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Question:Q:macromedia folder/plist file

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Question:Q:

Hello.

I have deleted the macromedia folder in user/library/preferences and the safari plist file , in order to clean and lighten safari .

I don't know if I did right and I would like some opinions on this matter please.

I can always recover the old macromedia folder with Time Machine but I don't believe there is a reason to do so.

Safari is rebuilding those folders with new content.

I would like to delete the Local Storage folder in the user/library/preferences folder , and let safari recreate it but I didn't considered it necessary.

Still I am thinking of doing it.

Any considerations ?

Thank You

2.16 intel core 2 duo imac5.1, Mac OS X (10.6.7), 2,5GBmemory

Posted on May 15, 2011 12:35 AM

Answer:A:
Answer:A:
You know that with the reset option from the safari menu there is no way to clean old and unused records of the user/library/preferences/macromedia/flash player folder .

Now I see what you meant by Macromedia... Macromedia was bought out by Adobe.

You can delete Flash cookies. http://machacks.tv/2009/01/27/flushapp-flash-cookie-removal-tool-for-os-x/

Yes, you can delete the contents of the Local Storage folder.

For Safari maintenance, just emptying the cache daily can help.

Posted on May 15, 2011 3:22 AM

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May 15, 2011 2:59 AM in response to hydrofal78 In response to hydrofal78

I'm not sure why deleting the Macromedia folder would help with Safari...

If you delete a .plist file, the Mac OS X will regenerate a new one for you the next time you launch the app.

If you have specific issues with Safari, better to tell us what's wrong so we can try and help you troubleshoot.

We need details... is it crashing? freezing??

May 15, 2011 2:59 AM

May 15, 2011 3:12 AM in response to Carolyn Samit In response to Carolyn Samit

Nothing serious.I found out that there were many folders from previous sites that i don't use and I wanted to clean them . It is not crashing or freezing , just needed to do some prevention and maintain the archives of flash player.

I guess there was no reason to do it.

You know that with the reset option from the safari menu there is no way to clean old and unused records of the user/library/preferences/macromedia/flash player folder .

What about the user/library/safari/local storage folder ? Do you think I could delete its content or shall I let it as it is? Would it contribute to a safari maintenance ?

May 15, 2011 3:12 AM

May 15, 2011 3:22 AM in response to hydrofal78 In response to hydrofal78

You know that with the reset option from the safari menu there is no way to clean old and unused records of the user/library/preferences/macromedia/flash player folder .

Now I see what you meant by Macromedia... Macromedia was bought out by Adobe.

You can delete Flash cookies. http://machacks.tv/2009/01/27/flushapp-flash-cookie-removal-tool-for-os-x/

Yes, you can delete the contents of the Local Storage folder.

For Safari maintenance, just emptying the cache daily can help.

May 15, 2011 3:22 AM

May 15, 2011 3:29 AM in response to Carolyn Samit In response to Carolyn Samit

thank you Carolyn I appreciate your help .

They've given their app a correct & funny name : Flush.app.

Now I see the big picture . Each time I go to a site and there is a flash component it leaves a cookie that is stored in those folders.

bye

May 15, 2011 3:29 AM

May 15, 2011 3:30 AM in response to hydrofal78 In response to hydrofal78

Each time I go to a site and there is a flash component it leaves a cookie that is stored in those folders.

Correct and thanks for awarding points!

May 15, 2011 3:30 AM

User profile for user: hydrofal78 hydrofal78

Question:Q:macromedia folder/plist file

Sours: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3058492

How to Uninstall Flash Player

Software & Apps

Posted on January 7th, 2021 by Kirk McElhearn

Adobe Flash Player has had a long life as a tool for displaying multimedia content in web browsers, but as of December 31, 2020, this software reached the end of its life. From this date on, Adobe will not issue any updates for the software, and will prompt users to uninstall Flash Player as soon as possible.

Here’s how to uninstall Flash Player on your Mac.

Why uninstall Flash Player?

