E39 clutch fan

E39 clutch fan DEFAULT

Thread: Testing for a bad Fan Clutch (Sachs and Behr)

Dorin (Doru) was kind enough to post up an excellent pdf on how to test for a bad fan clutch. He also pointed out there are two different test procedures for two different fan clutch manufacturers. The write-up below is for the Sachs fan clutch, and following that is Orkhan's (Orxan4ik) video for the Behr brand.
(Since I can't copy/paste the pdf, I've copied the text into this post. Unfortunately I don't know who the author is and can't give them props. I'll try to find out.)


Fan Clutch test

First, lets discuss what the fan clutch does and why it is there. The fan clutch is just what the name says, it is a mechanism that will clutch the fan on and off depending on the need for more or less cooling air to flow thru the radiator. It is a thermostatically controlled device that when operating normally will vary the fan speed independently of the engine speed. When cruising down the road at freeway speeds, with outside temperature less then desert conditions, the fan should be merely be idling along, turning just fast enough to add a little air flow when needed, in this way the fan noise and drag on the engine is greatly reduced. When reducing speed, the fan clutch will sense higher temperatures thru the radiator and "clutch up" thereby increasing the fan speed to help maintain constant engine temperature. It may in fact, cycle as the temperature of the air thru the radiator changes depending on airflow. If the fan clutch operation is normal, when first starting the car, the fan clutch should "clutch up" and an increase in noise and airflow should be obvious. After about 60-90 seconds, the fan will un-clutch and the noise and airflow will drop. The fan will continue to turn but at a much reduced speed. As the engine warms and the thermostat opens to regulate the temperature, the air thru the radiator gets hotter and the clutch will sense this, thereby increasing the speed of the fan to maintain a normal operating temperature.
First signs of trouble:
A normal temperature indication at freeway speeds and an increasing temperature as the vehicle slows is one of the first indications of trouble. Many other things may give this indication but if the temperature seems to be stable at speeds but climbs in traffic or while stopped, this is a good indication that the fan clutch isn’t working correctly. As the temperature continues to climb, the auxiliary electric fan should start but may not provide enough air to keep the engine from overheating.
Another sign of trouble is if the fan noise is high and never decreases after starting, and is there anytime the engine RPM is higher then idle, this means that the fan clutch is "frozen" and is not releasing. Although this will not result in immediately serious trouble, it will load the engine continually and gas MPG will be reduced. Load on the fan belt(s) will be higher and shorten the life of that component also.
Fan modifications:



It has been suggested that other models of BMW fans can be substituted to reduce the noise and load of the fan. This is

NOT recommended! If the fan clutch is working properly, there should be no need to replace with a lesser fan. The noise and load of the fan should only be there when it is "clutched up" and the fan speed needed to keep that big V-12 cool. BMW designed it this way and it is never a good idea to alter the cooling system and in particular where alloy engines would be effected.


Testing the fan clutch:


If you have reason to suspect that the fan clutch is defective, here is the recommended procedure to verify the condition of the fan clutch.



1. Start the car (cold) with the hood open and note if the fan is turning, increase the engine RPM and note if the fan turns faster and the noise increases, if it does, first good indication, if it

does not increase speed/noise, clutch is bad and needs to be replaced. (Remember, this must be tested after the car has been off for and extended period, over night etc.)


2. Leave engine running and note if the fan starts to slow down after 2-5 minutes, speed/noise should diminish and even raising the RPM, the fan should not make as much noise as when first starting, if it does slow, this is the second good indication. If speed/noise does not decrease, clutch may be "frozen" and should be replaced.


3. Leave the engine idle and watch the temperature indicator. When normal operating temperature has been reached, some increase in fan speed/noise should be noted, in particular when the RPM is increased. If temperature is fairly stable and the fan noise/speed increases or cycles, third good indication. If temperature indication continues to increase, with no increase in fan noise/speed, clutch is defective and should be replaced.


4. After the engine is at normal operating temperature or above, is the only time that the "rolled up newspaper" test that many people talk about should be performed! Take some newspaper and roll it up into a long narrow tube. Be carefull, keep hands and fingers away from the fan while performing this test! With the engine at full operating temperature and idling, take the rolled up paper and insert it on the back side of the fan and try to reach the hub of the fan avoiding the blades until close to the hub. Push the rolled paper at the fan increasing the friction to the hub area of the fan. If the fan can not be stopped easily this is the fourth good indication, if it can be stopped the clutch is defective and should be replaced. Again, this test can only be performed when the engine is at or above full operating temperature.


Testing can be performed in any order but just make sure the conditions during testing are those that are specified for that specific test.


Do not continue to operate the engine if the temperature continues to rise and certainly stop if the temperature approaches "redline".




- Orkhan's video of the test for the Behr fan clutch.
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46IREK0Mp_8&feature=player_embedded[/ame]


Sours: https://www.bimmerforums.com/forum/

BMW E39 540i M62 4.4L Engine Cooling Fan Clutches

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Sours: https://www.ecstuning.com/BMW-E39-540i-M62_4.4L/Engine/Cooling/Fan/Clutch/
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BMW E39 540i Fan & Fan Clutch Replacement

The problem: The fan on the BMW 540i is only indirectly connected to the motor, and the viscous coupling is a separate unit in the middle of the fan. The fan is plastic and fan failures have been known to pierce the hood.

