2020 yamaha zuma 125 review

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125

For those who primarily take the side streets to work with the occasional unpaved road—yes, unpaved road—the 2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 is a sporty scooter that is touted to have “rugged styling” appropriate for such purposes. Its steel frame, cast aluminum wheels shod with block-pattern tires, 3.1-inch rear suspension travel, front fender, off-road-style brush deflectors, and fork boots are indicators of its light unpaved road capabilities while its electric starter, automatic transmission, 7.7 gallons of storage, and step-through design make it a convenient commuter. It is powered by a 125cc four-stroke engine to get its claimed 103 mpg from a 1.7-gallon fuel tank.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 Reviews, Comparisons, And Competition

Yamaha Zuma 125 Updates For 2020

Since 2018, the Zuma 125 MSRP has increased $100 and is now $3,499. The Zuma is available in Matte Black or Ultramarine Blue.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 Claimed Specifications

Price$3,499
EngineAir-cooled SOHC single-cylinder
Displacement125cc
Bore x Stroke52.4 x 57.9mm
HorsepowerN/A
TorqueN/A
TransmissionAutomatic
Final DriveBelt
Seat Height30.7 in.
Rake27.0°
Trail3.7 in.
Front Suspension33mm telescopic fork
Rear SuspensionDual shocks; 3.1-in. travel
Front Tire120/70-12
Rear Tire130/70-12
Wheelbase51.4 in.
Fuel Capacity1.7 gal.
Claimed Wet Weight262 lb.
Sours: https://www.cycleworld.com/story/buyers-guide/2020-yamaha-zuma-125/

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 [Model Overview]

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 / BW’s 125

The 2020 Yamaha Zuma 125, or as it is known in Europe and Canada, the BW’s 125, is one of those scooters that you can’t help but grin about. A tiny little thing, it still has plenty of punch from its 125cc, fuel-injected, air-cooled single, producing just about 8 crank HP and 7 lbs-ft of crank torque. Being small and agile, the Zuma 125 is perfect for city streets, and is light enough that it is quite tossable, leading to what could only be described as “fun.”

Thanks to ample underseat storage, electronic start, great brakes for the size of the scooter, and a steel frame that can take quite a beating, the Zuma 125 has become a well-loved city runabout the world over.

The 2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 starts at $3,499 US, and the 2020 Yamaha BW’s 125 starts at $3,699 CA

On this page:we’ve curated specs, features, news, photos/videos, etc. so you can read up on the new Yamaha Zuma 125 in one place.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125


Model Overview

General Info

  • Price: $3,499 US / $3,699 CA
  • Key Features:
    • High Quality Braking
    • Aggressive Headlights and Styling
    • Potent Fuel Injected Engine

Key Specs

  • Engine type: 125cc forced air-cooled
  • Power: 8 Hp
  • Wet weight: 262 lb
  • Seat height: 30.7 in

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125


2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 Specifications

From Yamaha

ENGINE

Engine292cc liquid-cooled 4-stroke, SOHC single-cylinder; 4 valves
Power8 Hp
Bore x Stroke52.4mm x 57.9mm
Compression Ratio10.0:1
Fuel SystemFuel Injection
StarterElectric
Lubrication

DRIVETRAIN

Clutch
TransmissionAutomatic
Final DriveV-Belt

CHASSIS

Suspension FrontTelescopic forks
Suspension RearDual shocks
Brakes FrontHydraulic disc, 245mm
Brakes RearHydraulic disc, 200mm
Tires Front120/70-12
Tires Rear130/70-12
Fuel Tank Capacity6.4 L (1.7 US gal.)
ColorMatte Black, Ultramarine Blue

ELECTRICAL

IgnitionDigital TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Spark Plugs
HeadlightLED
Tail LightLED

DIMENSIONS

Overall Length
Overall Width
Overall Height
Wheelbase51.4 in (1305 mm)
Ground Clearance4.9 in (125 mm)
Seat Height30.7 in (780 mm)
Curb Weight262 lbs (118 kg)

