Strat neck humbucker

Strat neck humbucker DEFAULT

Mod Garage: The Strat-o-Tele Crossover

Last month in “Riptide Stratocaster Wiring," we tried to stuff as many Telecaster attributes as possible into a Stratocaster. At our shop, we also get numerous orders for modding Teles with Strat-flavored elements, so let's turn the crossover concept around and explore this approach. Most of these mods can be combined, so it's up to you to determine how far you want to go.


Swapping the neck pickup. Replacing the standard Telecaster neck pickup with a Stratocaster neck pickup is the least invasive mod on our list. It's no secret that many Fender players love the sound of a Stratocaster's neck pickup, and mounting a favorite Strat-style neck pickup in your Tele is a great way to make selector-switch position 3 come alive.

Of course, this will alter the tone of position 2—neck and bridge pickups in parallel—but fortunately a Tele bridge pickup sounds really good combined with a Strat neck pickup, so you don't suffer sonically when you hit that middle position. Finding the perfect balance between the pickups is simply a matter of playing with their height adjustment screws.

As a bonus, you can use a reverse wound/reverse polarity (RWRP) neck pickup so you get a hum-free tone with both pickups engaged. RWRP neck pickups aren't common, but you can get around this by installing a Strat's RWRP middle pickup in the Tele's neck position, and those are readily available. Alternatively, any boutique pickup maker should have no problem winding a RWRP Strat neck pickup for you. But be sure to have the bridge pickup specs at hand when chasing a RWRP mate for it. Otherwise you might wind up with an out-of-phase tone or simply not get the hum-cancelling benefit in position 2.

Now, as you might have guessed, there's a size consideration: A Stratocaster pickup is slightly bigger than a standard Telecaster neck pickup, so to make the former fit it's necessary to enlarge the body routing and pickguard hole.

You'll also need to decide whether you want to keep the traditional Telecaster mounting system of two screws that penetrate the wood and hide under the pickguard, or if you want to take the Stratocaster approach and drill two screw holes through the pickguard and then mount the pickup on it.

Some companies sell Strat neck pickups in Telecaster size, which makes it a one-to-one exchange, and you still have the option of switching to Stratocaster-style mounting. Makers offering such specialty pickups include Don Mare (S-Telly), Lollar (Royal T), and Harmonic Design (Mini-Strat Neck Pickup). Even Fender incorporated this mod in their Jerry Donahue Telecaster, Clarence White Telecaster, and some of the Teles in their California series.

Swapping the bridge pickup. This mod isn't requested very often because most players like the tone of the Telecaster's bridge pickup, but I want to mention it to make the list complete. As you probably know, you can't simply put a Stratocaster bridge pickup into a standard Telecaster bridge because of the different mounting systems and sizes. A Tele bridge pickup usually has three mounting holes, while Strat pickups have only two.

That said, if you're a hardcore DIY person, it shouldn't be a problem to convert any Strat pickup to Telecaster specs. My friend Magnus Plaue, one of the biggest DIY nerds I know, has written a nice essay about this operation. He calls it “single-bucking" because he wanted to squeeze a Strat humbucker into one of his Teles. You can read it here. I've never seen a commercial solution for this (if you know of one, please tell me), but any skilled pickup maker should be able to fabricate a custom order for you.

Most of these mods can be combined, so it's up to you to determine how far you want to go.

Adding a Strat middle pickup. Another good way to access Strat tones from your Tele is to install a third pickup in the middle position. Brent Mason did this on his No. 1 Tele, and there are also some Fender models, like the James Burton Telecaster and the Nashville Telecaster series, that are made this way (Photo 1). This is essentially a Stratocaster wiring on a Telecaster platform, and there are three popular ways to configure it.

• Nashville wiring. Swapping out the Tele 3-way pickup selector for a Strat 5-way switch yields the standard Stratocaster wiring, but with a Tele-style master tone.

• Nashville B-Bender wiring. Identical to the Nashville wiring, except position 3 selects the bridge and neck pickups in parallel, instead of the middle pickup alone.

• Blend wiring: This is the system Brent Mason made popular. It's based on a standard Telecaster wiring with a 3-way switch, but you add a third pot to the control plate for blending in the middle pickup.

You can enhance these three configurations with additional mods, such as out-of-phase or series/parallel switching. We'll examine these wiring options in future columns.

Adding a middle pickup requires routing a new pickup cavity, but at least you won't have to mess with your original pickguard because there are many Tele-style pickguards designed to house a middle pickup. That's a good indication of how popular this mod is! Again, you can mount the pickup directly to the body or suspend it from the pickguard. There are two common configurations: Strat middle pickup plus Telecaster neck pickup, or Strat middle and neck pickups. As you can see, there's a lot to experiment with here.

If you don't want to alter your Tele's appearance, there's another stealthy way to add a middle pickup. This Marauder-inspired approach uses a special pickup with flush pole pieces installed underneath the pickguard where it's not visible. A standard plastic pickguard won't interfere with the pickup, but don't use a metal pickguard with this stealth setup. To compensate for being further from the strings, the pickup should have more power—your pickup maker will know what to do. We explored this subject in “The Luthercaster Esquire Wiring."

