Premed sdn

Successful Applicant Profiles

FlexMedRochester Early Assurance Program (EAP)Dental MedicineMedicineM.D./MBAM.D./Ph.DOptometryPhysical TherapyPhysician AssistantM.D./MPHPodiatryVeterinarySUNY Downstate Early Medical Education (EME)


Medicine


Photo: Wasie KarimName: Wasie Karim

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Arabic

Overall GPA: 3.96

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Harvard Medical School.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: I was initially drawn to medicine through my own personal experiences as a patient. I had an incredible physician who exposed me to the intimate, human side of medicine, where you take on the privileged role of guiding people through some of their most vulnerable moments, whether you can or cannot actually cure or treat their condition. That, combined with physicians’ incredible potential to serve as educators and social justice advocates, drew me to medicine.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Research. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Lab at Mount Sinai Hospital, Social Policy Research at the Mailman School of Public Health.

Clinical: Internsive Care Unit Clinical Volunteer, Pediatric Clinical Volunteer, and Infant Cuddler (I rocked babies to sleep) at Stony Brook and a pediatric gastroenterologist at Mount Sinai Hospital.

Nonclinical. Cabin Counselor at Camp Oasis; Resident Assistant for [email protected]; Arabic Teaching Assistant; Study Abroad in Amman, Jordan; Macaulay Peer Mentor; Intern at FoodMarble.

Employment. Patient Safety Intern at ColumbiaDoctors; Pre-College Tutor for Kaplan; Front Desk Associate at Equinox.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: The amount varied with my coursework, ranging anywhere from 10 hours on a lighter week to as many as 35 hours during midterms or finals.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: No, I self-studied for the MCAT. I liked self-studying because it allowed me to mix resources from different companies, and also let me tailor my studying to my weaknesses. I also found this to be much cheaper than a prep course. I personally used the Princeton Review content books, Khan Academy, Next Step’s practice tests, UWorld, Jack Westin’s Daily CARS Passages, Anki, and all the AAMC materials.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I took two gap years to pursue an MPH at Columbia University before medical school, largely because I developed a passion for healthcare policy and social equity through my coursework at Hunter. I chose this route over a condensed MD/MPH program because I wanted to have a full two years to take more public health coursework. My long-term goals are directly related to public health, so I feel that my two gap years were worth the time.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I think my greatest strength was creating a narrative that tied my academic, extracurricular, and personal experiences together. Throughout college, I tried to approach pre-med with intentionality, pursuing the activities I felt most interested in or most passionate about. This gave my application continuity and depth. By pursuing research, volunteering, and other activities that were more aligned with my personal interests, I was able to collect stronger letters of recommendation and build a cohesive narrative in my application that clearly conveyed my interests and goals.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: I applied to 15 schools in the Northeast and 6 schools outside the Northeast.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
The Pre-Health Advising Office did a great job setting realistic expectations early on about how competitive the medical school application process is. I visited Kemile regularly to ensure I had an honest understanding of my candidacy for medical school, and she advised me on ways I could improve deficiencies in my application. When it came time to apply, Kemile and Veronica both provided invaluable feedback on my essays. I also scheduled multiple mock interviews with Veronica, all of which were very constructive. During these sessions, she made sure to push me out of my comfort zone, which was crucial because I would much rather have stumbled during a mock interview than during a real interview.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Don't treat pre-med like a checklist. It's easy to fall into the mindset of, “I'm premed, so I just need some clinical hours, nonclinical volunteering, research, and decent grades.” These things are important, but to the best of your ability, try to pursue activities and courses that excite you. That way, you can enjoy your activities over long periods of time, add depth to your experiences, secure stronger letters of recommendation, and reduce your chances of burning out. Similarly, don't feel like you have to be a science major if you are also interested in economics, human rights, English or any other subject—you'll have to take the medical school prerequisites no matter what major you select anyway. When you apply for medical school, it'll be much easier to write about your experiences this way because your passion will be genuine.

Maintain humility. Get advice from your mentors; don't take constructive criticism personally; approach every situation/person with the mindset that you can learn something from them; and reflect on your own strengths and weaknesses. Everyone has room to improve. Premed is a long path, and you will find more success along the way if you are willing to grow through the process.

Stay organized. We keep up with a lot of commitments as pre-health students, so it's helpful to have an organization system in place. I personally use a planner and make to-do lists to keep track of everything.


Photo: D'Nea GalbraithName: D'Nea Galbraith

Major: Psychology, Thomas Hunter Honors Program

Minor: Biology, Chemistry

Overall GPA: 3.92

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Albany Medical College.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: I was always interested in science, and I knew I would pursue a career in science. When I started Hunter, I was aiming for a Ph.D. in Neuroscience. However, I realized I was unfulfilled with solely research and became drawn to patient interaction when I shadowed doctors at New York-Presbyterian.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: I was in the BP-ENDURE program which is a Neuroscience Research Fellowship. I was also a Pre-Health Mentor and the Secretary of AMSA.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A:I took a test prep course years before my MCAT but not while actively studying.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took a GAP year to gain more clinical experience as most of my experiences throughout college were in research.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I believe the strengths of my application are both my research and clinical experiences: I was a research scholar in college and worked as a patient care coordinator at Memorial Sloan Kettering throughout my gap year.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A:Having a pre-health advisor helped me stay on track as a premed student. It was also helpful to have a space to meet like-minded students along the way. Throughout the medical school application process, several advisors in the pre-health advising office supported me.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: You are NOT an imposter! As cliche as it sounds, you miss 100 percent of the shots that you don't take. There were several times when I wanted to give up or turn back because I just didn’t have enough faith in myself to keep going. I felt like an imposter—this field was not for me. But my entire journey taught me to believe in myself and to keep moving forward. Imposter Syndrome is real, but don’t let it get the best of you, STOP you. Keep your eyes on the prize and learn to believe in yourself.