Symptoms: “Whooshing” noise from engine that is engine rpm dependent.

Verification: There are some suggestions out there to stick paper in the fan to test the viscous coupling strength. Sounds risky. With the motor off, turn the fan by hand. Grinding in the bearing? Very stiff, as opposed to smooth and rotates a partial rotation after spinning by hand? Bad fan clutch.

Tools: 1.25” (or 32 mm) open end wrench, rubber mallet and “Special” (homemade) pulley grabber tool-thingy. Tool construction details below.

To remove the fan you need to unscrew it, clock-wise from the motor. The problem is that you can’t generate enough torque on the nut to loosen it before the pulley slips with only the belt holding from slipping. You need a metal plate that has a hole drilled in it that will clear the bolt head on the pulley and allow the plate to get wedged up against the shaft. Then you can use either a 1.25 inch or 32 mm open end wrench to undo the fan/fan clutch assembly.

Note: be careful unscrewing the fan, as the assembly is on the heavy side, the plastic is probably getting brittle with age and if you drop it, you’ll more than likely going to be sorry. I plan to replace the fan and clutch at once.

Here’s the idea:



Here’s a picture of the “special tool”. It’s a 1/8” Aluminum front panel from an old electronic instrument. Ignore all the holes but the labelled one. Note how well I managed to drill that clearance hole. It needs to be close enough to the edge to clear the fan nut, but not so close to the edge that it breaks in use. I assume metal supermarket, or home depot Aluminum sheet would also work.



Here’s the tool and wrench in place. With the tool on first, the wrench actually holds it in place.



Another view, from directly above. Note how the wrench is holding the “special tool” in place, there’s no slop at all. Hold the “special tool” and hit the wrench with the mallet.



With the assembly removed, the 3 Allen head bolts holding the viscous clutch to the plastic fan can be removed. This picture shows just how well a 1.25” wrench fits the “supposed” 32 mm metric nut.



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Sours: https://blog.fcpeuro.com/bmw-e39-540i-fan-fan-clutch-replacement
BMW Fan Clutch Removal E46 E39 E53 M54

E39 Fan & Shroud Procedure

The following information is provided for reference purposes only and should be used at your own risk
In no event shall Beisan Systems, LLC or its members be liable for incidental, consequential, or special loss or damages of any kind however caused.


Fan & shroud removal

From under car

Raise front of car and place on jack stands (follow appropriate procedure; chock both sides of both rear wheels).
Note: Work under car can be performed without raising car, but will be under tight space.


Remove large engine compartment shield underneath front of car (Philips).


Disconnect coolant hoses from fan shroud bottom. Note hose mount sequence for reinstallation.


Disconnect auxiliary water pump electrical connector at bottom corner.
Disconnect coolant hoses from fan shroud side.


Slide pump out of fan shroud sleeve. Keep horizontal hose in shroud clip to allow pump to slide strait out. Once pump is out of shroud sleeve disconnect hose from shroud clip.
Note: Some coolant will leak from coolant hose connectors when manipulating them.

Lower car from jack stands (follow appropriate procedure).

From top of car

Open front hood.


Remove AUC (smell) sensor from fan shroud right side.
Press in on electrical connector side clip and pull up electrical connector. Move electrical cable/connector to side.
Push up on AUC bottom and pull top away from shroud. Push down on AUC top and pull bottom away from shroud. Remove AUC sensor from engine bay.


Remove rivet at each top corner of fan shroud. Pry out rivet center pin (tack lifter), then fully pry out rivet from base (tack lifter).


Remove retaining plastic clip at expansion tank bleed crew. Press in at both wings and lift up (2 flatheads).
Note: Unscrew/re-screw expansion tank cap as needed to remove clip.


Remove rubber seal between fan shroud top and car frame (hand).
Note seal orientation for reinstallation.


Lift fan shroud up and to rear.
Unscrew overflow hose clamp at radiator right top (Philips).
Pry hose off radiator overflow neck (flathead).
Remove hose clamp from hose to keep from loosing.

Note: If overflow hose clamp original, pry open clamp to remove (small flathead) and replaced with adjustable hose clamp.

Place fan shroud back into install position to facilitate space for fan removal.
Lift fan shroud up, pull forward, and drop down to mount into lower frame slots.


Belt static friction method:
Remove fan / fan clutch from water pump shaft.
Place open wrench on fan clutch nut (32mm combo wrench). Place wrench forward on nut to avoid hitting vanos body and thermostat hose connector. Strongly strike wrench side at top with heavy hammer to break nut seize (sledge hammer); left hand thread.
Note: Nut is left hand thread, thus unscrew by hitting wrench top from left to right (car front orientation). Serpentine belt static friction on water pump pulley facilitates large enough opposing force to break nut seize. It is important to use a heavy hammer to produce a high instantaneous jerk. Several attempts will be needed before nut seize breaks. Rotate open wrench to reposition for better access.