Semi out-of-phase mod. If you lust for the Stratocaster's clucky, dual-pickup tones but don't want to change your Tele's pickups, you'll like this mod. All you have to do is swap the 3-way switch for a 5-way switch and implement a trick used by Fender for their Jerry Donahue signature Telecaster and by Peavey for their Omniac JD model.

First, some background: Phase difference is measured in degrees. Totally in-phase signals have either 0 or 360 degrees of difference (the latter is equivalent to none). Totally out-of-phase signals have a 180-degree difference. This mod shifts one signal half out of phase, which means there's either 90 or 270 degrees of difference between the Tele's two pickups. It turns out that half out-of-phase wiring is perfect for mimicking positions 2 and 4—the dual-pickup settings—on a Stratocaster. (Of course, on a Strat the pickups are actually wired in phase. The “in-between" sounds we know and love result from how the pickups are physically located in relation to each other, and the comb filtering that occurs when the middle and bridge or middle and neck pickups are both engaged.)

When a signal passes through a capacitor, the voltage leads the current by 90 degrees. So the basic theory behind this wiring is to send one pickup's signal through a capacitor to shift its phase by 90 degrees—exactly half of 180 degrees. Compared to the fully out-of-phase sound, the semi out-of-phase setting delivers a richer tone with more midrange and lows. We've looked into this before, so for more details and the circuit drawing, check out “The Bill Lawrence 5-Way Telecaster Circuit."

There you have it! Next month we'll investigate what I like to call “virtual tone controls," so stay tuned. Until then, keep on modding!

Sours: https://www.premierguitar.com/pro-advice/mod-garage-the-strat-o-tele-crossover

Neck humbucker in a super strat?

Hiya,

further to my other thread about bridge HBs, I'm keen to get suggestions when it comes to neck humbuckers in a 2-HB super strat (alder body, maple neck). The bridge is pretty hot and will most likely remain that way - either the Tonezone currently in there or some JB-style equivalent.

But having never owned a bolt-on, twin-humbucker guitar, I'm not quite sure of the dos and donts of matching something in the neck. At the moment there is a Dimarzio Evolution in there and I'm not overly fond of it. It's hot (bout 13k) and ceramic, and I'm not into proper technical shred so I don't think it suits my needs all that well. Lacks a bit of warmth when distorted and when clean(er), it's a bit too bright and stiff for me. Essentially, to my ears it sounds like a slightly different version of the bridge...

The way I'd use the neck pickup in this is:

- clean
- crunchy/bluesy solos
- all-out "liquid" soloing but not super technical

So really, I'm thinking more lower-output, perhaps even PAF territory. But as I said, while I know and love different PAF types in mahogany, short-scale, glued-neck guitars, I have 0 references when it comes to strats.

Any issues running a lower output pickup in the neck? Any particular magnet / wire types that are better suited to that sort of guitar and the sounds I'm after? If you have any favourites for that sort of setup, I'm all ears!

Thanks in advance

Click here to see me butchering some classic solos!

0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom
Sours: https://www.thefretboard.co.uk/discussion/154541/neck-humbucker-in-a-super-strat
  1. Congratulations memes
  2. Mainstay meal prep
  3. J5create driver
  4. Wall mounted retractable desk

A Guide to Fender Single-Coil Stratocaster Pickups

Since Leo Fender initially introduced it in 1954, the traditional Fender Stratocaster has been known to have three single-coil pickups, and in the six-plus decades since that historic day, that design hasn’t changed much.

That being said, single-coil pickups have certainly evolved over the years, allowing players to get different tones while staying within the parameters of a Strat outfitted with a trio of single-coils.

After all, an electric guitar pickup plays a huge part in your guitar’s sound, but just how they do that can be quite confusing to the beginner.

This is primarily a guide for those looking to dial in their tone with a pickup mod, so while we won’t be getting into the minutiae of how a pickup operates it can serve as a guide for those looking to learn more about what could be considered a guitar’s “engine.”

Looking for a beginner guitar? Our interactive gear guide, FindYour.Fender.com, matches you with the perfect model by learning about your sound & style. You’ll be well on your way to finding the right guitar for you.

READ MORE: Consider the Pickup: How to Amplify Your Acoustic
READ MORE: Decoding Standard Pickup Arrangements


How Do Pickups Work?

While they come in a variety of shapes and sizes, all pickups essentially operate the same. Pickups translate a string’s vibration into an electric signal that flows through an amp or a mixer and then through a speaker to make a sound.

To pick up that vibration, a magnetic field is projected from a magnet that is wrapped in several thousand turns of copper wire. When a string vibrates, it disturbs the field, thus creating the electrical current to amplify.

READ MORE: What Are Alnico Pickups?
READ MORE: What Are Pickup Poles? And Why Are They So Important?


What Does It Mean When a Pickup Is "Hot"?

The stronger the signal sent to the amp, the higher output a pickup has, meaning the sound through the speaker will distort more easily. The more readily the pickup distorts, the “hotter” it is.

All things being equal, a pickup that has considerably more windings of wire will have a higher output. The increased voltage generally means more mid-range frequencies and less high frequencies.

Hot pickups gained popularity in the 1970s, when amps with lots of gain and overdrive pedals were just coming along and hard rock was on the rise.


