Propane marine stove

Propane marine stove DEFAULT

Product features:

  • 100% Stainless Steel

  • 11,000 & Dual 7,000 BTU Burners

  • Thermostatically Controlled Oven, Complete with Broiler

  • Pot Holders

  • Removable Cutting Board

  • Gimbaled, or Built-In Installation Option Available

This stove/oven is the perfect unit for your boat.  It features 2 efficient 11,000 & 7,000 BTU burners, with safety "flame-out" protection.  Also features a 35 Liter thermostatically controlled oven, complete with broiler.

Handmade in Canada, using 100% stainless steel, backed by the Dickinson name.

Model

00-MED3B
Width 20.375"
Depth 20.250"
Height 21.750"
Oven Size Width - 18"
Depth - 12 Inches
Height - 7 Inches
Weight 80 lbs
Material Stainless
Fuel Propane (LPG)
OutputDual Small Burners 7,000 BTU
Large Burner 11,000 BTU
Oven - 7,000 BTU + Broiler
.



These warnings are not an indication that these products are violating any safety standards or regulations.

However, as our products might be sold in the state of California, we are legally obliged to inform customers about the potential presence of these chemicals in our products.

Sours: https://www.suremarineservice.com/Galley/Dickinson/00-MED3B.html

Imagine the scent of bacon, eggs and freshly-brewed coffee wafting through the boat in the morning.

When it comes to cooking onboard, most boaters are content to use a good old portable grill. But what do you crave more than hot dogs, burgers and the occasional BBQ chicken?

If you liveaboard or plan to be on your boat for an extended time, you’ll probably want to save a little money and calories by preparing some of your own meals. Dining out while traveling, especially by boat, is wonderful. But sometimes it’s nice just to stay put.

If your boat’s big enough for a galley (kitchen in boat talk), then you’ll wanna brush up on marine stove knowledge. Regardless of how big the galley is, you can find a marine stove to fit your needs for sautéing, baking or just boiling a pot of water.

On the market is a wide range (pun intended) of marine stoves available. Depending on your boat galley’s available space, you can find stoves with just a cooktop or with an oven. Whether you’re replacing a current stove or searching for one to add to your home on the water, scroll on down to discover safe and efficient marine stoves for your trawler, cabin cruiser, sailboat or canal boat.

What Makes a Marine Stove Different From a Regular Stove?

While marine stoves bake and fry the same way as regular stoves, they do have some features that make them unique:

  • Compact in size – One noticeable difference in marine stoves are their size. Boat galleys are not as spacious as the kitchen in your house, so the stove (as well as other appliances) needs to fit into tighter spaces.
  • Gimbaled – Since boats are nearly always moving, a marine stove must pivot to stay level. This is called gimbaled. The stove has two pivot points that allow it to swing, which keeps pots or pans from sliding off onto the floor. Typically, sailboats have gimbaled stoves. Powerboats usually do not have gimbaled stoves, as they tend to stay steadier than sailboats.
  • Pot restraints – Metal brackets or clamps go around the pot to hold it in place.
  • Securely latched doors – Doors are kept shut by secure restraints so they don’t just fall open on their own.
  • Stainless steel – Marine stoves are usually made from non-corrosive materials such as stainless steel, making them less susceptible to rust.

Considerations for Cooking on Board a Boat

marine stoves

Cooking on board, like other actions on a boat, require new approaches to everyday kitchen practices. First and foremost, keep those knives in a drawer.

  • Eliminate glass – This one doesn’t need an explanation. And don’t worry, you don’t need to stick with Solo cups and paper plates. A variety of brands make quality acrylic and non-shattering dishes and drinkware. Tervis (check prices on Amazon) is one of my favorites.
  • Purchase non-slip products – Non-slip is your new best friend. This goes for cutting boards, knives, dishes and anything imaginable.
  • Allow ventilation – Your boat galley’s confined space is going to produce extra heat. Open a window or leave the hatch open for a nice breeze.
  • Condense food and storage – Your boat galley’s limited space also means you’ll need to put on your creative thinking cap when it comes to food and accessory storage.