If belt static friction method is not successful, attempt pulley holding tool method.


Pulley holding tool method:
Remove fan / fan clutch from water pump shaft.
Position water pump pulley for holding tool access. Water pump pulley has 2 (adjacent) pairs of mounting bolts. Position one of the bolt pairs with left bolt at just to right of top center (picture) (32mm combo wrench).
Install water pump pulley holding tool onto pulley bolts. Position holding tool at right, and place tool indent curve against fan clutch nut. Mount tool end hole onto pulley bottom left bolt, and tool second hole onto pulley right bolt. Reposition fan clutch nut for better holding tool access (picture).
Place open wrench on fan clutch nut (32mm combo wrench). Counter hold holding tool and break clutch nut seize (32mm combo wrench); left hand thread.
Note: Nut is left hand thread, thus unscrew by turning wrench from left to right (car front orientation).

If fun clutch nut seize difficult to break, apply lubricant to nut/threads contact surfaces (spray lubricant).

Once nut seize is broken, remove tools and spin fan blades to unscrew nut; left hand thread.
When nut is close to shaft end, turn fan slowly while continuously holding fan blades. This will keep fan from falling and damaging radiator fins when fully disconnected.


Lift fan shroud up while maneuvering fan / fan clutch out of fan shroud and engine bay.


Remove fan shroud from engine bay.
Remove expansion tank bleed screw, dislodge expansion tank from fan shroud, then reinstall bleed screw (Philips).
Pull up on fan shroud while removing expansion tank and hoses from shroud. Tilt fan shroud right side up to help removal. Pull out overflow hose from shroud access slot. Remove shroud from engine bay. Place expansion tank at high location in engine bay. Place overflow hose high to keep coolant from draining out.
Note: Coolant will leak out from radiator overflow hose. Keep expansion tank height low to minimize leakage.

Fan & shroud installation

From top of car


Install fan shroud.
Position expansion tank at engine bay left side to mate with fan shroud.
Tilt shroud right side up and slide shroud into position while attaching expansion tank to shroud.
Insert expansion tank overflow hose into shroud access slot and lay on top of radiator.
Remove expansion tank bleed screw (Philips), fully install expansion tank onto shroud, and reinstall bleed screw (Philips).
Align shroud by pulling up, forward, and dropping into position.


Insert fan/clutch in fan shroud. Lift fan shroud up and forward while maneuvering fan/clutch into fan shroud.
Note: Fan is oriented with clutch nut to car rear.
Align shroud by pulling up, forward, and dropping down into lower frame slots.


Mount fan/clutch onto water pump shaft.
Lift fan and mate (hang) fan clutch nut onto water pump shaft. Rotate fan to find best nut thread to shaft thread mate. At optimal fit, fan will hang on shaft without threading (picture).
With fan hanging independently on shaft, slowly turn fan blades to thread nut onto shaft; left hand thread. Fully thread nut onto shaft.


Place open wrench on fan clutch nut (32mm combo wrench) and lightly hit wrench top with heavy hammer, one time; left hand thread (sledge hammer).
Note: Serpentine belt static friction on water pump pulley facilitates large enough opposing force to tighten clutch nut. Fan opposing spin also tightens fan clutch nut.


Lift fan shroud up and to rear. Insert overflow hose clamp onto overflow hose with clamp bolt head at bottom and facing forward (picture). Mount overflow hose onto radiator overflow neck. Position hose clamp onto radiator overflow neck and tighten clamp (Philips). Note: Position clamp bolt at bottom of radiator neck to allow for proper fan shroud fitment.


Fully install fan shroud. Lift fan shroud up, pull forward, and drop down to mount into lower frame slots.
Note: Fan shroud should insert fully and align with car frame.


Install rubber seal between fan shroud top and car frame.


Install retaining plastic clip at expansion tank bleed screw. Push down clip until it snaps in.
Unscrew and re-screw expansion tank cap as needed to facilitate access.


Install rivet at each top corner of fan shroud. Pry rivet center pin out, fully insert rivet base into shroud, then press in rivet center pin.


Install AUC (smell) sensor onto right side of fan shroud. Place sensor at mount position on shroud. Push down from sensor top and insert bottom clip, then push up from sensor bottom and insert top clip.
Install AUC electrical connector.

From under car

Raise front of car and place on jack stands (follow appropriate procedure; chock both sides of both rear wheels).
Note: Work under car can be performed without raising car, but will be under tight space.


Insert auxiliary water pump into fan shroud sleeve at bottom left side. Insert horizontal hose in shroud clip to allow pump to slide strait in.


Install auxiliary water pump electrical connector.
Install coolant hoses on fan shroud at left side.


Install coolant hoses on fan shroud at bottom side.


Install large engine compartment shield underneath front of car (Philips).

Lower car from jack stands (follow appropriate procedure).


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Sours: http://www.beisansystems.com/procedures/e39_fan_procedure.htm

Clutch fan e39

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How to Test the Fan Clutch for any BMW with a Newspaper

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