Single-Coil Sounds

There are many different kinds of pickups, but here we'll be honing in on Fender's available single-coil Stratocaster pickups in the classic three-pickup Strat series — neck, middle and bridge.

In general you'll get a brighter, snappier sound from the neck position pickup, and bridge pickups are considered "hotter" or more powerful. But that singular Strat sound has more to do with the overlooked middle pickup than the other two. Engage the the middle pickup along with either the neck or bridge to get that signature snap. (And get to know the Strat's five-way selector switch.)

READ MORE: The Difference Between Strat and Tele Bridge Pickups
READ MORE: What Is a Humbucker and How Does It "Buck" the Hum?
READ MORE: The Difference Between Active and Passive Pickups


How Much Are Pickups?

That depends.

Fender recently released a limited run of 300 Ancho Poblano Strat pickups hand wound by Master Pickup Winder Josefina Campos. Those will run you a cool $500, while the most affordable upgrade on this list can be found in the Fender Tex-Mex Strat pickups, which come in at $99.99.

At the end of the day though, there's no better way to improve your tone than to upgrade your PUPs.



Fender Custom Shop Custom '69 Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/s1MGlPaq3vw

Fender Custom Shop Custom '69 Strat single-coil pickups produce the full, punchy tone that defined rock in the late '60s and is especially effective with pedals.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 5/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 5/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 5/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 1/5

Fender Custom Shop Custom '54 Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/LtlOr7FVQXw

Our Fender Custom Shop Custom '54 Strat pickups authentically recreate the clear tones and heightened sustain that made the Stratocaster the most revered guitar in rock history. These single-coil pickups are crafted to faithfully replicate the cutting tones reminiscent of 1954 Stratocaster guitars.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 3/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5

Eric Johnson Signature Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/j6PaK5q0Xyk

Fender's R&D engineers worked closely with world renowned guitarist and tone connoisseur Eric Johnson to craft the Eric Johnson Signature Stratocaster pickups for his uniquely articulate sound. Carefully blending Leo's legacy with EJ's modern discerning sonic tastes, these Strat pickups are a key element of EJ's unmistakably pure tone. Each pickup is unique in structure and performance. The neck pickup is based on a '54 Strat pickup with oversized alnico 3 magnets. The middle pickup, based on a '63 Strat pickup, uses specially treated alnico magnets and is reverse wound to cancel hum when used with the neck or bridge pickup. The bridge pickup uses alnico 5 magnets and is specially voiced to be hotter without sacrificing that sweet top end sparkle.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 8/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 7/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 8/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 7/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 6/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5

Fender Custom Shop Fat '50s Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/2vfwSZEO-Do

Fender Custom Shop Fat '50s Strat pickups deliver the single-coil 1950s Stratocaster sound you know and love. Hot-rodded wiring design delivers enhanced bass response and an extra shot of 21st-century attitude.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 3/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5

Pure Vintage '59 Strat Pickups16395-Vintage-59-Strat-Pickups From vintage bobbin construction to genuine original-era cloth wiring, all Fender Pure Vintage pickups are wound to precise specifications for authentic, traditional Fender tone and performance. Built to evoke the original era of the Fender Stratocaster, these single-coil '59 Strat pickups produce round, warm tone with a sweet edge.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5

PUure Vintage '65 Strat Pickups16395-Vintage-65-Strat-Pickups No other pickups give you the powerful, clean and clear surf rock tones of mid-'60s Stratocaster guitars like dutifully constructed, meaty-sounding Pure Vintage '65 Strat pickups.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 2/5

Gen 4 Noiseless Stratocaster Pickups16395-Gen-4-Strat-Pickups With the all-new Gen 4 Noiseless Stratocaster pickups we've achieved the sonic equivalent of cold fusion—authentic vintage-style Fender tone combined with noise-free performance. A quantum leap in pickup technology, these are the pinnacle of our pickup designs, offering crisp, clear cleans as well as gigantic overdriven tones that are bursting with pure rock power.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 6/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 6/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 3/5

Fender Tex-Mex Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/lB8mPNqdilc

Fender Tex-Mex Strat single-coil pickups offer increased output, sparkling highs and attention-grabbing warm tone that keeps all the characteristics of your favorite vintage-style Stratocaster. From Texas grit to soaring clean tone, they're the pickups of choice for versatile players and can be found on the Jimmie Vaughan Tex-Mex Stratocaster.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 5/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 3/5

Fender Vintage Noiseless Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/xmcqVXRI8S0

Vintage Noiseless Strat pickups produce all the brilliant clarity, definition and harmonic attributes of vintage single-coil Strat tone without the hum. Get the prized early Stratocaster tone with modern circuitry and craftsmanship.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 3/10 | BASS — 5/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 3/10 | BASS — 5/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 3/10 | BASS — 4/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 3/5

Fender Custom Shop Texas Special Strat PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/cf-pZt_OBys

Found in Fender American Special Stratocaster guitars and characterized by their midrange chirp, crystalline highs and tight bass, Fender Texas Special Strat pickups feature an overwound single-coil construction that produces big Texas-blues tone.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 8/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 4/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 4/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 7/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 8/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 4/5

Fender Deluxe Drive Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/J9alBirNikE

