Kdx 200 jetting

Kdx 200 jetting DEFAULT

Suspension Tips

Suspension is one of the more difficult components to recommend, because so many variables exist. Which is why I ask that you please keep in mind that the following recommendations should be used as a guideline only. Individual rider ability and the type of terrain could move you up or down a spring rate if your weight is on the border of any of these specified weight ranges.

Forks

1989-1992 "E" Models: I have found that the stock forks work pretty well for most riders less than 140 lbs. For riders that weigh between 140-170 lbs, I recommend replacing the stock springs with a .33 kg spring. For riders weighting between 170-210 lbs, a .35 kg spring works well, and a .38 kg spring works for riders weighing over 210 lbs. I recommend setting the clickers between 6-12 clicks out for each of these weight categories.

1993-1994 "E" Models: I recommend replacing the stock springs with a .38 kg spring for all riders weighing 150-200 lbs, and .40 kg spring for all riders weighing 200 lbs and up. Clickers for all weights should be set between 6-10 clicks out.

1995-2006 "H" Models: I have found that the stock forks work fairly well for most riders that weigh less than 140 lbs. I recommend replacing the stock springs with a .38 kg spring for riders that weigh between 140-190 lbs. For riders weighting between 190-220 lbs a .40 kg spring works well, and .42 kg springs work for riders weighing 200-250 lbs. For riders over 250 lbs, or if you are not sure of the spring that is right for you, please contact us. For each of these weight categories I recommend setting the clickers between 8-14 clicks out.

By following these recommendations I am confident that you will notice significantly improved performance from your forks. For 1993-2002 models only: You can improve the performance of your forks even more by sending them to us, so we can replace the stock valves with Race Tech Gold valves.

Shocks

1989-1994 "E" Models: The stock spring seems to work well for riders between 150-200 lbs. For riders weighing over 200 lbs, I would recommend replacing the stock spring with a 4.8 kg spring and set the sag at 3.75-4".

The type of terrain you are riding will determine the correct compression and rebound settings. I recommend setting the compression adjuster (located at the top of shock) at about 6 clicks out for faster terrain and 12 clicks out for the slower, more technical terrain. The rebound adjuster (located at the bottom of the shock) should be set from 8 clicks out for faster terrain up to 14 clicks for the more technical stuff.

1995-2006 "H" Models: The stock spring seems to work well for riders that weigh between 180-210 lbs. I recommend replacing the stock spring with a 4.6 kg spring for riders weighing less than 150 lbs, a 4.8 kg spring for riders weighing between 150-180 lbs, a 5.2 kg spring for riders weighing 210-240 lbs, and a 5.4 kg spring for rider more than 240 lbs.

The type of terrain you are riding will determine the correct compression and rebound settings. I recommend setting both the compression adjuster (located at the top of the shock) and the rebound adjuster (located at the bottom of the shock) at about 8 clicks out for faster terrain. For slower, more technical terrain I recommend setting both the compression and rebound settings at about 12 clicks out.

By following these recommendations, I am confident that you will notice significantly improved performance from your shock. If you're looking for maximum shock performance, however, I would strongly recommend that you send us your shock so we can re-valve it. I would also recommend that you let us service your shock every 800-1000 miles, to prevent premature failure.

Sours: https://www.frpoffroad.com/kdxposed

KDX Jetting

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Bill Gearhart

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Apr 29, 1998, 10:00:00 AM4/29/98

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I just bought a 1992 KDX200, it has less then 500 miles and is great
shape. When riding
it feels likes it's loading up real bad and doesn't want to fully rev
out, I was told it has stock jetting, how can I tell, is there a number
on the jet indicating what size it is. I don't have
alot of experience with 2 strokes. Do you think the local Kawasaki shop
will be abel to get it right? Any help will be greatly appreaciated.

Regards
Bill Gearhart

dirtr...@aol.com's profile photo

[email protected]

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Apr 29, 1998, 10:00:00 AM4/29/98

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>---=== Posted via: Off-Road.com * http://www.off-road.com===---<

Contact Jeff Fredette Racing. His number is in the back of dirt rider.
He'll send you a list of good upgrades, what the stock jetting is and
what you should change it to. You can take the jets out of the carb
yourself and there are numbers on them. You could write those numbers
down and a guy and the kawi shop should be able to tell you what the
correct ones are.

Sounds like maybe more like a clogged jet than the wrong one.
If the bikes only got 500 miles, how long has it been laying around
with the old gas in it ?