Adobe Flash Player has long been problematic because of the many security vulnerabilities discovered in the software. Because of this, users were accustomed to downloading new versions regularly. You could go to websites to view multimedia content, and see a message saying that your Flash Player software needed to be updated to be able to play a site’s content. Malware creators exploited this, serving Trojan horses that looked like Flash Player updates, but really just infected Macs.

Starting January 12, 2021, Adobe will block Flash content from running in Flash Player, but the software will remain on your Mac unless you uninstall it. It’s a good idea to remove any software that you don’t need, especially one with a potential to be exploited for malicious purposes.

How to uninstall Flash Player

Uninstalling Flash Player in simple. Adobe has a webpage offering Flash Player uninstaller for Mac. One version is for Macs running macOS / Mac OS X 10.6 or later, another is for Macs running Mac OS X 10.4 or 10.5, and there is even an uninstaller for Macs running Mac OS X 10.1 to 10.3.

Download the appropriate uninstaller, double-click the disk image, then double-click the Adobe Flash Player Uninstaller icon.

In the Uninstaller window, click Uninstall.

You’ll be asked to enter your password for this software to continue. If you have a browser running, the uninstaller will ask you to quit it. You can click Force Close All if you have multiple browsers open. (Don’t click the Quit button on the uninstaller; that quits the app itself.)

The uninstaller will remove the software, then display this screen confirming its uninstallation.

After the software is removed, there may be some files still on your Mac, and you can remove these manually. Go to the Library folder in your home folder (the one with the house icon and your name). If you don’t see the Library folder, in the Finder, hold down the Option key, then click the Go menu and choose Library. Look for the following folders, and delete them.

/Library/Preferences/Macromedia/Flash Player
/Library/Caches/Adobe/Flash Player

From now on, if you visit a website with Flash content, you will not be able to view this content. While Flash content has become rare, there are still some old sites that have not updated such content.

About Kirk McElhearn

Kirk McElhearn writes about Apple products and more on his blog Kirkville. He is co-host of the Intego Mac Podcast, as well as several other podcasts, and is a regular contributor to The Mac Security Blog, TidBITS, and several other websites and publications. Kirk has written more than two dozen books, including Take Control books about Apple's media apps, Scrivener, and LaunchBar. Follow him on Twitter at @mcelhearn. View all posts by Kirk McElhearn → This entry was posted in Software & Apps and tagged Adobe Flash Player. Bookmark the permalink.
Sours: https://www.intego.com/mac-security-blog/how-to-uninstall-flash-player/
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What is Macromedia Flash 5?

Macromedia Flash is an animation/development program where you can create animations or even simple games. Many websites and cartoons live off of or got their start on flash, such as Homestar Runner and Newgrounds.


Download Macromedia Flash 5 for Mac

mm-flash-5.sit.bin(18.47 MiB / 19.36 MB)
Mac OS 8 - 8.1 - Mac OS X / Binary encoded, use Stuffit Expander
812 / 2014-04-14 / 56c97d03c86a92dbd517aea8ce7d5ad1e46f7ad5 / /


Compatibility notes


Emulating this? It should run fine under: SheepShaver

Sours: https://www.macintoshrepository.org/177-macromedia-flash-5
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Flash Player Help

Settings Manager

This information applies to Adobe Flash Player on desktop and notebook computers. To change Flash Player settings on mobile devices, visit the Settings Manager for mobile devices.

Who uses this Settings Manager?

Beginning with Flash Player 10.3, the Local Settings Manager supersedes this Online Settings Manager for managing global settings on Windows, Mac, and Linux computers. The Local Settings Manager can be accessed in the Control Panel on Windows and in System Preferences on Mac. Users of other operating systems and earlier versions of Flash Player can continue to use the Online Settings Manager described here.

To access the local Flash Player Settings Manager that is native to your operating system:

  • Windows: click Start > Settings > Control Panel > Flash Player
  • Macintosh: System Preferences (under Other) click Flash Player
  • Linux Gnome: System > Preferences > Adobe Flash Player
  • Linux KDE: System Settings > Adobe Flash Player

To access Help for the local Settings Manager, click any of the individual Learn more…. links on the Settings Manager tabs, or click any of these links:


What can I do with the Settings Manager?