Fender Deluxe Drive Stratocaster pickups are supercharged with the highest output of all our single-coil pickups. The pickups' overwound design makes them ideal for high-gain amp settings, but they also sparkle brilliantly when clean.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 4/10 | MID — 5/10 | BASS — 6/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 6/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 6/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 4/5

Fender Original '57/'62 Stratocaster PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/pzWDtTMaeQw

Fender Original '57/'62 Strat single-coil pickups are reverse-engineered from a 1963 Stratocaster guitar. These pickups deliver vintage-Strat sound, feel and vibe, with glistening highs and warm lows.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 4/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 4/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 4/10 | BASS — 4/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 5/5

Fender Hot Noiseless Strat PickupsEmbedded content: https://youtu.be/Ttm0ERWw9-M

Fender Hot Noiseless Strat pickups can be found in the Jeff Beck Signature Stratocaster guitars exude tone that combines warmth and punch with cutting bluesy articulation, with a screaming high-gain bridge pickup. And thanks to Fender's state-of-the-art Noiseless design, the clean, full sound is free of hum.

NECK PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10

MIDDLE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10

BRIDGE PICKUP

TREBLE — 5/10 | MID — 6/10 | BASS — 5/10

TOTAL POWER RATING: 5/5

Sours: https://www.fender.com/articles/gear/a-guide-to-fender-single-coil-stratocaster-pickups
A Stratocaster with PAF Humbuckers

Humbuckers on Strats!?


Hi Guys,

As much as we all love buying guitars, there's always that money issue, and am thinking about making my Strat as versatile as possible and am looking into changing the pick-ups, including adding a humbucker.

It's a Mex and sounds pretty nice, wanting to get a pair of DiMarzio area 61 for middle and bridge, as they're 'silent' and then adding a Super Distortion to the bridge, so I can have the single coil sound with the switch in neck position, and the chunky tone on the bridge switch.

Question is, is it worth it? I'm LH so choice of electrics is sparse enough as it is. How possible/pain staking/potentially expensive is a pick-up change inc. humbucker (barring the fact I'll need a new scratchp plate!)

Thanks,

Jampot

does your body have a rout for the humbucker? It shouldn't be too hard really. Is your axe a Fender or Squier?

Quote:

Originally Posted by fastlanestoner➡️

does your body have a rout for the humbucker? It shouldn't be too hard really. Is your axe a Fender or Squier?

Haven't the foggiest! It's a fender standard/mex

I've been putting humbuckers on Strats since 1979. Love 'em.

I am not a fan of DiMarzio's Super Distortion pickup (13.6 Ohms). I generally prefer a lower-output model closer to PAF's output (around 8 Ohms). I currently have Carvin Holdsworth Humbuckers (8.6 Ohms) in the bridge position on my main guitars with single-coil AP11s at the neck. I can get a super-fat crunch tone as well a vintage twanginess out of the HHs and have more articulate highs than the typical high-output humbucker.
I really prefer to hear complex chords clearly rendered even with full overdrive, so I need great note definition and clarity. I also build my own axes with great care given to the wood choices, so I want to hear the sound of the guitar itself enhanced rather than the pickup's tone clouding things up.

Note: The level references of the pickups noted are actually DC resistance not output level, but these specs usually correlate pretty closely.

Lives for gear

To my ears, neither fish nor fowl. I'd rather play my Strat when i want a strat sound and play my Les Paul when I want humbucking sound. Don't like DeMarzio super distortions... no tone, just buzzzzzzsaw.

you might like this:

http://www.maggiesfarm.eu/telecaster...teve_morse.jpg

Lives for gear

My main guitar is a 2000 American Double Fat Strat. Bought it on ebay a little over a year ago.
The model I have was after upgrades were made to the American line in 2000 (rolled fingerboard, staggered tuners) but before they switched to Fender humbuckers. It has a Seymour Duncan '59 in the neck and Pearly Gates in the bridge. Before that, they were known as Big Apple Strats.
Anyway, I like it a lot. I use the neck pickup most of the time. The extra midrange and mellowed high end of the humbuckers vs. single coil is nice for me, but the longer scale and snappier response of the strings give it a unique twist.
No offense intended, but don't listen to people that say "a strat is a strat". A guitar can be whatever you want it to be. I prefer my guitar to a standard 3 single coil strat, but also see the benefit of having different guitars with different pickup combinations. Right now, I'm eyeing an Epiphone Casino for a second guitar. Figure that's a totally different animal from what I've currently got.
You don't mention what kind of sound you're after. Are you unhappy with the single coil sound on your existing setup?
As far as I know, most strats made after a certain year are routed internally to accommodate humbuckers even if they came with single coils. Just take off your pickguard and lift it enough to peek inside. That's the easiest way to get that answer.
If it's already routed for humbuckers, then your job is easy. Buy a new pickguard with the right size holes and buy whatever humbucker models you want to try. Do some research on wiring and solder the new ones in yourself. It can be a fun project.
Good luck!

Quote:

I'd rather play my Strat when i want a strat sound and play my Les Paul when I want humbucking sound.

Good thing Eddie Van Halen didn't subscribe to this ideology.

Lives for gear

Always liked SSH on a strat.

Lives for gear

Quote:

Originally Posted by ears2thesky➡️

Good thing Eddie Van Halen didn't subscribe to this ideology.