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MX Tuner

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Apr 29, 1998, 10:00:00 AM4/29/98

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>I just bought a 1992 KDX200, it has less then 500 miles and is great
>shape. When riding
>it feels likes it's loading up real bad and doesn't want to fully rev
>out, I was told it has stock jetting, how can I tell, is there a number
>on the jet indicating what size it is. I don't have
>alot of experience with 2 strokes.

The power valves need to have their entire mechanism cleaned
periodically. I just did the top end on one which had "just" been
cleaned. The guy scraped a little carbon off the port side of the
valves. The teeth were broken off one of the valves. He had the same
complaint as you. It wouldn't rev out.

>Do you think the local Kawasaki shop
>will be abel to get it right?

That's debatable.

MX Tuner

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Perry Meade

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Apr 30, 1998, 10:00:00 AM4/30/98

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to Bill Gearhart


Bill,

Congrats on your new toy. I have been riding a KDX200 for several years
now. Best bike I ever had!

When I bought my bike, I noticed it to be a bit sluggish when
approaching max RPM. Since the guy I bought it from had owned it three
years and didn't do a top end, I decided to open it up just to take a
peek. Turns out the power valve had snapped off and was just sitting
there. I bought a new one from Kawasaki and put in a Wiseco piston and
ring kit. The bike has run like a champ ever since!

If your expansion chamber, silencer, and reed valves are all stock, you
SHOULD run the stock carb settings.

If you are hell-bent on making carb mods, here is a blurb I snipped from
this newsgroup some time ago:
=======================================================================
I just made the same changes to my 1992 KDX 200 and I am very pleased
with the new performance. I Used the following jetting as recommended by
Fredette Racing:Remove the airbox lid, 158 main jet, 48 pilot, and 1173
needle in middle position, air screw 1/2 to 1 turn out. This jetting was
spot on for me here at sea level and should work for you also. You might
want to call Fredette Racing Products at 708-946-0999 for a tip sheet,
they are very knowledgeable and a good source of KDX parts.
=======================================================================

If you follow this recommendation and remove your airbox lid (to
increase air flow) it is a good idea to put a section of filter foam
(available at bike shops) on the top of your airbox to keep the really
nasty stuff away from your filter.

Also, since you are in the Bay area (Pacbell.net was a dead give-away)
you are lucky enough to be in "Zoom" country. Dan Dunning (owner of
Zoom Cycles in Santa Clara) is a KDX200 rider from way back. If you
need any tweaking recommendations he is the man! Zoom is located at
3413 El Camino in Santa Clara, just south of Lawrence Expressway. Their
Phone # is (408)248-5780.

Take care,

Perry Meade
[email protected]

Bill Gearhart wrote:
>
> I just bought a 1992 KDX200, it has less then 500 miles and is great
> shape. When riding
> it feels likes it's loading up real bad and doesn't want to fully rev
> out, I was told it has stock jetting, how can I tell, is there a number
> on the jet indicating what size it is. I don't have

> alot of experience with 2 strokes. Do you think the local Kawasaki shop

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KDX Kawboy

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May 3, 1998, 10:00:00 AM5/3/98

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My experience with 3 KDX 200s says worry about the power valve before getting
involved in the jetting. Unless you are riding at high altitudes - over 6000
ft - the stock jetting wont cause the problem you describe.

Busted/ummed up/Un-Maintained power valves will. The power valve opens as the
rpms increase to give the engine more radical porting and more power. As the
rpms drop the power valve closes to improve the egines low end. If the power
valve don't work right it is like you are riding an engine that will not rev
out because the porting is to mild. Stock jetting makes life worse cause it
was designed to work with the power valve. If the power valve don;t open the
jetting will be to rich.
Patric Schmid, [email protected]

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Jetting Guide

Postby Indawoods »

A correctly jetted carb makes a tremendous difference in the torque, midrange pull, top-end pull, and over-rev of your engine. If you have never jetted your bike correctly, you will almost certainly gain some performance at some point in the bike's powerband. A cleanly jetted pilot circuit can be the difference between having to clutch the bike out of a turn or not. The needle can make all the difference in the world for the power of the machine in most situations, as it controls the throttle range that most riders spend most of their time using. A correctly sized main jet could mean the difference between being able to rev out high enough to not have to shift one more time at the end of the straight, or the power falling flat on top and requiring you to make that extra shift.