WARRANTY

Warranty1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)
Extension

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125


2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 Features

  • Rugged, Modern Design
    Beneath the sleek styling, the Zuma 125 is built around a strong steel frame with fat, aggressive tires on cast aluminum wheels, tough suspension, and protective off-road-style brush deflectors and fork tube boots. This scooter boasts capability on roads of all sorts, with plenty of attitude for your daily commute.
  • Potent Fuel Injected Engine
    Powering the Zuma 125 is a compact 125cc 4-stroke engine with 4 valves, a 10:1 compression ratio, ceramic-composite cylinder liner, and electronic fuel injection—giving this scooter modern reliability and economical performance. With an amazing 103 mpg* and a 1.7- gallon fuel tank, you get plenty of range, too.
  • Automatic Convenience
    A fully-automatic V-belt transmission and push-button electric starting make the Zuma 125 super-convenient transportation. Standard center and side stands, along with a locking cover on the ignition switch, make it easy and secure to park, too.
  • Roomy, Step-Through Ergonomics
    There’s room for two atop the Zuma 125’s seat and lots of locking storage beneath it. The step-through floorboards making getting on and off a breeze, too.
  • Potent Fuel Injected Engine
    Zuma 125’s fuel-injected, 125cc single-cylinder, 4-stroke engine pumps out lots of power for its size, using an SOHC 4-valve head with a 10:1 compression ratio and ceramic-composite cylinder plating. Fuel injection provides the optimal fuel mixture for varying conditions, and that means easy cold starts, too.
  • Electric Starter
    Pushbutton electric starting makes the Zuma 125 super-convenient for transportation.
  • Modern Reliability
    For reliability and easy maintenance, simple wet-sump lubrication is used. Forced air cooling system helps keep engine temperatures under control, even while idling at stoplights, for maximum efficiency and longer engine life.
  • Automatic Convenience
    Fully automatic, V-belt transmission with centrifugal clutch provides easy, twist-the-throttle-and-go operation with great off-the-line acceleration.
  • Ready to Get Dirty
    Oiled-paper type air filter helps trap dirt before it gets to your engine, even when riding on unpaved roads. The V-belt housing has its own off-road-style wet-foam air filter for durability.
  • Clean-Running Design
    Upswept muffler incorporates exhaust catalyst technology to reduce air pollution and meet emission regulations.
  • Hardy Steel Frame
    Robust steel-tube frame is light but strong and features a step-through design for easy mounting. A two-stage electrostatic painting process provides a durable, corrosion-resistant finish.
  • Durable Suspension
    Telescopic fork features beefy outer tubes for strength, while fork boots help protect the large 33mm inner tubes from debris. The swingarm features twin rear shocks with a full 3.1 in of travel for riding comfort on the street and unpaved roads, too.
  • Generous Fuel Range
    Fuel tank holds 1.7 gallons for plenty of cruising range. Fuel tank emissions system includes a charcoal canister to control gasoline evaporation and reduce air pollution.
  • Heavy-Duty Tires and Wheels
    Fat 120/70-12 front and 130/70-12 rear tires have an aggressive looking block pattern for great handling on unpaved roads and on the street. Tires run on lightweight five-spoke die-cast aluminum wheels.
  • High Quality Braking
    245mm hydraulic front disc and 200mm rear disc brakes provide plenty of stopping power, while the wave-type front rotor design adds cutting-edge style.
  • Comfortable Ergonomics
    A plush and roomy riding position is ready for two, with a narrow seat design for easier flat-footing at stops, and plenty of leg space in front of the rider’s seat. Meanwhile, the passenger gets secure handholds that blend cleanly into the Zuma 125’s body design.
  • Aggressive Headlights and Styling
    Two bright halogen headlights light the way, with the sculpted bodywork smoothly wrapping around the aggressive lighting design.
  • Plenty of Storage
    The underseat storage compartment’s cavernous 7.7-gallon capacity is roomy enough for a full-face helmet, while a cup holder and fold-out cargo hook on the dash makes it easy to bring it all with you.
  • Modern Gauge Package
    The Zuma 125’s stylish LCD meter features a fuel gauge as well as a full range of indicator lights.
  • Secure and Convenient
    Zuma 125 provides both a centerstand and side stand for parking convenience. For extra security when parked, the main switch is equipped with a keyhole lock cover. And the fuel filler is found just left of the ignition switch for easy refueling.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 Photos


Links

Yamaha Motorcycles Official Websites

Sours: https://www.webbikeworld.com/2020-yamaha-zuma-125-model-overview/
  1. Opus diagnostics
  2. Diamond islands roblox
  3. Jobs doosan bobcat
  4. Chakra meditation kundalini
  5. Snap on 18v

2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 [Model Overview]

Rugged, Economical, and Fun: The 2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 / BWs 125

Japanese motorcycle manufacturers really know how to make practical and economical small-capacity scooters, and Yamaha has outdone itself with the Zuma 125—A.K.A the BWs 125 in Canada. This small commuting machine returns as part of the 2021 Yamaha line-up, bringing economical mobility to the masses. If you’re in need of something small and spritely, with enough power to make light work of city traffic, then the Zuma/BWs is the scooter for you.

The Zuma draws power from one of the smallest engines in the Yamaha range. It’s a 125 cc four-stroke unit that produces around 8 horsepower. It might not look like a big figure, but it’s more than enough for city riding. Plus, what it lacks in power, it makes up for in economy, achieving up to 103 mpg, according to Yamaha.

There’s more to the Zuma 125 than a compact engine: it’s also surprisingly comfortable, responsive, and agile. This is largely down to the Zuma’s light steel tube frame, telescopic forks, and comfortable ergonomics. For 2021, the Zuma/BSw features a refreshed design with modern rugged bodywork, LCD instrumentation, and impressive under-seat storage space too.

For 2021, the Zuma 125, or BWs 125, is available in Ultramarine Blue or Matte Black.

The 2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 starts from $3,599 USD / $3,799 CAD.

On this page:we’ve curated specs, features, news, photos/videos, etc. so you can read up on the new 2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 in one place.