Yeah, he didn't play either. At least, not when he 'made it'.

Lives for gear

 
ksandvik's Avatar

Bridge HH makes sense, elsewhere not.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ears2thesky➡️

Good thing Eddie Van Halen didn't subscribe to this ideology.

This is the kind of thing I'm after. A nice twang that's characteristic of the strat with the versatility of having the chunky humbucker sound. I'm wanting to turn it from a great guitar to a great all round recording and versatile guitar.

Since 85,and being left handed also,Iv'e put a Seymour Duncan JB in the bridge of all the strat ""type" guitars,Iv'e had.

I only got my first real Les Paul a year ago,and its great,however,it has made me realise how good my junkers with decent pickups/real Floyds,were all along!
RK

Quote:

Originally Posted by ksandvik➡️

Bridge HH makes sense, elsewhere not.

Don't tell that to Elliott Randall.

if you don't want to rout out the body, numerous duncan (and other pickups that are a humbucker in a strat shape. Add a push/pull pot, and you can have your humbucker and a single coil too. On my mexi strat, I have Duckbuckers in the neck and middle, and a JB Jr. in the back. I'll probably swap out the JB Jr. for something else as I have 2 teles with humbuckers front and rear.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tinderwet➡️

Don't tell that to Elliott Randall.

It was Elliott that made me think about it really! Seeing him play his strat a couple of times is quite an experience when it sounds as gorgeous as it does!

Gear Nut

Depending on what kind of sound you are looking for it can make a huge difference for not much money. The sound between different humbuckers can be drastic. If you buy a humbucker and don't like it that can be an expensive waste. Also sometimes certain brands of pickups don't mesh so well together. If you have access to a lot of pickups and you know how to solder then it makes sense to experiment a bit. It can also be cool to have two pickguards each having different pickups in them. What kind of sound are you looking for? Gibson-style PAFs are much different than a Duncan Hot Rail which is quite different from say a Bill Lawrence L-500, also you could go with EMGs. Also you will have to figure out for yourself if you like a neck humbucker or not, what works for one person doesn't work for another - and within that, you might like one particular humbucker in the neck spot but not others.

Wanting a humbucker sound doesn't necessarily mean you would like a Les Paul more than a Strat either. I used to build guitars for a boutique guitar company, they built me a guitar and they let me experiment with all of their materials and electronics. Once you want a particular sound it can be tricky getting it perfect. For the most part any setup you can think of is cool for some things, but it might not nail the exact sound you want.

Separate from different pickup types and configurations it is worth trying out different wiring schemes. It can be nice to get the bridge and neck pickups on a strat together - especially when there is a humbucker on the bridge. A middle humbucker can also be cool. I never really liked coil-tapping or phase-switching, but some people do. You can also get into individual volumes for each pickup, tone control or no tone control, master tone or individual tones. On/off switches for all three pickups is a fun way to go. Anything you can think of can usually be wired up.

If you have to buy pickups try finding a guitar in a store with the pickup installed and try it before buying. It can suck buying a $100 pickup that doesn't quite work out.

Lots of people have ripping sounds with humbuckers on Strats. Rivers from Weezer used to have a Strat modded with two Humbuckers and it sounded killer.

Lives for gear

 
ksandvik's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tinderwet➡️

Don't tell that to Elliott Randall.

Well, if I have a Strat I would like to keep the Strat sound, but the bridge pickups might as well be HH. Note there are double-stacked HH Strat pickups so you don't need to do a surgery to insert a HH into the bridge pickup position.

Quote:

Originally Posted by nedorama➡️

JB Jr. in the back. I'll probably swap out the JB Jr. for something else as I have 2 teles with humbuckers front and rear.

Hi,is a JB Jr. a mini humbucker?,and why are you going to swap it out?

I have noticed,since getting a LP,which has a 498[bridge, 490 neck],that Gibson call it,well the JB,seems to have much nicer highs,than the 498,almost like the 498 is overwound or something?
RK

JB Jr is a mini humbucker in a strat shape patterned after their full-size JB hum bucker.

I have the regular JB in my Tele; in my other tele I have a Hot Rails Strat neck and a Hot Rails Tele bridge. Looking for a different sound in the strat bridge.

And what I found is that while the JB Jr. is good, it's not a substitute for the full-size JB.

Quote:

This is the kind of thing I'm after. A nice twang that's characteristic of the strat with the versatility of having the chunky humbucker sound. I'm wanting to turn it from a great guitar to a great all round recording and versatile guitar.

This is why I like hybrids. Plus the feel of a Strat (scale length, etc.) is quite a bit different than a Les Paul.

The formula on my current main guitar is: One-piece mahogany body, bolt-on maple neck w/ebony 'board, tilt-back headstock, string-thru hardtail bridge, 25.5"-inch scale length, Carvin Holdsworth bridge pup, AP11 neck pup, 3-way LP-style toggle pup selector with 3 push/pull switch-loaded (coil tap, phase, series/parallel) pots configured as bridge vol, neck vol, master tone. It's really a Fender/Gibson tone mash-up in the best possible way.

BTW the body shape is actually an Ovation Breadwinner (w/matching headstock).

Quote:

Originally Posted by jampot➡️

It was Elliott that made me think about it really! Seeing him play his strat a couple of times is quite an experience when it sounds as gorgeous as it does!