Photo: Halyna KrylyukName: Halyna Krylyuk

Major: Political Science

Minor: None

Overall GPA: 3.8

Graduation Year: 2021

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My family's involvement in medicine initially sparked my interest in the field. As I began to volunteer in various areas of healthcare, I confirmed that this was the career for me. I enjoy the aspect of lifelong learning, potential for teaching/research/etc., and the devotion to care that medicine encompasses.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: I completed volunteer work with Coney Island Hospital, PHMI, the Remote Resource Initiative, and Helpers for Covid 19. I volunteered at a research lab at the Hansjorg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery at NYU, and shadowed a dermatologist. I worked as a tutor, and at a dental office.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I would spend about 30 hours per week studying, but this number would change based on workload and exam schedules.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: No. I self-studied for the MCAT.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: No, I chose not to take a gap year.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I think my MCAT score, my personal statement, my research experience, and my interviews are the strengths of my application.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, along the East Coast and California.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health office helped me achieve my goals by keeping me accountable for staying on track with all the parts of my application. When it was time to apply, the office helped me narrow down my school list, and prepared me thoroughly for the Casper exam, traditional interviews, and MMIs.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Set firm goals, but be kind to yourself throughout the process. Do not hesitate to reach out for help when you need it. But most importantly, make sure that this field is really what you want to do in life, because once you make that commitment, you have endless motivation to follow through with everything the process requires.


Photo: Daniela YakobashviliName: Daniela Yakobashvili

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Computer Science

Overall GPA: 3.8

Graduation Year: 2020

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: As someone who was an avid athlete, and in the pursuit of optimizing my own physical capabilities, I tried to teach myself everything from muscular physiology to nutrient metabolism. Studying how the human body works fascinated me. When I became a trainer at a sports rehabilitation center, however, I discovered the ways in which the human body doesn’t work, and that was what truly aroused my curiosity for medicine.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Researcher in a bio-nanotechnology lab; Medical shadow at the Iris Cantor Women’s Health Center NYP; participant in the Practicing Medicine Program at Weill Cornell Medicine; ER volunteer at Staten Island University Hospital; technician at Fusion Physical Therapy & Sports Performance; ambassador for the Pre-Health Mentoring Initiative; Peer TA for biochemistry; and Hunter Women’s Varsity Tennis (Go Hawks!)

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I studied between 20 to 30 hours per week.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A:No

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I took a gap year because I had only made the decision I wanted to pursue a medical degree at the end of my third year, so I needed extra time to improve my resume and study for my MCAT.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My research experience and specifically, the several conferences I attended and awards I won on behalf of my work.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: No. I chose to apply early decision to NJMS because it was my first choice school.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health Office helped to keep me on schedule to make sure I had all of the materials I needed to submit a well-rounded application to medical school. They also helped me find great volunteer and clinical opportunities, draft my applications, and prepare for interviews. I partly attribute my success to their constant support in my endeavors.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Do NOT choose extracurricular activities that you “think” would look impressive to medical schools. Find experiences you truly enjoy; this way you will get the most out of what you do and indirectly end up making yourself a stronger applicant for medical schools. Be authentic and genuine! If the experience you want is unavailable, then create it! Do not be afraid to call up a place you’ve always wanted to work at and ask if they have any positions available. Be your own advocate!


Photo: Giussepe YanezName: Giussepe Yanez

Major: Biological Sciences

Minor: None

Overall GPA: 3.8

Graduation Year: 2020

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Duke University School of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: I was drawn to medicine by the versatility of paths that I saw physicians pursue throughout their careers. The field allows me to bring together my various passions in research, global health, and work within local communities. Medicine allows us to directly impact underserved populations and combat the barriers that create health disparities. I was particularly drawn to the need for more underrepresented students in medicine so that we may provide care for our communities.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: I took part in Research, the Heart-to-Heart Outreach Program through Weill Cornell Medicine, Pharmacy Volunteer, Hospital Patient Navigator, Sports Leagues for Kids, Mentorship Programs, Peer Health Exchange, and Physician Shadowing.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Around 25-30 hours a week

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, Kaplan. I used it more for the content review and combined it with other resources including the AAMC materials, Berkley Review, Next Step, and UWorld.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I took several gap years and used this time to improve my academic credentials and explore research opportunities. I worked full-time conducting basic science research and also prepared for my MCAT.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My research experience was my greatest strength because I had the opportunity to work on various longitudinal projects for several years. Through my research experiences, I accumulated a deeper understanding of what bench work entails and the types of challenges that come with it. Additionally, I was able to directly see the crucial role that research plays throughout the field of medicine.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, I applied broadly across the country and was open to schools in a wide range of regions.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A:The Pre-Health Advising Office supported my goals from the very first meeting I had with a peer advisor. From early on, the advisors helped me develop a long-term plan that would work for my specific situation. From workshops to individual meetings, the advising office connected me to volunteer and professional development opportunities throughout NYC. The Pre-Health advisors helped me through each step of the application process and provided plenty of opportunities for individual mock interviews, writing revisions, and decision-making counseling.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Pursue your own interests and passions without comparing yourself to your peers. Do not feel like you have to do the typical Pre-Health extracurricular activities, and make sure to follow your unique path to medicine. There are many applicable skills you can develop through activities that aren’t directly related to medicine. The years before medical school are a great time to explore things outside of medicine so you can continue to develop them throughout your career. You will find that many of these interests and experiences will help you better connect with your patients and colleagues in the future.