2021 Yamaha Zuma 125


Model Overview

General Info

  • Price: $3,599 USD / $3,799 CAD
  • Key Features:
    • Potent fuel-injected engine
    • Electric starter
    • Fully automatic “twist and go” transmission

Main Specs

  • Engine: 125cc forced air-cooled, 4-stroke SOHC single engine
  • Power: 8 HP (Approx.)
  • Torque: N/A
  • Wet Weight: 262 lbs (119 kg)
  • Seat Height: 30.7 in (780 mm)

 

2021 Yamaha Zuma 125


2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 Specifications

From Yamaha

ENGINE

Engine
125cc forced air-cooled, 4-stroke SOHC single; 4 valves
Power8 HP
Bore x Stroke
Compression Ratio
Fuel System
StarterElectric
Lubrication

DRIVETRAIN

Clutch
Transmission
Final DriveV-Belt

CHASSIS

Suspension Front
Suspension Rear
Brakes Front
Brakes Rear
Tires Front
Tires Rear
Fuel Tank Capacity
ColorUltramarine Blue, Matte Black

ELECTRICAL

Ignition
Digital TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Spark Plugs
HeadlightLED
Tail LightLED

DIMENSIONS

Overall Length
Overall Width 30.1 in
Overall Height44.3 in
Wheelbase
Ground Clearance
Seat Height
Wet Weight

WARRANTY

Warranty1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)
Extension

2021 Yamaha Zuma 125


2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 Features

Rugged, Modern Design
Beneath the sleek styling, the Zuma 125 is built around a strong steel frame with fat, aggressive tires on cast aluminum wheels, tough suspension, and protective off-road-style brush deflectors and fork tube boots. This scooter boasts capability on roads of all sorts, with plenty of attitude for your daily commute.
Potent Fuel Injected Engine
Powering the Zuma 125 is a compact 125cc 4-stroke engine with 4 valves, a 10:1 compression ratio, ceramic-composite cylinder liner, and electronic fuel injection—giving this scooter modern reliability and economical performance. With an amazing 103 mpg* and a 1.7- gallon fuel tank, you get plenty of range, too.
Automatic Convenience
A fully-automatic V-belt transmission and push-button electric starting make the Zuma 125 super-convenient transportation. Standard center and side stands, along with a locking cover on the ignition switch, make it easy and secure to park, too.
Roomy, Step-Through Ergonomics
There’s room for two atop the Zuma 125’s seat and lots of locking storage beneath it. The step-through floorboards making getting on and off a breeze, too.
Zuma 125’s fuel-injected, 125cc single cylinder, 4-stroke engine pumps out lots of power for its size, using an SOHC 4-valve head with 10:1 compression ratio and ceramic-composite cylinder plating. Fuel injection provides the optimal fuel mixture for varying conditions, and that means easy cold starts, too.
Electric Starter
Push-button electric starting makes the Zuma 125 super-convenient for transportation.
Modern Reliability
For reliability and easy maintenance, simple wet-sump lubrication is used. Forced air cooling system helps keep engine temperatures under control, even while idling at stoplights, for maximum efficiency and longer engine life.
Automatic Convenience
Fully automatic, V-belt transmission with centrifugal clutch provides easy, twist-the-throttle-and-go operation with great off-the-line acceleration.
Ready to Get Dirty
Oiled-paper type air filter helps trap dirt before it gets to your engine, even when riding on unpaved roads. The V-belt housing has its own off-road-style wet-foam air filter for durability.
Clean-Running Design
Upswept muffler incorporates exhaust catalyst technology to reduce air pollution and meet emission regulations.
Hardy Steel Frame
Robust steel-tube frame is light but strong, and features a step-through design for easy mounting. A two-stage electrostatic painting process provides a durable, corrosion-resistant finish.
Durable Suspension
Telescopic fork features beefy outer tubes for strength, while fork boots help protect the large 33mm inner tubes from debris. The swingarm features twin rear shocks with a full 3.1 in of travel for riding comfort on the street and unpaved roads, too.
Generous Fuel Range
Fuel tank holds 1.7 gallons for plenty of cruising range. Fuel tank emissions system includes a charcoal canister to control gasoline evaporation and reduce air pollution.
Heavy-Duty Tires and Wheels
Fat 120/70-12 front and 130/70-12 rear tires have an aggressive looking block pattern for great handling on unpaved roads and on the street. Tires run on lightweight five-spoke die-cast aluminum wheels.
High Quality Braking
245mm hydraulic front disc and 200mm rear disc brakes provide plenty of stopping power while the wave-type front rotor design adds cutting-edge style.
Comfortable Ergonomics
A plush and roomy riding position is ready for two, with a narrow seat design for easier flat-footing at stops, and plenty of leg space in front of the rider’s seat. Meanwhile, the passenger gets secure handholds that blend cleanly into the Zuma 125’s body design.
Aggressive Headlights and Styling
Two bright halogen headlights light the way, with the sculpted bodywork smoothly wrapping around the aggressive lighting design.
Plenty of Storage
The underseat storage compartment’s cavernous 7.7-gallon capacity is roomy enough for a full-face helmet, while a cup holder and fold-out cargo hook on the dash makes it easy to bring it all with you.
Modern Gauge Package
The Zuma 125’s stylish LCD meter features a fuel gauge as well as a full range of indicator lights.
Secure and Convenient
Zuma 125 provides both a centerstand and side stand for parking convenience. For extra security when parked, the main switch is equipped with a keyhole lock cover. And the fuel filler is found just left of the ignition switch for easy refueling.