He's such a pro. Plays those endless soaring lines so nonchalantly. I also dig the no hassle strat and that he actually likes the original trebly bridge pickup. lol

Lives for gear

 
Kronos147's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by nedorama➡️

JB Jr is a mini humbucker in a strat shape patterned after their full-size JB hum bucker.

I have one of those in one of my Strats, bridge position. It is kind of new to me. I think I like it, but not 100% sold yet.

Lives for gear

 
the donal's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Do you know which wood the body is made from? This can make a big difference to the choice of pickup too.

I have a Jap HRR Strat with a basswood body that is super lively. It has a Super 3 in the bridge (stock) and a Duncan 59 in the neck position. Sounds amazing. The Super 3 has lots of mid to complement the top end of the wood. The 59 that I had put in complements it perfectly.

If you have alder, it may be mellower than basswood, so you may want a bridge pickup with a little more top and power (my alder Strat Plus doesn't have half the tonal energy or volume as the HRR).

Maybe if you know a good repair shop nearby, take it to them and seek some suggestions.

Gear Nut

Quote:

Originally Posted by nedorama➡️

JB Jr is a mini humbucker in a strat shape patterned after their full-size JB hum bucker.

I have the regular JB in my Tele; in my other tele I have a Hot Rails Strat neck and a Hot Rails Tele bridge. Looking for a different sound in the strat bridge.

And what I found is that while the JB Jr. is good, it's not a substitute for the full-size JB.

Totally agree, the JB jr. is cool but really not as full or aggressive as the full size JB. So depending on what you want the jr. might work better if you don't want to sound to humbucker-ish.

Gear Nut

Quote:

Originally Posted by jampot➡️

Hi Guys,

As much as we all love buying guitars, there's always that money issue, and am thinking about making my Strat as versatile as possible and am looking into changing the pick-ups, including adding a humbucker.

It's a Mex and sounds pretty nice, wanting to get a pair of DiMarzio area 61 for middle and bridge, as they're 'silent' and then adding a Super Distortion to the bridge, so I can have the single coil sound with the switch in neck position, and the chunky tone on the bridge switch.

Question is, is it worth it? I'm LH so choice of electrics is sparse enough as it is. How possible/pain staking/potentially expensive is a pick-up change inc. humbucker (barring the fact I'll need a new scratchp plate!)

Thanks,

Jampot
What kind of sound are you looking for?

Lives for gear

 
MoBeach's Avatar

Gear Addict

before you buy a full size humbucker take a look at the Super Distortion S. Dimarzio made a single coil sized rail humbucker Super Distortion which also allows you to split the coil when you want the "single-coil" sound. You can go on youtube and look at vids of guys with it to see if the tone is up to your standards. I myself just purchased the Dimarzio Injector bridge because I wanted a P90ish fat single coil tone without the hum. I'm getting it installed later this week.

Here for the gear

Quote:

Originally Posted by vintagelove➡️

Always liked SSH on a strat.

^ yeah that

Little '59


Not sure if this has been mentioned, but what the hell.

I did something similar w/ a tele. Duncan makes a pup called a little '59 that fits into a single coil routed body. Somebody initially said it would sound like a Les Paul, and the pickup was designed to sound like 59 LP pup or something.

It is maybe similar, but I have a couple LP's, and have recorded them side by side thousands of times, and while similar, there are obviously more than subtle differences. Mainly due to the body material and bridge design.

It's a pretty hot pup, with decent sustain, and if it weren't for the metal plate thing on the tele bridge, would be capable of high gain metal etc. Problem is on a Tele, is that the plate resonates and rings with super high gain settings. You could probably dampen this somehow, but then it would take away what makes a Tele sound like a tele for every other style I play.

I think in a Strat, this would be ideal, as you wouldn't need to rout the body out.


One thing though. After I did this, I liked it and all ( a LOT actually, still probably my most played gtr, as it can cover most anything), great hard rock tones etc.

That said, I later got on to a Led Zeppelin style kick, and wanted to try and get the tone from LZ 1. Freaking LOVE THAT SOUND. Clearly this was the sound of that single coil in the bridge though, and there is really no other way to get that.In the end I ended up getting another tele for traditional tones, and keeping the modded one because of it's versatility. Had to, as now my modded tele couldn't do this.

I guess what I am saying is, that if you do this, you will gain the humbucker thing, but lose some really cool tones that can only be had w/ a single coil in the bridge position on a strat. Hendrix, Johnson, Trower, Clapton, Blackmore...the list is endless.

If it were me though, I'd do it because if you have only one or two guitars, it will make your strat way more versatile for the short term. I'd put the lil 59 in, and later grab another strat and leave it stock for when you need that.

Here is the link to the aforementioned pup, good luck:
Little '59™ for Tele ST59-1b - Seymour Duncan High Output

john

PS others to check out before routing out the body, are Joe Bardens.

One of the primary distinctions (relative to tone) between double-coil pickups and single-coils is the pole piece. Singles have one row (or blade) that creates a single pick-up point. A double-coil pickup has two rows which slightly cancel each other's signal because of the distance between them. This result is a less sharp, more rounded off frequency response. So a 'bucker that fits two coils rows into a single-coil frame size will sound a bit brighter and peakier than a full-sized double-coil pickup, since the coils are closer together.