Photo: Alexis NdukaName: Alexis Nduka

Major: Human Biology

Minor: Political Science

Overall GPA: 3.6

Graduation Year: Spring 2018

Matriculation Year: Fall 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Geisinger Commonwealth Medical School.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: Apart from patient care and my interest in biology, what drew me to medicine is the field’s multidimensionality. I love the fact that various factors such as SES, religion, and race intersect with medicine. This calls on me to remain inquisitive and informed on mitigating factors that affect patient health outcomes. I also look forward to building long-term relationships with patients of various backgrounds and health conditions. I am eager to be in the position of treating and educating my patients in the hopes that they will not only implement positive changes into their lifestyle but also educate their extended family members and others.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Volunteered with Project Healthcare at Bellevue Hospital, interned at the Manhattan Borough President’s Office, participated in the Harvard University Divinity and Explorations program, Vice President of AMSA at Hunter College, participated in the Narrative Medicine workshops held at Hunter College (in collaboration with Columbia University), played steel pan in my church’s steel pan group, served as recording secretary in my church’s women’s ministry, served as a Peer TA for Organic Chemistry, worked as a receptionist/medical assistant at an outpatient vein surgery center, volunteered as a research intern at Hunter College in the Anthropology Department, worked at Columbia Medical Center as a Clinical Research Assistant in the Aging and Dementia department, worked at Zara as a sales associate, worked at Hunter College as a teacher’s assistant (adjunct lecturer) in organic chemistry.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Upwards of 35 hours a week.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, I used The Princeton Review test prep course.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes. I took gap years to save money for the application, the MCAT exam, and possible travel fees. I also took gap years to study for the MCAT and strengthen my research experience.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: Although health experience is crucial when applying to medical school, a notable strength in my application was the diversity of my extracurricular activities. As you can see from my activities list, I was involved in various programs of different disciplines. I participated in those programs because I wanted to understand how different factors (like religion, public policy, etc) impact the delivery of healthcare. The diversity of my experiences have not only made my AMCAS application stand out but they have also created unique conversations during interviews.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, I did.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health Advising Office was instrumental in gaining admission into medical school. During my pre-med journey, the Pre-Health Office sent information on internships, job ads, and summer programs. I participated in Project Healthcare, a summer program at Bellevue Hospital that gave me over 300 clinical hours in their emergency department. The Pre-Health Office also assisted in editing my essays to various programs. I especially appreciate Nina spending several sessions with me so that I could complete these essays by their deadline. Kemile was always willing to provide counsel both during my undergraduate years and post-graduation. The Pre-Health Advising Office went above and beyond, offering clarity when, at times, the pre-med journey looks hazy. I wholeheartedly believe I could not have done this without you all. Thank you!

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: My advice is: participate in programs because you’re interested in them, not solely because it is health-based. It is easier to talk about something when you are passionate about it and it is good to have interests outside of medicine. Your mental health will thank you!


Photo: Harry KimName: Harry Kim

Major: Economics

Minor: Chemistry Overall GPA: 3.55 (3.98 postbacc GPA)

Graduation Year: 2014

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My previous experience as an EMT and an Army medic.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: PTSD Research at Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic Sinai Research Associate at St. Luke’s and Mt. Sinai West; US Army Reserve; Team RWB (Veteran advocacy); General Chemistry TA; tutoring for student athletes and veterans; and emergency medical technician at InstaCare.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I studied between 20 and 30 hours, depending on the class work schedule for that week.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes. I used the The Princeton Review and UWorld, supplemented with other free online resources.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I was on my 7th gap year technically, and in retrospect, it was great because extra experiences definitely strengthened my application in the long run.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: A variety of experiences came together, which helped me communicate the reason why I wanted to pursue medicine. Having served in the military, I believe, was a big plus because it gave me the kind of experience that I could not have found in NYC.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes. West coast and East coast mainly.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: In my opinion, as a post-baccalaureate student who was looking to enhance his academic record, the Pre-Health Advising Office’s committee letter was vital to my success this application cycle. Working with the advisors to prepare for admissions interviews was also incredibly helpful on top of the moral support I received through my years at Hunter College.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Most important thing is to not give up in the face of doubt. Stick to the timeline, keep going, and communicate with the Pre-Health Office! This applies to everything: the coursework, MCAT prep, AMCAS, secondary applications, CASPER, VITA, SJT, and the interview process.


Photo: Michelle AmankwahName: Michelle Amankwah

Major: Biological Sciences

Minor: None

Overall GPA: 3.54

Graduation Year: January 2019

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My grandparents’ limited access to healthcare and my desire to understand the diseases they suffered from became the impetus of my devotion to pursuing medicine. Growing up, I missed the chance to form a relationship with my grandparents since they died before I was born. My passion for the sciences coupled with my dedication to serving the underserved led me to pursue medicine. With an interest in global health, becoming a physician advocate will allow me to aid in the elimination of health disparities in disadvantaged populations, starting with my own. I am inspired to empower my community through a career in medicine by providing equal and quality healthcare access for all.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Afterschool Science Instructor and Substitute Teacher at Friends Seminary, Tutoring, Wound Care Intern, PHMI Mentor, Student Volunteer at AHRCNYC with Hunter College, EDCEMP Volunteer at Montefiore Medical Center, and Research Associate at The Brooklyn Hospital Center.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Depending on the course and extracurriculars that I was involved in, the times varied. I studied weekly with my peers after science courses to review and spent some time studying individually. The amount of time spent studying increased before exams.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, but it was only helpful for reviewing content. I also found Kaplan books, UWorld, Khan Academy—especially for Psych/Soc, and resources offered by AAMC to be very helpful.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took time to study for my MCAT, strengthen my application, and also to work on my finances.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I believe that my strengths were my grades, which displayed an upward trend indicating resilience and determination, my personal story and motives for pursuing a career in medicine, and my extracurriculars.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: Being a first-generation college student, there were many things that I was not aware of, especially being the first in my family to pursue medicine. Transitioning from high school into college was a very stressful ordeal. The Pre-Health Advising Office offered significant support that helped me in this journey. Kemile Jackson helped me map out a realistic course plan each semester as a pre-health student and provided me with recommendations of resources and tools that I needed to succeed (i.e. online resources, additional textbooks, tutors). The Pre-Health Advising Office also kept me informed about different programs that I could engage in for extracurriculars and provided workshops that were extremely helpful and insightful for the journey as a pre-health student. When the time came to begin applying in what was a different and difficult year for everyone, Kemile helped me carve out my school choices and together, we found schools whose missions aligned with my passions and goals as a future physician. When it came to my personal statement, primary and secondary applications, the Pre-Health advisors read through them and provided me with constructive feedback to further strengthen my essays. Lastly, when it came time for interviews, I had mock interviews with Nina Ledis, where she provided me with guidance that helped me feel confident and prepared for my interviews.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Please, please, believe in yourself and don't give up. There may be some challenges along the way but don’t let that push you away from your dream or goals. “Success is not how high you jump, but it is how high you bounce when you hit rock bottom.” Remember the reason why you started on this journey and let that be your motivation. Stay informed and seek help when needed from the Pre-Health Office; they will inform you of anything and everything you need to know. They will help you craft a plan that is geared towards your passions and goals. Find mentors and a strong support system that will be there for you through the process. Remember that everyone’s journey is different and unique, stay true to your dream and go after it. Trust and enjoy the process and journey. Remember to take care of yourself, your future self will thank you! Wishing you the best of luck!