2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 Photos


2021 Yamaha Zuma 125 Videos


Links

Yamaha Motorcycles Official Websites

Sours: https://www.webbikeworld.com/2021-yamaha-zuma-125/
2020 Yamaha Zuma 125

2020 Yamaha Zuma 1252020 Yamaha Zuma 1252020 Yamaha Zuma 125

RUGGED SPORT.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125:

The definitive option in its class, with ultra‑modern rugged styling, fuel efficient power and big features in a compact package.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 Totalmotorcycle.com Key Features

Rugged, Modern Design
Beneath the sleek styling, the Zuma 125 is built around a strong steel frame with fat, aggressive tires on cast aluminum wheels, tough suspension, and protective off-road-style brush deflectors and fork tube boots. This scooter boasts capability on roads of all sorts, with plenty of attitude for your daily commute.

Potent Fuel Injected Engine
Powering the Zuma 125 is a compact 125cc 4-stroke engine with 4 valves, a 10:1 compression ratio, ceramic-composite cylinder liner, and electronic fuel injection—giving this scooter modern reliability and economical performance. With an amazing 103 mpg* and a 1.7- gallon fuel tank, you get  plenty of range, too.

Automatic Convenience
A fully-automatic V-belt transmission and push-button electric starting make the Zuma 125 super-convenient transportation. Standard center and side stands, along with a locking cover on the ignition switch, make it easy and secure to park, too.

Roomy, Step- Through Ergonomics
There’s room for two atop the Zuma 125’s seat, and lots of locking storage beneath it. The step-through floorboards making getting on and off a breeze, too.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 Totalmotorcycle.com Features and Benefits

ENGINE

Potent Fuel Injected Engine
Zuma 125’s fuel-injected, 125cc single cylinder, 4-stroke engine pumps out lots of power for its size, using an SOHC 4-valve head with 10:1 compression ratio and ceramic-composite cylinder plating. Fuel injection provides the optimal fuel mixture for varying conditions, andthat means easy cold starts, too.

—Electric Starter
Pushbutton electric starting makes the Zuma 125 super-convenient for transportation.

—Modern Reliability
For reliability and easy maintenance, simple wet-sump lubrication is used. Forced air cooling system helps keep engine temperatures under control, even while idling at stoplights, for maximum efficiency and longer engine life.

—Automatic Convenience
Fully automatic, V-belt transmission with centrifugal clutch provides easy, twist-the-throttle-and-go operation with great off-the-line acceleration.

—Ready to Get Dirty
Oiled-paper type air filter helps trap dirt before it gets to your engine, even when riding on unpaved roads. The V-belt housing has its own off-road-style wet-foam air filter for durability.

—Clean-Running Design
Upswept muffler incorporates exhaust catalyst technology to reduce air pollution and meet emission regulations.

CHASSIS/SUSPENSION

Hardy Steel Frame
Robust steel-tube frame is light but strong, and features a step-through design for easy mounting. A two-stage electrostatic painting process provides a durable, corrosion-resistant finish.

—Durable Suspension
Telescopic fork features beefy outer tubes for strength, while fork boots help protect the large 33mm inner tubes from debris. The swingarm features twin rear shocks with a full 3.1 in of travel for riding comfort on the street and unpaved roads, too.

Generous Fuel Range
Fuel tank holds 1.7 gallons for plenty of cruising range. Fuel tank emissions system includes a charcoal canister to control gasoline evaporation and reduce air pollution.

—Heavy-Duty Tires and Wheels
Fat 120/70-12 front and 130/70-12 rear tires have an aggressive looking block pattern for great handling on unpaved roads and on the street. Tires run on lightweight five-spoke die-cast aluminum wheels.

—High Quality Braking
245mm hydraulic front disc and 200mm rear disc brakes provide plenty of stopping power, while the wave-type front rotor design adds cutting-edge style.

—Comfortable Ergonomics
A plush and roomy riding position is ready for two, with a narrow seat design for easier flat-footing at stops, and plenty of leg space in front of the rider’s seat. Meanwhile, the passenger gets secure handholds that blend cleanly into the Zuma 125’s body design.

ADDITIONAL FEATURES

Aggressive Headlights and Styling
Two bright halogen headlights light the way, with the sculpted bodywork smoothly wrapping around the aggressive lighting design.

—Plenty of Storage
The underseat storage compartment’s cavernous 7.7-gallon capacity is roomy enough for a full-face helmet, while a cup holder and fold-out cargo hook on the dash makes it easy to bring it all with you.

—Modern Gauge Package
The Zuma 125’s stylish LCD meter features a fuel gauge as well as a full range of indicator lights.