Sours: https://gearspace.com/board/

Humbucker strat neck

How To Mix Single Coils and Humbuckers

Mixing Single Coil pickups and Humbuckers present a wide array of challenges to the average guitarist. HSS Strats, Telecasters, and other mixed-pickup guitars all have this problem, and most of the time, it goes overlooked by the guitarist. We get a lot of calls and spend a lot of time talking through this issue – there’s no one real solution – but many solutions that might fit your needs. Let’s talk some basics first:

Think of Single Coil Pickups (Vintage Hot or Stock Telecaster) and Humbuckers (Pure P.A.F. or Standard) as two different animals when it comes to tone and output. A single coil is usually 8-9,000 turns of wire on a single bobbin, whereas humbuckers are two single coils wired in series – a lot more output and a completely different and darker tone. Check out this reference:

Single Coils:

  • Are usually brighter than humbuckers in tone
  • Usually need 250K Volume Pots due to their brightness
  • Are a lot less output than humbuckers

Humbuckers:

  • A lot darker than single coil pickups
  • Usually need 500K Pots
  • More powerful than single coils

Confused on Pot Values? Check out our Volume and Tone Pots 101 Post.

Mixing these two in a guitar with a single master volume pot usually means you need to sacrifice something. Do you use a 500K volume pot for your bridge humbucker and have brighter-sounding single coils, or vice versa?

Know Yourself:

Ask yourself: what position do I play the most? Do I love the sound of the Strat neck Pickup and only occasionally use the bridge? Or, do I rock out with the bridge humbucker a lot and rarely play the single coils? Knowing the answer to this question will help you choose the right wind of pickups, and solution that might work best for you. Let’s walk through a few different scenarios and solutions to see which one might fit!


Solution #1: Choose the correct Pickup Wind & Tone.

This is our most recommended solution. Choose the most compatible pickup outputs and tone. 

If you have a guitar with mixed pickups, spending time choosing pickups that work well together in the first place is our most recommended solution. This may involve using a brighter-sounding or lower-output humbucker to match with your single coils, or getting darker and more powerful single coils to keep up with your humbucker.

A few examples of this might include using Blues Specials or High Output Single Coils with a Pure P.A.F. bridge. Or, get darker-sounding single-coils (Steel Pole 42 / Steel Pole 43, High Output) to compensate, and use a 500K pot on the whole guitar.

You can also use pickups that are voiced similar, but with different designs. For instance, check out our Sunbucker,Big Single (42 Gauge) and Twangmaster – all are humbucker sized pickups that are bright and snappy, and use 250K pots.

Split Blades Give you a lot of options here. For instance, Blues and Super High Output Split Blades sound best with 500K pots, making them perfect for HSS guitars and Telecasters. You can use a 500K Pot on the whole guitar, and your pickups won’t be too overly bright.

Solution #2: Use a 300K Volume Pot.

When a 250K and 500K won’t cut it, a 300K pot might do the trick. It’s brighter-sounding than a 250K, and darker-sounding than a 500K pot. You could replace your volume pot with a 300K pot, and you might find that your pickups meet in the middle. If you have a 300K pot and a humbucker in the Bridge, you’ll notice your humbucker won’t be as dark, but your single coils will get brighter as a result.

Solution #3: Use our “Bright Switch” Push Pull Mod.

Imagine you had a Telecaster with a Neck humbucker and a Bridge Telecaster bridge pickup. The neck position is already dark as it us, and with a humbucker in there, it’s extra dark. Your guitar has a 250K volume pot, and your bridge pickup sounds awesome. Using our Bright Switch mod will help remove the 250K load on the neck, and brighten it up. Click the link to hear this in a Strat.

Fralin Pickups Bright Switch

Solution #4: Use a Resistor.

Using a resistor in parallel with your pickup can make a pickup “see” a different value pot than there actually is. Let’s imagine this scenario: You have a Telecaster with a P90 in the neck and a Single Coil bridge. You can use a 500K pot for a master volume, and run a ~470K resistor off the switch from your bridge position and running it to ground. The P90 in the neck will see the 500K volume pot as normal, and the bridge will see a 242K pot (close enough to 250K for us).

There are trade-offs to this solution. As soon as you click into position #2 (Neck and Bridge), the combined resistance will yield a very dark-sounding middle position.


There are other solutions as well, all with trade-offs. You might want to consider using a 250K / 500K Concentric Volume Pot, but you’ll be left with 2 knobs to turn – one for each value. You might also consider sacrificing a tone pot and use two volume pots. There are a lot of ways to get around this problem, and it’s worth taking the time to figure out which pickup combinations will work best with each other and take your guitar to the next level.

Sours: https://www.fralinpickups.com/2017/10/23/mix-single-coils-humbuckers/
Hot Rails For Strat Single Coil Sized Humbucker

10 best Stratocaster neck pickups to buy in 2019

If you’ve delved into our primer on the ins and outs of Stratocaster pickups, now is the time to mix and match your new single coil set with our handy guide on the ten best Stratocaster neck pickups. Best start practicing your SRV shuffle.