Photo: Ismat ZerinName: Ismat Zerin

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: None

Overall GPA: 3.49

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2021

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: SUNY Upstate Medical University.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My experiences in clinical settings drew me to the field of medicine.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: I was an Emergency Room Volunteer and Patient Care Unit Volunteer; I conducted clinical research through the Research Associate Program at NYU; I performed Biochemistry research in Dr. David Foster’s lab at Hunter College; I worked as a Lab Technician at Weill Cornell Medicine; and I was also a member of the Hunter College Chapter of the American Red Cross

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I did not keep an exact record of my hours but I would spend a lot of time in the Hunter Library. I think it was dependent on the classes I was taking. Some classes required more effort than others. I am also a visual learner so I used lots of YouTube videos to understand difficult concepts. As a result, I probably spent more hours learning the material and studying for exams than other students in the course.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: I used the Princeton Review course, but I do think it’s going to depend on you. You have to put in the time and effort on your own in addition to attending the class sessions. Attending the classes alone will not help you score well; it didn’t for me at least. You have to take many practice exams and try to understand what type of questions are most difficult for you. Timing your exams is also very important because when I took longer to complete the sections, my scores were higher. However, the MCAT is a timed exam so you have to become skilled at managing your time during the exam.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I took 2 gap years and did a master’s program to enhance my academic profile and gain more professional experiences before starting medical school.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My volunteer, research, and leadership roles were the strengths in my application. Medical schools want you to be able to work on teams as well as take on leadership roles because as a physician you will be working with a medical team as well as acting as a leader. Research is a big part of medicine, too, and you can either be part of clinical research or bench research. The important part of being involved in research is being passionate about the work you’re doing. It is important to find a research field that you’re particularly interested in. Also, working within the healthcare field is a tremendous advantage, especially if you work with patients. You can also check out the AAMC core competencies webpage to learn more. Link provided below.

https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/what-medical-schools-are-looking-understanding-15-core-competencies

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: I applied to medical schools across the country this past cycle. The first cycle that I applied, I chose both MD and DO schools in the US and one school in Nicosia.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: Kemile was available to talk to me whenever I was having trouble deciding on what to do at different stages of my journey. She helped me choose the master’s program that I ended up doing and she provided lots of details as to how to enhance my profile. Also, I asked Veronica Mitchell for help with my application materials and when it was time for me to interview she did a mock interview with me. Veronica boosted my confidence and helped me become comfortable with interviewing.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: If this is what you want to do, don’t give up! Sometimes you have to hear the hard truth to re-evaluate and enhance your medical school applicant profile. I did not want to do a master’s program but Kemile advised me to do it, and it made all the difference in making me a stronger candidate for medical school. So I would say you should trust your Pre-Health advisors because they do have a lot of experience and they can help you obtain better outcomes. I did not have a competitive undergraduate GPA but I knew that this is the field I wanted to pursue so I tried my hardest to keep adding to my resume as advised by Kemile. I eventually became a competitive applicant and now I am very happy to report that I will start medical school in Fall 2021.


Headshot: Sun "Sunny" Young ChungName: Sun Young Chung

Major: Behavioral Neuroscience, Public Policy

Overall GPA: 3.97

Graduation Year: 2016

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Harvard Medical School.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: Medicine unites two elements that I love: discovering and underrstand the mysteries of the human body and working closely with people. I'm a people-person through and through; being able to treat patients directly and work alongside other health professionals in a team-oriented environment are exciting. I aim to pursue academic medicine and hope to remain engaged in research throughout my career.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: New York Cares (as a volunteer and team leader), various hospital volunteering positions across different departments at Sloan Kettering and NYP-Weill Cornell, and an advocate for victims of violence/abuse at the NYP-Weill Cornell Emergency Deopt. I was also performing neuroscience lab research for over a decade since high school (including: Summer research at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Stem cell research and Parkinson's disease/regenerative medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering throughout and post undergrad).

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Variable: Between 10-20 hours depending on exam schedules/deadlines.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, but I did not find it helpful. I generally would not recommend prep courses as they can be a money/time sink and create a false sense of security.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, to continue working on my projects in lab, strengthen my personal finances, and study for the MCAT.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: Extensive research, and my experiences in service/volunteering. I pursued a diversity of activities across research, volunteering, and public health.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, lots and lots of schools.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: Committee Letters are essential for building a strong application. I think in-person advising was so helpful as the medical school applications process (in the years leading up to it—reom pre-reqs to essays/interviews) can be mentally very taxing. The pre-health advising website and listserv also has a wealth of information that can be helpful to students.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: I'd like to believe that “where there's a will, there's a way.” With dedication, optimism and a clear set of goals, (and guidance from wise/compassionate individuals around you), even the unimaginable can be achieved. The path to medical school was not easy, straightforward one, but I believe that persistence and hard work can make a great difference. I am extremely grateful for many things and I truly could not have done this alone.

 


 

Headshot: Keith McConnName: Keith McConn

Major: Biology

Minor: None

Overall GPA: 3.695

Graduation Year: 2017

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school will you be attending?
A: Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: Mainly, a natural interest in science. More personally, living in an underserved minority community in New York City, I experienced friends, neighbors, and others dealing with health issues with not much in the way of a plan of treatment. Addiction, obesity, and poor sexual health were prevalent and continue to be where I live. With this being my environment, I became interested in these health issues going on around me. This is what eventually led to my interest in science and medicine.

Q: What erxtracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Volunteering in my local emergency department as well as in the community (events like City Harvest, soup kitchen assistance), working in research, which I began in my senior year of college and continued after graduation.