Adobe is committed to providing you with options to control SWF or FLV content and applications that run in Adobe Flash Player. The Flash Player Settings Manager lets you manage global privacy settings, storage settings, and security settings, by using the following panels:

  • To specify whether websites must ask your permission before using your camera or microphone, you use the Global Privacy Settings panel.
  • To specify the amount of disk space that websites you haven't yet visited can use to store information on your computer, or to prevent websites you haven't yet visited from storing information on your computer, you use the Global Storage Settings panel.
  • To view or change your security settings, you use the Global Security Settings panel.
  • To specify if and how often Flash Player should check for updated versions, you use the Global Notifications Settings panel.
  • To view or change the privacy settings for websites you have already visited, you use the Website Privacy Settings panel.
  • To view or change the storage settings for websites you have already visited, or to delete information that any or all websites have already stored on your computer, you use the Website Storage Settings panel.
  • To view or change protected media settings, you use the Protected Content Playback Settings panel.
  • To view or change peer-assisted networking settings, you use the Peer-Assisted Networking panel.

How do I get to the Settings Manager?

The Settings Manager is a special control panel that runs on your local computer but is displayed within and accessed from the Adobe website. Adobe does not have access to the settings that you see in the Settings Manager or to personal information on your computer.

Click the links below to open the specific Settings Manager panel that you want. The Settings Manager that you see on the page is not an image; it is the actual Settings Manager. To change your settings, click the tabs to see different panels, and then click the options in the Settings Manager panels that you see on the web page.

The settings in the Settings Manager apply to all websites that contain SWF or FLV content, rather than just a specific website.

What are privacy settings?

Applications that run in Flash Player may want to have access to the camera and/or microphone available on your computer. Privacy settings let you specify whether you want applications from a particular website to have such access. Note that it is the person or company that has created the application you are using that is requesting such access, not Adobe (unless Adobe has created the application that wants access to your camera or microphone).

It is the responsibility of the person or company requesting access to make it clear to you why they want access and how they plan to use the audio or video. You should be aware of the privacy policy of anyone who is requesting audio or video access. For example, see the Adobe privacy policy. Contact the website requesting access for information on their privacy policy.

It's important to understand that even though this settings panel is part of Flash Player, the audio and video will be used by an application created by a third party. Adobe assumes no responsibility for third-party privacy policies, actions of third-party companies in capturing audio or video on your computer, or such companies' use of such data or information.

To specify privacy settings for all websites, use the Global Privacy Settings panel. To specify privacy settings for individual websites, use the Website Privacy Settings panel.

What are storage settings?

Applications that run in Flash Player may want to store some information on your computer, but the amount they can store is limited to 100 kilobytes unless you agree to allocate additional space. Local storage settings let you specify how much disk space, if any, applications from a particular website can use to store information on your computer. Note that it is the person or company that has created the application you are using that is requesting such access, not Adobe (unless Adobe has created the application that wants to save the information). It is the responsibility of the person or company requesting access to make it clear to you why they want access and how they plan to use the information they save. You should be aware of the privacy policy of anyone who is requesting access to your computer. For example, see the Adobe privacy policy. Contact the website requesting access for information on their privacy policy.

It's important to understand that even though this settings panel is part of Flash Player, the information will be used by an application created by a third party. Adobe assumes no responsibility for third-party privacy policies, actions of third-party companies in storing information on your computer, or such companies' use of such data or information.

To specify storage settings for websites you haven't yet visited, use the Global Storage Settings panel. To specify storage settings for websites you have already visited, use the Website Storage Settings panel.

What are security settings?

Adobe has designed Flash Player to provide security settings that do not require you to explicitly allow or deny access in most situations. Over time, as SWF and FLV content have become more sophisticated, Flash Player has also become more sophisticated, offering users additional privacy and security protections. However, you might occasionally encounter older SWF or FLV content that was created using older security rules. In these cases, Flash Player asks you to make a decision: You can allow the content to work as its creator intended, using the older security rules, or you can choose to enforce the newer, stricter rules. The latter choice helps ensure that you only view or play content that meets the most recent standards of security, but it may sometimes prevent older SWF or FLV content from working properly.

