edit]

Unorganized territories[edit]

Indian reservations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Aroostook | county, Maine, United States".
  2. ^"Aroostook County Government". Aroostook.me.us. January 5, 2012. Archived from the original on May 22, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  3. ^ ab"State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  4. ^"Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  5. ^"Home". aroostook.me.us. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  6. ^Strout, W. Jerome (1966). 75 Years The Bangor and Aroostook. Bangor, Maine: Bangor and Aroostook Railroad. pp. 18–22.
  7. ^Adrian B. Ettlinger. AniMap Plus: County Boundary Historical Atlas. Gold Bug Software, Alamo, CA, 1997.
  8. ^"Fort Fairfield | Maine: An Encyclopedia". Maineanencyclopedia.com. Archived from the original on September 18, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  9. ^"Crown of Maine Productions". Crown of Maine Productions. Archived from the original on February 13, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  10. ^"SAC Bases: Loring Air Force Base". Strategic-Air-Command.com. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
  11. ^Earth Tech, Inc. (1994). "Loring Air Force Base"(PDF). Historic American Buildings Survey. Limestone, Maine: Historic American Engineering Record. Archived(PDF) from the original on June 9, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  12. ^Olmstead, Kathryn (April 10, 2014). "Van Buren, Canadian towns reach across border to get ready for World Acadian Congress in August". Bangor Daily News. Archived from the original on April 13, 2014. Retrieved April 11, 2014.
  13. ^"2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 9, 2014. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  14. ^"New York Times Election Map". Elections.nytimes.com. December 9, 2008. Archived from the original on April 8, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  15. ^"2016 Maine Presidential Election Results". Politico. Archived from the original on November 26, 2016. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  16. ^"Maine Senate site". Maine.gov. Archived from the original on May 14, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  17. ^Bangor Daily NewsArchived December 23, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  18. ^"2012 Election Results Map by State – Live Voting Updates". Politico.Com. February 6, 2013. Archived from the original on January 6, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  19. ^Bill calls for close look at secessionArchived November 11, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  20. ^Bureau of Corporations, Elections & Commissions (May 5, 2019). "Registered & Enrolled Voters - Statewide"(PDF). Department of the Secretary of State, State of Maine. p. 6. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  21. ^Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on March 23, 2018. Retrieved May 4, 2018.
  22. ^"U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  23. ^"Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  24. ^"Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 23, 2015. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  25. ^"Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000"(PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived(PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  26. ^"U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  27. ^"American Community Survey Aggregate Data, 5-Year Summary File, 2006–2010". Data Center. Aroostook County, Maine: Modern Language Association. 2006–2010. Archived from the original on August 15, 2013. Retrieved August 23, 2013.
  28. ^ abc"DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  29. ^"Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  30. ^"DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  31. ^"DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.

External links[edit]

Places adjacent to Aroostook County, Maine

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aroostook_County,_Maine

Maine northwest aroostook

Northwest Aroostook, Maine

Unorganized territory in Maine, United States

Northwest Aroostook is an unincorporated area in Aroostook County, Maine, United States. The population was 10 at the 2010 census.[1]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the unorganized territory has a total area of 2,669.2 square miles (6,913.2 km2), of which 2,629.4 square miles (6,810.1 km2) is land and 39.8 square miles (103.2 km2), or 1.49%, is water.[1] This territory is also larger than the size of Delaware.

There are 70 townships within the unorganized territory, plus part of one that is shared with Square Lake. The northernmost point of Maine, Big Twenty Township, is located in Northwest Aroostook.

Demographics[edit]

As of the 2000 census,[4] there were 27 people, 12 households, and 5 families living in the unorganized territory. The population density was 0.0 people per square mile (0.0/km2). There were 313 housing units at an average density of 0.1/sq mi (0.0/km2). The racial makeup was 96.30% White and 3.70% Black or African American. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.70% of the population.

There were 12 households, of which 16.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, and 58.3% were non-families. In the unorganized territory, 50.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.92, and the average family size was 3.00.

In the unorganized territory, 7.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 40.7% were 25 to 44, 14.8% were 45 to 64, and 37.0% were 65 or older. The median age was 46 years. For every female, there were 2.000 males. For every female age 18 and over, there were 2.125 males.

The median income for a household in the unorganized territory was $22,250, and the median income for a family was $21,750. Males had a median income of $13,750, versus $27,083 for females. The per capita income for the unorganized territory was $16,872. None of the population or the families was below the poverty line.

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Northwest Aroostook UT, Aroostook County, Maine". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 10, 2020. Retrieved May 22, 2013.
  2. ^"Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  3. ^"Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  4. ^"U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Aroostook,_Maine
Northern Maine Amish Country ~ A Trip To The Amish Store

I stood in the dense bushes of a deciduous tree about five meters from the car. The open door and the included plafond allowed me to see everything and hear a quiet conversation. Actually, there was nothing to listen to. The guy behind the wheel again poured vodka for everyone and threw the empty bottle right at my feet: -Girls, you are so nice that I just.

Have no words.

Similar news:

Suddenly, the creak of the opening door was heard from above. High. Don't stop.



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