Are you fouling plugs? Many people will tell you all sorts of band-aid fixes, from running less oil, to running a hotter plug. Both are incorrect fixes for plug fouling. It's all in the jetting.

A correctly jetted carb makes a tremendous difference in the torque, midrange pull, top-end pull, and over-rev of your engine. If you have never jetted your bike correctly, you will almost certainly gain some performance at some point in the bike's powerband. A cleanly jetted pilot circuit can be the difference between having to clutch the bike out of a turn or not. The needle can make all the difference in the world for the power of the machine in most situations, as it controls the throttle range that most riders spend most of their time using. A correctly sized main jet could mean the difference between being able to rev out high enough to not have to shift one more time at the end of the straight, or the power falling flat on top and requiring you to make that extra shift.


The only way to know what jetting changes you will need is by trial-and-error. No one can give you jetting specs, because every bike is different, every rider has a different style, and jetting is totally weather dependent. Unless the person telling you what jets to use is riding an identical bike, on the exact same track, at the same time, his recommendations are meaningless.

Jetting is fairly simple, and is a useful skill to learn if you ride a two-stroke and want it to perform at it's best. It's very important that you start with the pilot circuit. The reason is simple. The pilot circuit affects the entire throttle range. When you are at full throttle, the main jet is the primary fuel metering device, but the pilot is still delivering fuel as well, adding to the total amount of fuel that your engine is receiving.

Before you start to rejet your bike, you need a clean air filter, a fresh plug (actually you need several plugs to do plug-chop tests for the main jet), and fresh fuel. One important detail: Make sure the engine is in good mechanical condition. If your engine has a worn top-end, fix it first. Trying to jet a worn out engine is a waste of time. The same goes for reeds that don't seal properly, and a silencer that needs re-packing. Worn reeds will mimic rich jetting, and worn rings will mimic lean jetting. Before you start the jet testing, install a fresh plug. Set the float level to the proper specs, an incorrect float height will affect your jetting all across the throttle range. Warm the bike completely, and shut it off.

As already stated, start with the pilot circuit. Turn the airscrew all the way in, then turn it out 1.5 turns to start. Start the engine, and turn the idle screw in until you get a slightly fast idle, or hold the throttle just barely cracked, to keep the engine idleing. Turn the airscrew slowly in, and then out, until you find the point where the idle is fastest. Stop there. Do not open the screw any farther, or your throttle response will be flat and mushy, and the bike may even bog. This is only the starting point, we will still have to tune the airscrew for the best response.

Now is the time to determine if you have the correct pilot installed in your carb. The airscrew position determines this for you, making it very simple. If your airscrew is less than 1 turn from closed, you need a larger pilot jet. If it is more than 2.5 turns from closed, you need a smaller pilot jet. Once you have determined (and installed it if it's necessary to change it) the correct pilot jet size, and tuned the airscrew for the fastest idle, it's time to tune the airscrew for the best throttle response. Again, make sure the bike is at full operating temperature. Set the idle back down (the bike should still idle, despite what you read in the Moto Tabloids), and ride the bike, using closed-to-1/4 throttle transitions. Turn the airscrew slightly in either direction until you find the point that gives you the best response when cracking the throttle open. Most bikes are sensitive to changes as small as 1/8 of a turn. The airscrew is not a set-it-and-leave-it adjustment. You have to constantly re-adjust the airscrew to compensate for changing outdoor temps and humidity. An airscrew setting that is perfect in the cool morning air will likely be too rich in the heat of the mid-day.

Now, it's time to work on the needle. Mark the throttle grip at 1/4 and 3/4 openings. Ride the bike between these two marks. If the bike bogs for a second before responding to throttle, lower the clip (raising the needle) a notch at a time until the engine picks up smoothly. If the bike sputters or sounds rough when giving it throttle, raise the clip (lowering the needle) until it runs cleanly. There isn't really any way to test the needle other than by feel, but it's usually quite obvious when it's right or wrong.

Last is the main jet. The main jet affects from 1/2 to full throttle. The easiest way to test it is to do a throttle-chop test. With the bike fully warmed up, find a long straight, and install a fresh plug. Start the engine, and do a full-throttle run down the straight, through all gears. As soon as the bike tops out, pull the clutch in, and kill the engine, coasting to a stop. Remove the plug, and look deep down inside the threads, at the base of the insulator. If it is white or gray, the main is too lean. If it is dark brown or black, the main is too rich. The correct color is a medium-dark mocha brown or tan.