—Secure and Convenient
Zuma 125 provides both a centerstand and side stand for parking convenience. For extra security when parked, the main switch is equipped with a keyhole lock cover. And the fuel filler is found just left of the ignition switch for easy refueling.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 – Totalmotorcycle.com USA Specifications/Technical Details
US MSRP Price: $3,499 – Sandy Beige
Canada MSRP Price: $NA CDN
Europe/UK MSRP Price: £See dealer for pricing in GBP (On The Road inc 20% Vat)
Australia MSRP Price: See dealer for pricing in AU

Engine Type 125cc forced air-cooled, 4-stroke SOHC single; 4
valves
Bore x Stroke 52.4mm x 57.9mm
Compression Ratio 10.0:1
Fuel Delivery Fuel injection
Ignition Digital TCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
Transmission V-Belt automatic
Suspension / Front Telescopic forks
Suspension / Rear Dual shocks
Brakes / Front Hydraulic disc, 245mm
Brakes / Rear Hydraulic disc, 200mm
Tires / Front 120/70-12
Tires / Rear 130/70-12
L x W x H 75.2 in x 30.1 in x 44.3 in
Seat Height 30.7 in
Wheelbase 51.4 in
Rake (Castor Angle) 27.0°
Trail 3.7 in
Maximum Ground
Clearance
4.9 in
Fuel Capacity 1.7 gal
Fuel Economy** 103 mpg
Wet Weight*** 262 lb
Warranty 1 Year (Limited Factory Warranty)
Color Matte Black; Ultramarine Blue

*** Wet weight includes the vehicle with all standard equipment and all fluids, including oil, coolant (as
applicable) and a full tank of fuel. It does not include the weight of options or accessories. Wet weight is
useful in making real-world comparisons with other models.

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 – Totalmotorcycle.com Canada Specifications/Technical Details

See BWS125

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 – Totalmotorcycle.com European Specifications/Technical Details

NA

2020 Yamaha Zuma 125 – Totalmotorcycle.com Australian Specifications/Technical Details

Manufacturer Specifications and appearance are subject to change without prior notice on Total Motorcycle (TMW).

Sours: https://www.totalmotorcycle.com/motorcycles/2020/2020-yamaha-zuma-125

Review zuma 2020 yamaha 125

Yamaha Zuma 125 Design

  • Plush and cushy two-up seating
  • Halogen headlight
  • Generous underseat storage
  • LCD display
  • center stand for parking convenience
  • Rugged styling

Modern and minimal. That’s the first thing that came to mind when I first beheld the Yamaha Zuma 125. There’s absolutely nothing in the way of fat or fluff to be found here, just the bare essentials. A minimal front fairing houses side-by-side, high- and low-beam headlights atop a high-mount mudguard. The handlebar area is completely naked without even a flyscreen to protect the rider or the single-clock instrument cluster. This leaves your entire trunk exposed to the wind, but on the bright side at least your helmet vents will get the airflow they need to work properly.

Narrow at the entry, the skinniness continues into the legguard to form a minimal protective pocket for the lower extremities. A locking fuel door in the left side of the inner fairing provides convenient access for refueling, but something about the fuel tube and vent causes the system to burp small amounts of fuel during refueling operations. It’s a minor complaint and one of the few you’ll hear from owners.

A panel-over-pipe construction uses tubular steel members for strength, and allows for a full step-through with a side-to-side flat deck. Normally I’d tout the ’tween-feet storage, but the Zuma is so narrow, you aren’t likely to carry very much down there. Storage for your helmet or cargo space for a grocery-getting mission is in the 7.7-gallon, underseat storage compartment. A flip-out hook and cup holder finishes out the storage options, unless you count the grab rails around the pillion seat that are handy spots to hang a bungee net and turn your p-pad into a casual luggage rack.

A molded-in taillight housing keeps the “subframe” area clean, and the rear turn signals come on short standoffs, just like the front. Overall, a rather sporty, if angular, little ride. I hesitate calling it unattractive, but it’s more a rugged design and will appeal to folks looking for a less-than-cutesy-looking scooter.

Yamaha Zuma 125 Chassis

  • Strong steel frame
  • Beefy 33 mm front forks
  • No-nonsense 12-inch wheels
  • Front and rear disc brakes
  • Crisp handling

A tubular-steel underframe on the Zuma 125 stiffens the assembly and gives it a 27-degree steering head angle for 3.7 inches of trail and crisp handling in spite of its fat tires. Cast-aluminum rims run a 12-inch diameter with a 120/70 hoop up front and a 130/70 in the rear, and Yamaha picked tires specifically built for service on unimproved roads so you can at least tackle dirt roads, if not actual light terrain. The 2016 model year saw the front fork-tube diameter increased to 33 mm, up from 27 mm the year before, and the stems run with bellowed fork gaiters to protect the inner fork tube and fork seal. Plus, they look kinda cool and that never hurts.