Q: How many hours on average did you spenmd studying for your courses per week?
A: At least 30; I viewed this like a full time job.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: No, I did not have the financial resources to pay for a course. I used second-hand reveiw books, and saved to purchase question banks and full-length exams from Next Step and AAMC.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes. I took multiple gap years. Working on top of school obligations and clinical volunteering left very little time for MCAT studying or community service. I took time to focus on understanding content tested on the MCAT as well as doing local volunteering through the Red Cross.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: Perhaps my strength is my background and my personal narrative. I come from a lower middle-class, single parent household in the heart of Harlem. Despite my hardships, I worked hard and was resourceful until I was able to get my foot in the door. I do not mean to imply that you have to come from a difficult background or major adversity to be a strong applicant to medical school. What I am saying is that if this is something you truly want to pursue, something you have a passion in, you should go for it despite the struggles.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes. I applied to 18 medical schools in the East Coast and 2 medical schools in the Midwest. In the end I chose to attend one of the two schools that I applied to in the Midwest.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: Having the drive and determination to attend medical school isn't always enough. The Pre-Health Office gave me some much-needed direction. They've been in y corner and they are experts in this procdess. There is no doubt that I wouldn't have gotten this far without them.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Listen to the advice of your pre-health advisor, especially the director of the Pre-Health Program, Kemile Jackson.

 


 

Headshot: Branden SosaName: Branden Sosa

Major: Biochemistry & Thomas Hunter Honors

Minor: Economics

Overall GPA: 3.83

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Weill Cornell Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: There is no field like medicine. As a doctor you have the opportunity to get a unique insight into a patient’s story and, sometimes, become a part of it. As a Latino from the Bronx, I know how healthcare is not always accessible to those who need it most. The more I realized this, the more I felt compelled to make a difference.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Association of Hispanic Healthcare Executives, LMSA+, Heads Up!, Mentoring in Action, Office Manager at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), Clinical and Translational Research at HSS, Basic Science Research at the Population Council.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: 20-30 hours spread out throughout the week.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, but I found it mostly helpful as content review.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took a gap year to continue the research I was involved in and study for the MCAT. I am definitely glad I took this gap year.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: Research and leadership experiences.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, and I would recommend applying nationally; you may be surprised how much you like a school and its city.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: Kemile Jackson is an amazing resource for all Pre-Health students at Hunter College. From my first week at Hunter College to my last, she helped me select courses, decide to take a leave of absence, prioritize extracurriculars, apply to medical school, and much more.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Find mentors! Establishing mentors who are doctors, medical students, college students, etc., will help you achieve your goals. Having great mentors is invaluable at any stage of your career. I would also suggest being a mentor for others. Whether it be lowerclassmen or high school students, they could really benefit from your knowledge and experiences.

 


 

Photo: Agnes Ivaskeviciute-JiangName: Agnes Ivaskeviciute-Jiang

Major: Chemistry (Biochemistry track),
Human Biology (Human Organizations track)

Overall GPA: 4.0

Graduation Year: 2020

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: SUNY Downstate College of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: Medicine was the perfect career for me when trying to combine two of my passions—social work and science. I wasn't able to make up my mind about which path I should choose, so medicine was a career that combined both in the best way possible. I am from Lithuania, and we have to choose our careers while still in high school, with no undergraduate studies before entering medical school. I completed four out of six years of medical studies there, which put my decision to become a doctor to the test countless times.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Clinical volunteering and shadowing, research (bench research at Hunter College and clinical research at NYU Langone), math tutoring, and pre-health mentoring.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: 20 hours.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: No, I self-studied.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: No, I did not take a gap year.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: No, I applied to 12 schools total, all on the East Coast.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The most helpful aspect for me was the advisors' availability whenwriting my personal statement and crafting secondary essays. English is not my first language, so it was very reassuring to have someone available to look over my written material. Also, I had a great experience when preparing for medical school interviews. The mock interviews were very useful and helped to build confidence.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Prioritize your GPA and your MCAT scores. Those are the first two things the admission offices will see. Make sure you're involved in meaningful extracurricular activities that you are passionate about, and can talk about in great detail. In a pool of applicants with great GPAs and great MCAT scores, your extracurriculars and your personal experiences are what will set you apart from others. If it's too hard to maintain a high GPA and be involved in extracurriculars, take a gap year so yu can focus on one thing at a time. Lastly, do not get intimidated. It is easy to undermine your own achievements when comparing yourself to others. The truth of the matter is, no two applicants are the same. You have your own story, your own obstacles that you had to overcome, your own strengths and achievements. Make sure you recognize what sets you apart from others and emphasize it in your application. Best of luck!

 


 

Headshot: Sophie HudesName: Sophie Hudes

Major: Biochemistry, Special Honors

Minor: Hebraic Studies

Overall GPA: 3.96

Graduation Year: Spring 2020

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Medical School of International Health (at Ben Gurion University)

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: I have been interested in medicine since I was a child, but I only began to understand what the field really involved right before starting college. Personal and professional experience confirmed my interests and led me to where I am now. I am passionate about medicine and global health and hope to one day combine these interests in my future career. This medical school program has a specific focus in global health, and I am truly excited to study both much needed fields.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: I was the president of the Society of Bioethics and Medicine and the treasurer for the Gift of Life Club at Hunter. I have volunteered in the Bellevue Hospital (PAVERS program), AlYN Hospital, and Hadassah Hospital. I also served as a senior first responder for Megen David Adom, the national ambulence service in Israel. I shadowed physicians in Greece through the Atlantis program and was a volunteer in Costa Rica for the Foundation of International Medical Relief of Children (FIMRC). I was a campus ambassador for Gift of Life and a campus representative for FIMRC as well. I was fortunate enough to be a research intern in Dr. Nancy Greenbaum's biochmesitry laboratory at Hunter College and volunteer in the Heart to Heart program through Weill Cornell.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Depending on the course and time of semester, I would study around 5 hours a week per course, including the time it took me to complete homework and assignments/papers.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, I used the Princeton Review Course for the MCAT that I found through Hunter's Pre-Health Office in the fall of my Junior year.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I took a “gap” year before starting college to study abroad in Israel and am matriculating to medical school straight after graduating college.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I consider my strengths to be my letters of recommendation and my personal statement/essays. Standing out with diverse interests and a true and clear passion for medicine (or any career aspiration) is important and I believe my application demonstrated who I am and what I want to accomplish.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: I applied nationally and internationally (to programs affiliated/based in the U.S.).