Once you have a little bit of experience with jetting changes, and you start to learn the difference in feel between "rich" and "lean", you'll begin to learn, just from the sound of the exhaust and the feel of the power, not only if the bike is running rich or lean, but even which one of the carb circuits is the culprit. The slide is also a tuning variable for jetting, but slides are very expensive, and few bikes need different slides, so we won't go into that here.

*** Administrator //***
****'95 KDX 200/****

"People ate cows a thousand years ago for the same reason we eat them now. Cause they are easy to catch.We're not savages,we're just lazy. A cheetah could taste like chocolate heroin. But will never know. Those bastards are fast!!! "

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Air filter spray \u0026 install - Kawasaki Kdx 200

KDX rejetting - Where to go?

Greg said:

I heard you say you don't have the time, but I think you should do a bit of research and DIY just to learn more about how the bike works. Talk to the South Valley about the proper jetting for the elevation you ride the most, they could probably recommend the right jetting and probably have the parts.

I had to rejet my bike this Summer and also did some performance mods while I was in there. It didn't take that long and the learning experience was invaluable. The bike also ran much better!

Click to expand...


Was that your first attempt at rejetting? I'll give South Valley a call and see if I can get the right parts for this altitude.

Rot Box said:

I spent half my life on a 97 KDX200 :greg: Awesome bikes to say the least!

Click to expand...


No kidding! I did a lot of reading before picking up this bike. I wanted a simple, reliable, woods bike. I have been extremely happy with the rides that I have had it out on.

Rot Box said:

Also what two stroke oil do you run? Having owned several Kawasaki's I will say the KIPS power valves are very temperamental when it comes to the type of oil being ran. These years KX/KDX are known for fauling out plugs if you use poor 2 cycle oil. Also remember that oil mix ratio has NOTHING to do with jetting. Most confuse this and assume more oil will make you foul out easier. That is not the case unless you put an excessive amount of oil in your fuel. I always ran mine at 36:1 and had great results.

Click to expand...


I have been running Klotz 80/20 at 40:1. My FIL is convinced that is why they've been fouling. He's says I just need to switch to full synthetic at 50:1. Everything that I read before I bought the bike indicated this was not correct. I get a lot of spooge as well. I think that's what it's called :confused:After a day of running, the exhaust is practically dripping with oil, and it sprays the underside of the bike.

Rot Box said:

I have seen too many people pay too much money for someone to jet there bike and have it be way off of where it should be.

Click to expand...


That's really what I'm afraid of :-\ There is an aftermarket pipe on it and some holes cut in the airbox, will this affect which jets and needle I should use?

DeadEye J said:

Remember, "The doer alone learneth."

Click to expand...


:guilty: I keep meaning to change that... Seems like I haven't had time to do hands on anything lately :-\

Thanks for all of your inspiration, guys. Looks like I've been able to free up quite a bit of time next Saturday, so I'll give it a shot. Found plenty of reading here.

 

Sours: https://www.rme4x4.com/threads/kdx-rejetting-where-to-go.69325/

Jetting kdx 200

DefaultJetting Issue? My kdx 200 just won't stop knockin' . . .

Late this summer I picked up a 2002 kdx 200 and it's been a great little bike for trail riding I do around Gunnison. It's giving me fits, though, in terms of jetting. When I'm cruising in the top gears at 1/4-1/2 throttle (usually on logging or fire roads), the engine really knocks (sounds like the piston is hitting the top of the cylinder). When I get on the gas hard the knocking lessens or goes away. I've fattened the main a great deal, to the point where it's blubbery just about everywhere, but the knocking on the top end won't go away. I'm usually riding bettween 9,000 and 12,000 feet of elevation, but I'm jetted richer than you would for sea level . I've tested the thing for air leaks, et cetera, on the intake, but haven't been able to find anything. Anyone experienced or dealt with a simillar kdx problem before? Thanks . . . ! :yum

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2 Stroke Jetting Basics! How to properly Jet your 2 Stroke Carburetor

Kawasaki KDX200

SOLD!!!