A pair of coil-over shocks support the swing-mount drivetrain with 3.1 inches of travel on tap to absorbs life’s little bumps. Like the suspension components, the brakes were updated in ’16 as well. The factory bumped the front brake diameter up to 245 mm from 220 mm, and it dropped the rear drum brake altogether in favor of all-around hydraulic discs. That’s a nice step up, but I leave it to the reader to decide whether the lack of ABS is a downside or not. I like the simplicity and honest feedback at the levers and am well accustomed to riding sans safety nets.

Yamaha opted for a wave-cut front rotor that dissipates heat more efficiently than a plain round disc, and the shape provides a bit of a self-cleaning service for the front brake. Yamaha touts the Zuma as a sort-of “go anywhere” scooter, but in actuality, the 4.9-inch ground clearance and limited suspension travel sharply curtails the scope of the word “anywhere.”

Yamaha Zuma 125 Drivetrain

  • 125 cc single cylinder engine
  • Generous fuel economy
  • Forced-air cooling
  • Snappy throttle response

Yamaha powers the Zuma 125 with a 125 cc thumper that runs an undersquare layout with a 52.4 mm bore and 57.9 mm stroke. A ceramic-composite cylinder coating replaces the heavy and expensive sleeve. The factory has some experience with this technology, and claims it provides superior heat transfer and wear resistance.

Forced-air cooling removes waste heat. In my opinion, that’s the best of both worlds. You get the simplicity of air-cooling with the greater, traffic-sitting capacity of a liquid-cooled mill. Honestly, though, if you’re on one of these, what are you doing sitting in traffic anyway?

A SOHC times the four-valve head, and a 24 mm Mikuni throttle body manages the induction. Mileage with this plant falls out just over 100 mpg, but the spicy compression ratio will put you at the premium pump.

At 6,000 rpm, the mill cranks out 7 pound-feet of torque, power that gets the 262-pound wet weight moving quick, fast, and in a hurry. Electric start and a Continuously Variable Transmission rounds out the rider’s convenience features for push-button-twist-and-go operation.

Yamaha Zuma 125 Pricing

The MY2021 Zuma 125 is out and available for $3,599, just a skosh up from last year. Colorways carried over, though, with a choice between Matte Black or Ultramarine Blue.

Yamaha Zuma 125 Competitors

There are plenty of big-name scooter makers out there, but it’s hard to beat Yamaha for name recognition. Instead of looking to the other powerhouses, I took a look at a big but little-known maker and found a match with the Lance PCH 125.

Lance PCH

The Lance has a less pronounced shape at the front fairing, and it carries the mudguard low as a slider-mount for less of the “bird’s beak” effect. Up top, the PCH carries a small flyscreen that definitely protects the instrument cluster and probably little else. Both sport the full step-through with a flat deck, something I’m always glad to see.

Chassis builds are remarkably similar with telescopic forks and hydraulic brakes, but Lance runs the old-fashioned rear drum brakeand it falls behind in disc diameter with only 190 mm up front against the 245 mm Yamaha disc. Twelve-inch, cast-aluminum rims are a constant across the board, as are the 120/70 front and 130/70 rear hoops.

One big advantage Lance brings to the table is a much greater ground clearance. At 8.1-inches high, the PCH has the frame-to-ground clearance to be more off-road-tastic than the Zuma would dare. I’m not saying the PCH is good for off-road work, merely saying that it might suck less at negotiating light terrain, at least.

The engines are likewise similar. One-lung thumpers rule the day with fancy cylinder coatings and air cooling all around. CVT gearboxes provide the effortless riding scooter riders are accustomed to, and the only difference I see between the two lies in the 6.14 pound-foot of torque from the PCH that falls a bit short of Yamaha’s 7 pounds o’ grunt, and a lower compression ratio of 9.6-to-1 that isn’t lower enough to get you to a less expensive gas pump.

Naturally, Lance is able to let loose of the PCH 125 for a low $1,899 price, much lower than the $3,399 sticker on the Zuma. I know Yamaha’s name-power counts for a lot, but does it count that much? You’ll have to decide.

Read our full review of the Lance PCH125.

He Said

My husband and fellow motorcycle writer, TJ Hinton, says, “Argh! Another bloody, lower-midsize scooter that looks like a bajillion others just like it. Looking at the competitor I got the feeling that neither would be in service very long over here, where road speeds and the driving culture in general will force people to “outgrow” such a small ride rather quickly. I can see this as a much bigger seller in Asian markets, to be sure.”

She Said

"Having never lived in a densely populated urban area, my husband doesn’t see the point. I do. Around campus, in the city where parking space is precious real estate, and just as an errand-go-getter, scooters are great and this 125 cc size is, in my opinion, a better option than a 50 cc for capabilities and safety."

Yamaha Zuma 125 Specifications

Further Reading

Yamaha

Read more Yamaha news.