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: Their constant advice on my application and its contents was extremely helpful and they were approachable for any small question I had throughout my college career. Mock interviews were also an incredible opportunity for me to practice and allowed me to feel comfortable expessing to schools who I was and why they should want me at their institution.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: My advice would be to take it slow and breathe. This is a long and grueling process that I have no doubt, with some determination and positivity, can be achieved. Take everything step by step and try to plan out what you should work on one step at a one time. Constantly remind yourself why you are putting yourself under immense stress and do not forget to relax and make time for yourself.

School-wise, definitely try to create close relationships with professors since you never know what opportunity might present itself to you. Letters of recommendation are always stronger when the person knows you and can talk about how hard working you are, and not just that you earned an A. I would also say ask around if possible, to network and find research or other volunteering opportunities. There are so many places happy to train new students that are eager to learn.

In terms of applying, research schools that best fit your interest because they will see right through your trying to fit yourself into what you think they want their student to be. Try to find somewhere that gets you excited thinking about all the opportunities you could have, and a place that can set you off where you want to be in the future while also being realistic! Basically, keep up the amazing work you are doing, and I am sure you will do great!

 


 

Headshot: Yasmine OpreaName: Yasmine Oprea

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Sociology

Overall GPA: 3.96

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: I am interested in medicine because it is the ideal combination of science, research, education, and service. I am drawn to this profession as it integrates all of these interests—medicine encourages scientific inquiry and innovation through research, allows for the continuous improvement of scientific knowledge, and provides the unique opportunity to use this knowledge to make human connections by caring for patients.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Laboratory research in the Department of Biological Sciences at Hunter College, CDCB Summer Research Program at Oregon Health and Science University, teaching health education through Peer Health Exchange, clinical volunteering at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, volunteering for the Weill Cornell Heart-to-Heart Outreach Program. I also participated in mentorship programs as well as physician shadowing, served as a Biochemistry Peer TA at Hunter College, and was part of the McNulty Scholars Program.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: The number of hours that I spent studying for courses varied each week, but I would always make to-do lists to organize my time and make sure to prioritize courses for which I had upcoming exams or deadlines.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: No, I did not use a test prep course to study for the MCAT. The resources I found to be most helpful were: all of the AAMC materials, Kaplan reviw books, ExamKrackers review books, as well as NextStep practice tests.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took one gap year, during which I worked at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, because I was interested in further exploring scientific research and working in a lab full-time. It was a great opportunity to build upon my research skills and experience, all while learning so much about another field of science and contributing to cutting-edge research. During this time, I was also able to focus on my medical school applications.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My strong interest in research as well as my involvement in a wide range of community service experiences. Additionally, I believe that forming relationships with my mentors and advisors was incredibly valuable, because they not only served as a great support system but were also able to convey my strengths well in my letters of recommendation.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health Advising Office has been such a significant source of support throughout the entirety of my undergraduate career as well as throughout the medical school application process. Early on, the pre-health advisors helped guide and encourage me in pursuing extracurricular and research opportunities, ensuring that I was on the right path to becoming a strong applicant. During the application process, the pre-health advisors were especially helpful in reviewing my personal statement and all other application materials, as well as conducting mock interviews. I am very grateful for all of the mentorship and support that I have received from the Pre-Health Office!

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Applying to medical school is a long and challenging process, so seek out mentors and a strong support system. Be proactive in identifying and engaging in extracurricular opportunities, and don't be afraid to explore a broad range of experiences. However, dedicate your time to the activities that you gravitate most towards and are truly passionate about. Seek out guidance and feedback from advisors throughout the process, make sure to apply only when fully prepared, and stay focused and confident!

 


 

Iovana Bonfante Gonzalez PhotoName: Iovana Bonfante Gonzalez

Major: Human Biology, Track I: Body, Mind & Health

Minor: Chemistry

Overall GPA: 3.85

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school will you be attending?
A: Loyola Stritch School of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My own personal immigrant experience, community outreach, and familial history in nursing sparked my curiosity in understanding the connection between quality of life, socioeconomic status and health disparities. As I pursued different opportunities in community advocacy and health care, along with my academics, I realized my true passion was being on the front lines of medical innovation, healing and advocating for others.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Research:SCORE Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Clinical research experiences at Maimonides Medical Center Emergency Department, NYP-Methodist Hospital Internal Medicine & NYP-Weill Cornell Emergency Department.

Community Outreach: Tutor for Harlem Renaissance High School through Hunter Liberty Partnership Program, Bronx Oncology Living Daily Program Intern & Bilingual Consultant at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Shape Up NYC Volunteer Group Fitness Instructor.

Extracurriculars: Hunter College Women's Basketball Team, High School Sports Coach at Cathedral High School: Varsity Volleyball, JV Basketball, Varsity Lacrosse and Track & Field, Bronx Music Heritage Center Conga classes, Academic Coach and Science Learning Center Tutor at Lehman College.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: 10-15 hrs./week.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, I utilized Princeton Review to help guide my self-studying. I also tapped into other resources such as: Khan Academy, daily MCAT questions & Jack Westin CARS passages.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took 2 gap years to study for the MCAT, prepare for AMCAS and pursue additional community engagement opportunities.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My academic history, my personal story and clinical experiences.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: As the first in my family to go to medical school, learning to navigate pre-med courses, studying for the MCAT and application prep felt very overwhelming. I am grateful for the Pre-Health Advising Office's workshops on time/stress management, MCAT study schedules, walk-in advising appointments, personal statement editing, interview prep, medical school decision options and more. Thank you, Pre-Health Advising Team!

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Overall, enjoy the process and inform yourself as much as possible by attending workshops and seeking opportunities that are at par with what you are most passionate about. Remember, even if you feel you have taken two steps back or failed at something, do not give up. Refledct on your experience, create a plan (possibly re-draft multiple times along the way) and go for it. Do not be afraid to ask for guidance and be kind to yourself. Everyone's journey is different so identify what makes you unique and hold on to that. What you want for your life is in your reach.