When older content runs in a newer version of the player, and Flash Player needs you to make a decision about enforcing newer rules or not, you may see one of the following pop-up dialog boxes. These dialog boxes ask your permission before allowing the older SWF or FLV content to communicate with other locations on the Internet:

  • A dialog box might appear alerting you that the SWF or FLV content you are using is trying to use older security rules to access information from a site outside its own domain and that information might be shared between two sites. Flash Player asks if you want to allow or deny such access.

    In addition to responding to the dialog box, you can use the Global Security Settings panel to specify if Flash Player should always ask for your permission, through the dialog box, before allowing access; always deny access, without asking first; or always allow access to other sites or domains without asking your permission.
  • (Flash Player 8 and later) If you have downloaded SWF or FLV content to your computer, a dialog box might appear alerting you that the content is trying to communicate with the Internet. Flash Player 8 and later versions do not allow the local SWF or FLV content to communicate with the Internet, by default.

    Using the Global Security Settings panel, you can specify that certain applications that run in Flash Player on your computer may communicate with the Internet.

To change your security settings or learn more about your options, see the Global Security Settings panel.

What are protected content playback settings?

Some content on the Internet is protected by the content provider using Adobe Flash Access. To enjoy this protected content, users must first get content licenses from the content provider. These content licenses are automatically downloaded to your computer, for example, when you rent or purchase the protected content. Flash Player saves these licenses on your computer.

To manage or deactivate these licenses, use the Protected Content Playback Settings panel.

What are peer-assisted networking settings?

A website that serves audio and video to your computer can deliver the content with better performance if users who are playing the same content share their bandwidth. Sharing bandwidth allows the audio or video to play more smoothly, without skips or pauses from buffering. This is called peer-assisted networking, since peers on the network assist each other to provide a better experience. Flash Player only shares bandwidth using peer-assisted networking with your permission.

If you enable this option, you are not agreeing to share your bandwidth whenever an application wants to use it. You are only allowing applications to ask you whether you want to share your bandwidth. In most cases, you want to share your bandwidth only when you are using a high-speed Internet connection.

Note that sharing your bandwidth increases the amount of data your network provider delivers to your device. If you pay a flat monthly fee for unlimited network data, using peer-assisted networking won't increase your monthly bill.

However, if you pay for a limited amount of data or are unsure how you are charged for network usage, you probably want to disable peer-assisted networking. If you do so, you will never be asked whether you want to share your bandwidth.

To specify whether or not to use peer-assisted networking, use the Peer-Assisted Networking panel.

If I've already set privacy and disk space options in my browser, do I need to do it again?

You may be aware that some websites work together with your browser to store small amounts of data, called cookies, on your computer for their own use in the future. For example, when you go to a website regularly, it may welcome you by name; your name is probably stored in a cookie, and you can use browser options to determine whether you want cookies or not. You may also have specified in your browser that pages you visit can take up only a certain amount of disk space.

When SWF or FLV content is being played, the settings you select for Flash Player are used in place of options you may have set in your browser. That is, even if you have specified in your browser settings that you do not want cookies placed on your computer, you may be asked if an application that runs in Flash Player can store information. This happens because the information stored by Flash Player is not the same as a cookie; it is used only by the application and has no relation to any other Internet privacy or security settings you may have set in your browser.

Similarly, the amount of disk space you let the application use has no relation to the amount of disk space you have allotted for stored pages in your browser. That is, when SWF or FLV content is being played, the amount of disk space you allow here is in addition to any space your browser is using for stored pages.

No matter how you may have configured your browser, you still have the option to allow or deny the application that runs in Flash Player permission to store the information and to specify how much disk space the stored information can occupy.


Sours: https://www.macromedia.com/support/documentation/en/flashplayer/help/settings_manager.html

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