Allyn Hinton

Writer and Associate Motorcycle Editor - [email protected]

If it had moving parts, it had Allyn's interest from a very early age. At age 11 when bicycles were too simple to hold her interest any longer, her father found her taking apart the lawn mower. When he asked why she was doing it, she replied, “I need to see how it works.” That curiosity and mechanical drive served her well over the next 40 years as she pursued careers in both the automotive and motorcycle industries. Having shared her love of motorcycles with her now husband, biker TJ Hinton, Allyn brings that love and knowledge to TopSpeed as writer and associate motorcycle editor.  Read full bio

About the author
Sours: https://www.topspeed.com/motorcycles/motorcycle-reviews/yamaha/2016-2021-yamaha-zuma-125-ar176226.html

Review of the Yamaha Zuma 125

If you live in a college town (and scooter use isn’t strictly limited to moped-legal machines) take a look at where the scooters are parked. Odds are pretty good that you’ll see a bunch of them with two large headlights up front and a Yamaha logo. The YamahaYahamah Zuma 125 good and bad Zuma came out in 1989 as a 50cc 2-stroke and it rapidly became the “performance 50” of choice. Because the Zuma was a good quality scooter to begin with, they tended to hold up well to performance add-ons and modifications. Yamaha stopped bringing the Zuma 50 here for a couple of years (2006-2007) and the new Zuma 50 is emission-friendly, but lacks the performance of the old model. Yamaha kept the Zuma name going with a 125cc 4-stroke model. The fat tires, dual headlights and rugged looks continue in this model.

The model reviewed here is a Chinese-manufactured 2009 with 4,000 miles on it. It’s well and truly broken in and in very good condition. It does have additional accessories in the form of a windshield and rear luggage rack. The stock scooter comes with a grab rail in back, but no rack.

Speedometer Reading/Speed/Fuel Economy

GPS Mounted on a Yamaha Zuma 125 ScooterIt was very easy to mount my GPS holder on the Zuma 125 as it has an exposed (naked) handlebar. The first day I had the Zuma it was quite blustery with a few strong wind gusts. I focused on lower speed readings for that day. To get an accurate reading, it’s necessary to hold the scooter at a consistent speed long enough for the GPS to get multiple signals. At 30 MPH indicated, the GPS was reading 28 or 29 MPH. When the winds died down and I could hold higher speeds I got readings that indicated the speedometer was about 5% optimistic. At 50 MPH indicated, the actual speed is 47 – 48 MPH. The odometer was VERY accurate showing JUST over 10 miles (the tenths hadn’t quite rolled over to .1) in 10 miles of actual riding. These are good numbers as most scooters read 10% to 15% optimistic with some models approaching 20% optimistic. The most I could get out of the Zuma 125 was a GPS verified 54 MPH. Keep in mind that I weigh 220 pounds. Fuel economy overall was 75 MPG. Yamaha claims up to 89 MPG. Again, I’m not a small load and I was running the scooter pretty hard. In normal city riding with an average (160 pound) rider I would expect 80ish MPG. Good, but not great for a fuel injected 125.  

Features 

The Yamaha Zuma 125 was all new in 2009. It has the same tough, off-road sort of look as the Zuma 50. Exposed steel frame tubing, fat tires, those big headlights, brush-deflectors by the handgrips, all contribute to a non-traditional scooter look. This is about as far away from the Vespa-influenced retro look as one can get in a scooter (except, maybe, for the Honda Ruckus). The Zuma is powered by a 124cc 4-stroke engine that is air-cooled, has a 4-valve head and 10:1 compression as well as ceramic-composite cylinder plating. On top of all that, it’s fuel injected.

Yamaha Zuma 125 Honda Elite 110 Piaggio Typhoon 125For comparison, I selected the Honda Elite 110 which is also fuel injected and the Paiggio Typhoon which is chasing a demographic similar to the Zuma, but is carbureted. The Zuma is the priciest of the bunch. We recently reviewed the Honda Elite 110 and hope to have a chance to spend some time with the re-designed Piaggio Typhoon in the near future. I did not include the Genuine Buddy 125 in this comparison because I believe that scooter is intended for a different market than the Zuma 125.

Yamaha Zuma 125 Twin HeadlightsThe twin headlights are one of the most distinctive features of the Yamaha Zuma 125. The right side light is the high beam and the left side is the low beam. In stock form, there is no switchYamaha Zuma 125 Instrument Cluster position that allows both to be lit up simultaneously, but if the aftermarket on the Zuma 50 is any indication, a simple wiring harness modification will likely make dual-at-the-same-time possible, if it isn’t out there already. The instrument pod is small but includes a speedometer in the center that is biased to miles per hour, and an odometer but no trip meter. To the right is a fuel gauge. To the left is an engine warning light, turn signal indicator and high beam indicator. The engine light comes on during start-up, which is normal.

Yamaha Zuma Gas CapThe ignition/multi-function switch includes an anti-theft security cover which is released by the key. The key is hinged making it easier to open the security cover. The switch also opens the seat and locks the front end. The front end lock and switch cover are nice additional security measures, but you are still better off to secure your scooter to a fixed object with a good quality lock. The 1.6 gallon fuel tank is accessed by a filler at the front tip of the seat. The gas cap is opened with the key and at a bit of an odd angle for filling. I had to be carefulYamaha Zuma 125 multi-function switch not to overflow the filler because the fill neck is cantered forward and very difficult to get to with a conventional fuel pump nozzle.