Types of Marine Stove Fuels

I was surprised to discover just how many marine stoves are available. The main differing factor being the type of fuel they use. Combustible fuel, as well as electricity, are two energy sources that provide power for marine stoves.

Alcohol

Alcohol marine stoves, which heat by way of pressurized tanks or non-pressurized burners, come in a wide variety. Alcohol marine stoves are a safe choice; if there’s a fire, it can be extinguished with water.

On the downside, alcohol lacks in providing a high level of heat, which puts it on the less efficient side. It’s also expensive and gives off an unpleasant odor.

Diesel

Diesel marine stoves are mainly used in commercial boats. Diesel burns very hot and is cheaper than alcohol.

However, on the negative side, it can leave soot when burning and puts off a terrible odor.

Electric

Without an open flame, electric stoves are the safest choice out there.

Unfortunately, they’re also the most expensive because they require a large amount of electricity from generators or marina shore power. But if your boat has an AC genset, you’re good to go with an electric marine stove.

Propane

Propane, also known as Liquid Petroleum Gas, has become the fuel of choice for many marine stoves. It has a high heat factor, lights quickly and has no offensive odor. The major safety factor with propane is that it can ignite and cause an explosion. However, safety features like a  propane fume detector (check price on Amazon) should be put in place to alleviate this worry.

The Best Marine Stoves

Preview

Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]
Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop
Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

Item

Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]

Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

Preview

Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]

Item

Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]

Preview

Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop

Item

Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop

Preview

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

Item

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

Let’s discuss the different brands and features of marine stoves. Depending on the galleys’ size, you can keep it simple or go full-on gourmet if you so choose.

Eno Stoves

marine-stoves

Eno Stoves are available in two-burner gimbaled cooktops, three-burner built-in propane cooktops, wall mount ovens and three-burner stoves. Features include pot holders, gas shutoffs and raised flame guards surrounding the top, which is also handy for keeping pots and pans where they belong.

Force 10

marine-stoves

Force 10 has made marine stoves for more than 30 years. They make gimballed, built-in and cooktop marine stoves. Two, three, four and five-burner versions are available in gas or electric models. Features include stainless steel construction, ceramic glass cooktops, thermocouple protection on burners, removable top grates and slide away oven doors.

Dometic Origo

Along with cooktops and stoves, Dometic Origo (check prices on Amazon) makes a variety of marine stove accessories such as pot holders, flame spreaders and stove gimbals. Pressure-free gourmet stoves feature spacious ovens, adjustable oven racks, roasting pans, gimbals and two burners. You can enjoy that Thanksgiving turkey or Christmas ham on the water. Two and one-burner stovetops are also available.

Seaward by Whale Marine

If you’re searching for a cooktop, Seaward offers great choices. They make three-burner and two-burner cooktops (check price on Amazon) with marine-grade steel housings and aluminum top burners. Thermocouple valves shut off if the burners are extinguished. The cooktop heats quickly and the smooth glass wipes clean.

Dickinson Marine Two-Burner Cooktop

This Dickinson Marine two-burner drop-in propane cooktop (check price on Amazon) offers a is quite an efficient stove with a powerful “Triple style” 11,000 and a 7,000 BTU burner. The cooktop is also a breeze to install and includes under-counter brackets.

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range

For a boat with not much galley space, this Avanti 20-inch wide freestanding gas range marine stove (check price on Amazon) is the perfect option. It might not be ideal for monohull sailboats that tend to sway, as it lacks gimbals (although you could install your own), but it could work for a trawler or more stable catamaran. It also offers automatic electronic ignition and a glass oven door with a light to check on meals.