 


 

Anna Skakodub PhotoName: Anna Skakodub

Major: Chemistry (Biochemistry track)

Overall GPA: 3.83

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school will you be attending?
A: Penn State College of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My passion for medicine had its roots in my childhood. From a young age, I was fascinated with anatomical atlases and learning about the human body. Having doctors in my family further sparked my interest. The most important figure in establishing my love of medicine was (and still is) my father. As a teenager, I often joined him in the hospital as he rounded on patients. Through seeing my father help so many women discover the joy of motherhood, I was able to fully understand how important the role of physician is. Witnessing the gratitude of his patients, I quickly came to admire the impact he was able to make on their lives. The idea that I can give health and healing to a person forever set my career choice, and I don't recall ever wavering from that.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: 1) Reach Out and Read program, Bellevue Hospital; 2) Research Associate Program, Emergency Department, NYP; 3) English Summer Camp Volunteer, Ukraine; 4) 2017 SCORE (Summer Clinical Oncology Research Experience) Program, Department of Neurology, MSKCC; 5) Research Lab Volunteer, Dr. Joyner's Lab, MSKCC; 6) Clinical Research Coordinator, later Specialist, Department of Neurology, MSKCC; and 7) Foreign Language Advisory Group (FLAG) Coordinator, Division of Quality and Safety, MSKCC.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for courses per week?
A: During my undergraduate years, I was almost always employed full-time, so time management was a crucial skill I learned. I would say that I spent between 15-20 hours per week. When there was an exam, the time would go up to 30 hours.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes—I took Princeton Review prep course offered by Hunter College.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes—I planned to apply before graduating Hunter College, but as the time to take the MCAT approached, I did not feel that I was ready. Also, most importantly, I did not think I was mentally ready for the application process. I am very happy I took a gap year as during that time I improved my application immensely—for instance, I added my Nature publication co-authorship and my recommendation letter from the Chair of the Department.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: It is hard to say objectively, but I feel that my application had an interesting story (apart from a good GPA). My undergraduate experience is somewhat unique because I had to financially support myself throughout college. Fortunately, I was able to have a job through which I was introduced to the world of practical medicine and met an extraordinary team of clinicians. Also, my communication skills helped me to build connections with multiple physicians. Thus, they, in return, were able to write very personal, touching recommendation letters. I feel that all of this in combination characterized me as a person who is ready for medical training.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: I applied to East Coast schools only (from Vermont to Florida).

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you to achieve your goals?
A: As an immigrant to this country, the medical school application process was very foreign to me. Kemile Jackson helped me to understand what is required in order to become a successful candidate and she always made sure I stayed on the right track with extracurriculars. During the application process, the Pre-Health Advising Office was simply a magical support tool, and I don't think I would have ever been successful if it wasn't for their guidance and close review of my application materials together with mock interview preparation.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Please think very carefully when you choose medicine as your career. You must be truly passionate about it because it requires many sacrifices. Once you have made that important decision, I suggest that you take a practice MCAT test immediately (if you have completed Organic Chemistry), as you need to understand early in the process that this test is nothing like what you have been dealing with so far. When you choose your activities, always go with what you really like. Further, try to find a mentor—it is as important as having a 99th percentile MCAT (at least for me it was the case). And the most important thing is as you go through this amazing journey, do not forget to have some fun— you will remember this time with warmth in your heart!

 


 

Headshot: Daniel AntohiName: Daniel Ryan Antohi

Major: Biology and Psychology

Overall GPA: 3.79

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My initial interest in medicine started in childhood with my mother and grandmother, who were both formally and informally involved in healthcare. I was also very interested in science classes from an early age. I leaned into these interests and pursued various clinical and research opportunities as a high school student. In college, I pursued biology and psychology degrees and sought new clinical and research experiences. These experiences solidified my desire to pursue a career in which I can help people at their most vulnerable moments, contribute to the advancement of medicine, and be an educator.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Research—Cold Srping Harbor Neuroscience Lab, Columbia/NYSPI Psychiatry Labe, Yale Cardiology Lab. Clinical—Nassau University Hospital volunteer, Cardiology shadowing abroad, Internal Medicine shadowing, Mount Sinai SRA. Volunteering—Skirball Biology tutor, General Chemistry TA, Soup Kitchen, Columbia Special Needs Clinic.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I think it’s highly dependent on what and how many courses you're taking. As a rule, I always aimed to attend all my classes and tried to give 100% while there (phone off, front row, and participate). I then reviewed things that were challenging and attended office hours if needed. No matter the hours invested, I always wanted to go into an exam confident in my understanding.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: No, I made use of Kaplan books for Biochemistry, Khan Academy 100-page packet for Psychology/Sociology, Jack Westin daily passages for CARS, and Exam Krackers' books for Physics and Chemistry. I dedicated the majority of my time taking and reviewing practice exams (Altius, Next Step, and AAMC exams). Once you have the content down, I think it's vital to understand how the MCAT tests the content and build your stamina for the exam.

In my personal experience, and that of people I know, if you take your AAMC FL exams right before your MCAT, your scores will be VERY indicative of your actual score—don't expect huge deviations, positive or negative.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes! I wanted to put my best foot forward in my application. I worked to complete my second major and pursue some amazing research activities during my senior year. Furthermore, I obtained a postgraduate opportunity at Yale for my gap year, which proved to be an incredible academic and life experience.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: Long-term consistent dedication to medicine. I think my experience abroad, along with my extensive research involvement, made my application unique. Finally, all the wonderful recommendations of my professors and mentors.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes! I had a preference for the Northeast. However, I applied to schools all over the country, and I would encourage future applicants to apply broadly in order to maximize their chances in this very competitive process.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Hunter Pre-Health advisers have been an invaluable source of knowledge, support, and mentorship at every step in my journey as a pre-medical student, and I could not be here without them. They genuinely want to see you succeed. I encourage everyone to make use of the Pre-Health Advising Office as it is a tremendous resource.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Knowledge is power. Always make every attempt to stay informed and reach out to others for help. You have a lot of resources and very knowledgeable people at your disposal (Pre-Health advisors, professors, mentors, upperclassmen, etc.). Take advantage of these things, and you will have a much easier journey through your pre-health years. Also, be consistent in your efforts no matter what you're facing at the moment. If there's a will, there's a way, and you will find it with enough effort—believe in yourself.