As mentioned earlier, the stock Zuma 125 comes with a grab rail in the back but no luggage rack. A nice Yamaha rack was added to the test unit and it looks perfect to accept a small topcase. There is a kind of small object tray on the front legshield on the left side. I put my insulated coffee travel mug in there and it DIDN’T bounce out on the way to the office. There is also reasonable storage under the seat. My XXL 3/4 helmet fit and I was able to get a small full face in there if I positioned the helmet just right.

There is not a luggage hook on the Zuma 125. This would allow one to carry a bag or two between one’s legs. The general idea is to have the hook secure the handles and have the bottom of the bag resting on the floorboards with a foot on either side of the bag. I suppose the hook to hold the handles is not, strictly speaking, necessary, but it surprises me that it’s absent on the Zuma.

Yamaha Zume 125 storage

Riding Impressions

Yamaha Zuma 125 seatWhen I first sat on the Zuma 125, I thought I had misread the specifications. It says 30.7 inches for seat height and I have a 30 inch inseam. At 220 pounds, I should “squish” the scooter enough to touch flat footed at stops. I could barely tip-toe this scooter. The seat height is accurate, but the seat is also fairly wide. I found myself sitting a little too forward which made the leg room feel like less than it actually is. The reach to the handlebars is good, not too low, not too high. Something about the angle and configuration of the seat made the riding position feel a little “off” to me, but not bad. On the plus side, the seat is nearly a flat-top with no big hump between the rider and passenger portions of the seat. The seat is firm, which I like. Others thought it was too firm and complained of a sore backside in pretty short order when riding.

Turn the key to on, let the system cycle, hold a brake and press the starter button – the Zuma 125 fires right up hot or cold and quickly settles into idle. Good fuel injection rocks. A twist of the throttle and we’re off. Acceleration is only adequate. Looking at the specifications of the engine (4-valve head, 10:1 compression) I expected more. As sporty as this scooter looks, the engine performance was a little disappointing. There are no real flat spots in the power curve, but no real sweet spots either. Zipping around in traffic was no problem and the Zuma 125 held 47 MPH hauling my considerable bulk up a pretty steep hill.

The suspension is firm and combines with the fat tires to eat up some rough roads. I certainly felt the rough bits, butYamaha Zuma 125 front and rear wheels didn’t bottom out. The single piston front disc and rear drum brakes did a good job of stopping the scooter when and where I wanted. I thought the fronts would a little weak, but they performed just fine. It’s easy to modulate the brakes and one has to hit the rear awfully hard to lock up the wheel. The Zuma 125 responded quickly to inputs and was easy to toss around. The fat tires and overall look of the scooter say “off-road” and I felt obliged to try some riding sans pavement. There are some gravel and sand roads not too far northeast of my house and I took the Zuma there for a spin. Those fat tires provide some confidence, but not much real traction. I certainly didn’t “off-road” the Zuma, and probably wouldn’t given the limited suspension travel and tires, but a little sand and gravel presented no troubles. Just don’t push it and the Zuma 125 will get you over the meadows and through the woods as long as you’re on some kind of road.

Fit and Finish

My experience with Honda’s Elite 110 showed that very good quality stuff can come out of China. The Yamaha Zuma 125 isn’t quite there. I’d say good but not very good. Some switches (turn signal and high beam) didn’t operate as crisply as the Elite’s. The finish on the colored panels was very good and manufacturing tolerances were tight. I’m not saying any of the components were bad, they just didn’t seem to be the kind of top tier pieces I’d expect from Yamaha. The Zuma 125 is light years ahead of the low-end stuff out of China. Put a Zuma next to a web-ordered Wildfire and you wouldn’t think they were made on the same planet. Everything functioned perfectly on the Zuma 125 and I’d expect that situation to continue for some time. Again, good, but not great.

Conclusion

Looking at the Yamaha Zuma 125, one would expect most of its buyer to be young males. Yamaha marketing tells me this is not the case. Well over half of all Zuma 125 buyers are over 30. Something like 40% of the buyers are over 48?!? OK, I guess I can see that. The engine performance is not what one would call exhilarating. The Zuma 125 is not moped legal in any state. Maybe one has to be a little more mature (sigh…. older) to understand the value of a really good city scooter. As long as you don’t expect highway riding and blistering acceleration to be part of your daily regime, the Zuma 125 will get the job done. If you like the look, it fits you, and want a solid scooter that will help you face all those nasty bumps and potholes on University Avenue (those of you in St. Paul know what I mean) the Yamaha Zuma 125 is worth a look.

Yamaha Zuma 125 Scooter

THANKS to Scooterville in Minneapolis Minnesota for providing the scooter used in this review.

David Harrington

Sours: https://www.motorscooterguide.net/yamaha-zuma-125-review/

You will also be interested:

I love him, I want to make love to him. I ran to him, happily substituted my ass for massage and was no longer afraid when he thrust his hand between my legs. On the contrary, I spread my legs wider and leaned towards him, yielded with my hips, and finished several times with a cry.

And then, to my horror, he said that there would be no more massage sessions. - How why.



3236 3237 3238 3239 3240