What to Cook With Your Marine Stove

marine stoves

Preview

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard
Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters
The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats
Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

Item

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard

Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters

The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats

Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

Preview

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard

Item

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard

Preview

Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters

Item

Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters

Preview

The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats

Item

The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats

Preview

Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

Item

Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

They say every meal tastes better on a boat. And with all this talk of stoves, ovens and cooktops—I’m getting hungry.

Put that new marine stove to good use and collect a few cookbooks (all available on Amazon):

Hopefully, this post sheds some light on any marine stove questions or concerns you might have.

Happy baking, broiling or frying!


Sandy Allen is a freelance writer based in Richmond, Virginia. Her specialties range from hotels, islands and yacht charters to theme parks and family fun. She enjoys boating, snorkeling and jet-skiing along the waterways of Virginia, Florida and North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Follow her adventures at Somewhere in the Sand.

Sours: https://betterboat.com/boating/marine-stoves/
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How to Use Propane on a Boat

Prior to our first charter trip, I had no idea how to use propane on a boat — I hadn’t even used a propane a camp stove or gas grill!  And I had very little experience with a gas stove or oven; about all I remember is a few friends having them and seeing them when I helped in their kitchens, but never using one.

So you could say I had more than a few questions . . . and more as we bought our own boat and began cruising!

Cooking on a boat is different, with a much smaller workspace and often no convenient stores. Make the transition easier with my FREE online course, Cooking for Adventures.

Propane Basics

I’m not going to try to cover absolutely everything about how to use propane on a boat in this article (in particular, I’m not covering maintenance or troubleshooting), but basically hit on the important things to know if you’re not very familiar with it.

Explosive

Propane is a potentially explosive fuel.  Be careful around it!  While some charter companies require you to turn it off at the tank any time you’re not actually using it, most boaters only turn it off when they are going to be away from the boat for an extended period of time . . . say, more than a day.

Propane Smell

Propane actually has no odor, but one is added to it so that you can tell if there is a leak.  If you smell propane, turn the propane off at the tank immediately and turn off all electricity and be very careful not to generate static electricity sparks.  Propane is heavier than air and “flows” with gravity very similarly to water; it will collect at the lowest point it can reach — generally in the bilge.  On most boats, it is safest to use the manual bilge pump to rid it from the boat; do not use an electric pump because of the risk of a explosion from a spark.  Be very careful as you locate and repair the leak (specifics of that are way beyond the scope of this article).

Three Important Safety Items

Your propane system has numerous parts, from the tank to the stove. But I want to talk about three in particular and the role they play in your safety.

Propane Locker

If you store your propane in a locker, the locker must be vented directly overboard (not through a hose) from the lowest point in the locker.  Propane is heavier than air and any leaked from the tank will collect in the bottom.

solenoid control panel

Solenoid

A solenoid is a valve in the propane line from the tank to the stove.  It’s electrically operated and typically there is an on/off switch near the stove.  You turn it on when you’re ready to light a burner and off when you’re done using the stove (with many, a red light comes on when the solenoid comes on as a visual reminder that it’s on).  It’s a safety feature and designed to fail closed — which means that if there is no electricity coming from the batteries, it will not operate.  Should you lose all power on the boat, you will have to devise a way to bypass the solenoid in order to cook.

As a safety precaution, it’s recommended that when you are ready to turn the last burner off that you’re using to prepare a meal, you first turn the solenoid off and let the propane in the line go to the burner and burn.  When the flame goes out, then turn the burner off.  Unfortunately, this is often hard to remember in real life and I often found myself either just turning the burner off and later remembering to turn the solenoid off, or turning the solenoid off and forgetting the burner until later!