House Of Tone House Special S Type 1960

The House Special S Type 1960 (HSST 60) set was conceived as an ‘idealised’ 1960 Strat tone, based on readings taken from several genuine examples. Components include 42 AWG heavy formvar wire and hand-bevelled alnico V magnets. We haven’t heard any set that nails the pre-CBS slab ‘board sound better than these.

Retails for£155 (set). Read our full review here.

Monty’s Guitars Full Monty Strat Pickup

The brains behind Monty’s Guitars claim their Full Monty pickup aims to take your humble Stratocaster or S-type and “feed it some wholesome tonal pies and fatten it up.” A tonally versatile pickup, the full monty neck can easily range from modern pop jangle to classic rock growl, all with the sweep of your volume pot. With the volume wide open it leans into P-90 territory, whilst position two and four on your switch retain that all-important Strat ‘quack’. And for those of you that are concerned about vintage correct accuracy, it also features vintage-correct cloth pushback wire and forbon flatwork.

Retails for £80. Read our interview with Monty’s Guitars here.

Fender Tex-Mex Strat Pickups

Previously seen on the great Jimmie Vaughan’s signature Stratocaster, the Fender Tex-Mex pups are now available in a standalone package. Offering a higher output and sparkling highs, these pickups can offer that traditionally chimey Stratocaster tone on a wallet-friendly budget. While they’re not going to compete with something from Fender’s Custom Shop range or a more high-end boutique offering, this versatile set will get you much closer to your desired Strat tone, and the middle pickup’s reverse polarity to eliminate that all-too-familiar hum is a nice touch, too.

Retails for£115 (set).

Seymour Duncan Antiquity Texas Hot Neck

Don’t let the photo above fool you, these are in fact modern pickups, painstakingly aged by the Seymour Duncan team. The Antiquity Texas Hot Neck from the Santa Barbara-based company is reminiscent of the pickups made by their Californian neighbours way back in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Claiming it possesses a tonal character commonly associated with a decades-old pickup, created using vintage, cloth push-back lead wire, custom aged cover and aged mounting hardware. Each is lacquered and potted in lamp black paraffin wax, like the originals. Hand made by their custom shop team, the Texas Hot one of the closest iterations of a true ’50s Strat you’ll find on the market.

Retails for$95.

Radioshop ID:Chris Buck Signature Strat Single

South Wales guitarist Chris Buck is one of the emergent standard bearers for the Mayall/Clapton/Slash school of blues and rock guitar playing. His new partnership with Radioshop has breeded some great new pickups, which are also available as a set and even as a preloaded harness. What’s immediately apparent is the richness of tone and the evenness of output across all the switch positions. Also the pole-piece stagger makes for a very even response across the strings.

Retails for£73. Read our full review here.

Bare Knuckle Pickups PAT Pend ’63 Veneer Board Neck

This set is based on the best examples of the Strat pickups Fender was making when the fingerboards changed from slab to veneer. The slugs became slightly narrower in diameter and the extra space on the bobbin allowed the coils to be wound a little hotter, to add beef to balance the narrow slug’s extra brightness. These are scatter-wound by hand, with heavy formvar.

Retails for£75.

Klein 1969 Epic Series Stratocaster Pickups

Classic Strat tone can mean late-60s as well as pre-CBS, especially if you like Clapton, Gilmour and Hendrix. This set features grey baseplates, alnico V slugs and ‘flash-potted’ 42 AWG plain enamel wire. Right-handed Hendrix fans can order left-handed pickups at no extra charge for the reversed stagger.

Retails for $90.

Fender Pure Vintage ’65 Strat pickups

Featuring vintage bobbin construction and original-era cloth wiring, Fender’s Pure Vintage ’65 Stratocaster pickups are wound to clear-cut specifications for the authentic tone and performance associated with traditional Fender models of yesteryear. With an enamel coated magnet for vintage warmth, plus staggered pole-pieces for accurate and balanced volume, these vintage-inspired pups from Fender are one of the best vintage replicas available today.

Retails for£179.

Lindy Fralin Vintage Hot

The Vintage Hot is Lindy Fralin’s bestselling Strat-style pickup, and with good reason. This pickup has been a go-to option for Stratocaster aficionados for the better part of three decades, and its name suggests exactly why. Possessing the most vintage sound that Fralin has to offer, both open and airy with lots of sparkle on top alongside well-balanced lows, these pickups are difficult to contend with. Fralin recommends you buy this offering as a full set in order to avoid pickup polarity issues.

Retails for$95.

EMG SA

If it’s good enough for Gilmour, it’s good enough for you. The EMG SA is not your traditional S-type pickup, nor is it trying to be. Strat pickups are known for their noise issues, especially when recording, but EMG’s SA variation is here to save your backside with their hum-canceling pickup, thanks to internal shielding and a low impedance preamp, giving you a virtually noiseless pickup without sacrificing that alnico V tone. It also comes in a variety of colour palettes, so not only will your Strat sound cool, it’ll look the part, too.

Retails for$95.

Click here for more buyer’s guides.

Sours: https://guitar.com/guides/best-stratocaster-neck-pickups/

You will also be interested:

Three guys aged 19-20 came out of it. They had a nephew with them. Together they entered the courtyard of our dacha. My wife and I had breakfast on the veranda.



2994 2995 2996 2997 2998