As noted above, I sold the WR250 in the spring of 2000. I sat bikeless for a year, sold all my gear, and just couldn't stand it. I started thinking about trying to get another bike to use on the ranch and for just general riding, with less "fast" riding like I'd done with the WR. The Kawasaki KLX300 and KDX200 looked promising, providing I could find used ones. I sure liked the light weight and flickability of the 2-stroke and leaned hard toward the KDX, especially after finding the great JustKDX site and reading about the reliability of KDX's. Just as with the WR, one day I was on-line and it occured to me to check the Amarillo classifieds. I did and there were 2 KDX200 for sale! A '97 for $3000 and a "'95" with no price. I called about the '95 and was told it was really a '96 and they'd take $1900 for it. It sounded great- used as a ranch/farm bike and play rode on the Red River. No racing, all original. This, time, though I bought from a Christian perspective and did some praying about it first. When the weekend came around, the bike was still available, I'd consulted with my wife and Christian brothers, and decided to check it out. We met 1/2 way and I came home with my first Kawasaki!

Compare to the similar shot of the XR200 above! SAME BOOTS!!! (I actually have had new ones- Fox Forma- but, like an idiot, sold them). The boots are an interesting story....after getting my Fox Formas (which I stupidly sold...) I put the HiPoints in a box and put them in the garage. My mother had a garage sale the same weekend I bought the KDX and the day after, I was sitting there wondering what to do for boots since I'd stupidly sol...anyway, I remembed my trusty HiPoints! So I called and she had given them to some people who then give things to a ministry. I got on the phone and la-da! got my boots back! They actually were kind enough to retrieve the box from a dumpster for me! I'm looking for some new used boots on Ebay, but in the meantime, these work better than nothing.

The KDX had stock jetting and was RICH, RICH, RICH. I can't believe they rode it that rich! The first thing I did was drop the stock 160 to a 155 main jet and the stock 48 pilot to a 42 as per the recommendations on JustKDX. I think I can go even leaner, but will wait to experiment until I have cleaned the KIPS valve. Right now (Sept 2001) the bike runs good, but still a little rich.  (December 2001: I found out that B7ES instead of B8ES plug works a lot better, too). I'm very impressed with the handling and the suspension. Places that used to kick the rear of both the XR and WR don't bother the KDX at all. The power is exactly in between the XR and WR, with plenty of low end grunt and still with the quick revving 2-stroke engine. It turns well, stops well, and runs very smooth down the dirt roads on the ranch. It tracks straight thru the mud and doesn't wheelspin like the WR did, nor push the front tire like the XR. Wheelies are very controllable and I can lift the front end easily with just a little clutch work. I really like it. During the winter I'll check the top-end, including the KIPS valve, put Answer Alumilite bars on with handguards, radiator guards, and probably a rear brake shark fin. I do't want to spend too much money, just looking to increase reliability and crash protection.

It sure feels good to be riding again!

November 2001:

I now have, thanks to a fellow "KDX'er for Christ", a slighly used FMF K-35 exhaust and ISDE silencer, and thanks to Ebay, a set of Devol radiator guards, and thanks to Rocky Mountain MC a Utah Sport Cycles skid plate.  Happy with all!  The pipe gives the bike a smoother quicker rev with definitely more mid-range hit.  It doesn't turn it into a KX250 (that's a good thing), but does make it a little peppier and quite a bit quicker off of idle.  I delayed putting the ISDE silencer on because I was afraid it would be too loud, but when I did, I was very pleasantly surprised to find it was quieter than stock!  And I really felt a bit more torque and high end rev, too.  A great combination- THANKS BOB!!! The radiator guards were a snap to put on and I feel a lot more secure with them in place.  The skid plate- well, every now and then I hear it go "twwiiinnnggg" off a rock, and I'm glad it's there!  I also have MSR Dominator aluminum bars on, but I'm not sure I'd recommend them as they're a little flexy.   I have Maier handguards on now and they'll show up in more recent pictures.

KDX_left.JPG (70585 bytes)KDX_right.JPG (72354 bytes)

KDX_skid.JPG (50110 bytes)


2005 update!

This is what my KDX looked like in December 2005.  I'm running a vented UFO plate on the front to replace the stock headlight that I busted at Berthoud.  I've also got Pro Taper SE Charmichael bars.  Bike has an FMF Desert pipe now instead of the Torque pipe. Gripper seat.  '01 KDX200 graphics.  I can live with the purple tank although someday I'm going to get a "natural" see-thru color so that I can see how much gas I have left.

Here's the UFO plate, cut for my WER steering damper.  I think it looks pretty good, myself.

 

I also have an ASV brake lever.  After running Tusk handguards for awhile, I've removed them and will probably mount some open ended Cycra guards to save weight and because I just rarely ride in thick bark-busting woods.  I'm using Gaundo grips with bar ends.  I really like running bar ends and they really do keep the grips in good shape.

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