Thermocouple

Another safety device, this designed to ensure that propane does not flow to the burner if there is no flame there.  That is, if the flame accidentally goes out, propane won’t keep flowing (since it is invisible as a gas, it could collect along the floor or bilge and cause an explosion).  That’s great, but the question is then how do you get the propane to the burner so you can light it?  You have to turn the knob on and push it in — pushing the knob in causes the propane to flow regardless of whether there is a flame or not.  Generally, you have to hold it in for a few seconds after the burner is lit until the thermocoupler has a chance to warm up.  Check with your stove’s documentation for more details as every stove can be a little different.

Lighting a Propane Stove

Many marine stoves have some sort of automatic or push-button igniters, where you don’t need a match or other lighter.  Many use an AA or AAA battery somewhere in the system for the igniter, so if your igniter stops working check your documentation for this.  And always keep some kitchen matches and/or long-nosed lighters (like you’d use for lighting a grill; see Light My Fire for a substitute you can make in a pinch) on hand — those igniters are notorious for not working (mine never did, Jan’s doesn’t).

To light a burner with the starter, first turn the solenoid on.  Turn the knob for the burner to the “start” or “light” position (or to medium-high if there is no marked “start” or “light”) and push it in and hold it in.  Then press the starter — it may take several tries.  If it doesn’t light in three or four clicks, let the knob out and wait several minutes before trying again, in order to let the propane dissipate and reduce the risk of a mini-explosion (or worse) when it does light.  Continue to hold the knob in for a few seconds until the burner is nicely burning, then let the knob out.  If the flame goes out, repeat and hold the knob a little longer (with time, you’ll learn how long it takes with your stove and it’ll be second nature).  Now you can adjust the burner to the setting desired.

To light a burner with a “fire starter” (long-nosed butane lighter), again begin by turning the solenoid on.  Light the fire starter and hold the flame beside the burner element.  Turn the knob for the burner to the “start” or “light” position (or to medium-high if there is no marked “start” or “light”) and push it in and hold it in.  It may take a couple seconds until the propane is at the burner, but the burner should light.  Remove the fire starter but continue to hold the knob in for a few seconds until the burner is nicely burning, then let the knob out.  If the flame goes out, repeat and hold the knob a little longer (with time, you’ll learn how long it takes with your stove and it’ll be second nature).  Now you can adjust the burner to the setting desired.

NOTE:  If the directions that came with your stove state a different procedure, follow those instead.  These are sort of “generic.”

How Long Does a Tank of Propane Last? 

Well, that depends on the size, how much and what types of cooking you do and so on.  But what I can say is that with full-time living, a 20-pound tank (also called a 5-gallon tank in some places) will last me about 3 months.  I bake and do everything I would ashore — in some ways, probably more as I heat dishwasher on the stove and also boil water for coffee instead of using a coffeemaker. I hear this same number from other liveaboards, and even a friend who lives ashore and uses a 20-pound tank.

For boats, the two sizes of tanks most often used are 10-pound and 20-pound tanks.  Many full-time cruisers have two tanks, so they are never without.  A spare tank needs to be kept where any leak will not drain into the boat.

Refilling the Tank

Our first question was whether the propane tank had to be empty before it’s refilled or could we do it when it was convenient?  Nope, it doesn’t have to be totally empty . . . although you’ll probably won’t be charged any less.

Many marinas do a refill service, where you take the tank to the office or other designated place by a certain time on a certain day and someone takes them to the tank farm and returns them generally the same day (sometimes the next day).  Other times, you’ll have to go to the tank farm yourself.

In the US, more and more often tanks are exchanged in many places such as home improvement stores, groceries, pharmacies and big box stores. These are easy but note that they usually only have 15 pounds of propane in a 20-pound tank and thus last about 25% less time.

Many boats, particularly in saltwater, have aluminum tanks.  If this is the case, don’t use the “swap-a-tank” services you see at so many convenience stores, supermarkets, and so on — those tanks are steel!

Read Next:

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Filed Under: Food & CookingTagged With: Chartering, Cook Adv, Cooking on a Boat, Stay Safe in the Galley

Sours: https://theboatgalley.com/propane-101/
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