 


 

Headshot: Syed DaniyalName: Syed Daniyal

Major: Human Biology

Minor: Chemistry

Overall GPA: 3.73

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Cooper Medical School of Rowan University

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: Having viewed vast health disparities in both NYC and my home country of Pakistan, I wanted to one day help fight against these inequalities. I eventually realized that becoming a physician would provide me with the most optimal way to do so.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: 1. The Pre-Health Organization; 2. Summer Medical and Dental Educational Program; 3. Mount Sinai C.A.R.E. Volunteer; 4. Rescuing Levtover Cuisine; 5. Clinical Research with Heart 2 Heart at Weill Cornell Medicine; 6. Neuroscience Research Icahn School of Medicine; 7. Surgical Oncology shadowing at North Shore LIJ; 8. Teaching at my mosque; 9. Hunter College Student Ambassador and 10. General Chemistry TA.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: This usually depended on the course and how much time I also needed to devote to my extracurriculars. I would say typically each week I would study approximately 10-15 hours.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: I did use a Kaplan test prep course, but due to also taking a full course load, I did not gain much from it aside from study strategies (I wouldn't recommend taking a course unless you are a bad test taker). After taking the course, I experimented with different studying strategies and eventually found the ones that worked best for me. My biggest score improvements occcurred when I bagen to use UWorld, which highly, highly recommend. Other than that, Khan Academy and the AAMC materials were really helpful. I recommend using them, especially since they are free.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I did end up taking a gap year mainly so I could help raise my GPA, keep building my application portfolio, and have time to take the MCAT without feeling too much pressure. During my sophomore year, I had received a C in one of my science classes, which really lowered my science GPA. So I used my junior and senior year to take as many science classes as I could and ace them to not only bring up my GPA, but to show medical schools that I learned from my mistake and became a better student because of it. I was also able to use my junior year to really build upon my experiences and complete all of my pre-requisite courses. Although I still ended up taking the MCAT while taking classes, I had already taken the majority of my required classes and, thus, was able to lessen my credit load, having more time to focus on the MCAT. Additionally, I was able to manage my extracurriculars better by senior year, only focsing on the ones that were most important to me.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I believe my strengths were in my extracurricular experiences. I chose to pursue activities that not only added to my story, but also that I actually interested in. This allowed me to enjoy them and to do them consistently over long periods of time, adding longitudinal depth to my application. This also allowed my recommendation letters from these activities to be very strong. Additionally, thanks to the Pre-Health Office and many of my friends who helped me edit my personal statement. It turned out to be very strong.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: I mainly applied to schools in the Northeast region since I wanted to stay relatively near my family, but I did apply to one school in Florida and one in Michigan because they seemed to be match schools.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health Advising Office has been extremely helpful throughout my years at Hunter College. I remember back in my freshman year, I was hesitant to travel and live in Cleveland, Ohio for a program I was accepted into, but Kemile Jackson erased any doubts I had, urging me to go. She help me like this numerous times and was always proud when I was able to achiee something or pursue an opporunity, giving me great confidence to continue on my path. I am also thankful to Nina Ledis for always making time to provide feedback during mock interviews, building my confidence that allowed me to really nail my medical school interviews whether they were traditional, MMI, mor mixed. She also greatly helped me by revising my personal statement multiple times, forcing me to iron out small details, allowing me to wrie one I am really proud of and that I could not have written without her feedback. Although J.D. Blanco is no longer with the Pre-Health Advising Office, he also helped by always letting me know which events I still had to attend for my committee letter file and help make sure my file was up-to-date. Thanks to all the mentioned members of the Pre-Health Advising Office, my Yalow advisors, Dr. Klein, Dr. Eckhardt, Dr. Alliger, and major advisor, Dr. Steiper, and countless other mentors, I have been able to achieve my goals.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Aside from obviously making sure you stay on top of your academics, college is a great place to network and explore new interests. Take the time to explore what you are interested in so that by the time you apply, you are certain you actually want to go innto the healthcare field. This will also allow yu to develop your own unique story. Make sure to surround yourself with a small group of individuals who are also driven and who make sure you stay on track to reach your goals. In addition to all this, don't forget to take time out to do things you enjoy for fun and relax.

 


 

Headshot: Katherine SandomirskyName: Katherine Sandomirsky

Major: Biology, Macaulay Honors

Minor: Psychology

Overall GPA: 3.73

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Volunteer at NYP-Weill Cornell Medical Center, Lenox Hill Hospital, and Coney Island Hospital, Teaching Assistant for Statistical Methods in Psychological Research, Behavioral Neuropathology Lab Intern, Assistant Interviewer for Prospective Macaulay Honors Candidates.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Although it varied, I spent 30-35 hours studying per week on average.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, Kaplan.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took two gap years. I utilized my time to study for the MCAT, volunteer at NYP-Weill Cornell, scribe full-time at an urgent care center in Manhattan, and complete medical school applications.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My personal statement, MCAT score, and extensive clinical experience.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, I applied to schools on the East Coast and Mid-West.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health advisors were an incredible support network! They provided informative workshops, primary and secondary application feedback, mock interviews, and encouragement throughout the admissions process.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: With respect to the MCAT, take as many full-length practice exams as possible to familiarize yourself with the passages/questions and to build endurance. Carefully review each test afterward to determine your strengths and weaknesses and to learn from your mistakes. Regarding undergraduate coursework, begin studying your lecture notes soon after lecture is over, preferably the same day, in order to cement the knowledge you learned. This will also help determine early on what topics and areas you don’t fully grasp so that you’ll have sufficient time to work on them before exams. Attend office hours to clarify misunderstandings you have with the material. Office hours are such an excellent resource! Overall, on your path to medical school, celebrate your achievements, see failures as opportunities for personal growth, and keep trying your best no matter what!

 


 

Headshot: Siam AyonName: Siam Ayon

Major: Human Biology

Minor: Chemistry

Overall GPA: 3.697

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: From an early age, I had a profound interest in science. My parents always told me I would never stop asking questions. I only felt intellectually satisfied when I studied science, since it was the only subject that truly fulfilled my curiosity. However, it was not until high school that I developed a passion for health science courses. After a close family member of mine was diagnosed with cancer in 2013, I observed the fantastic team of health professionals that took care of them, and I knew then, that I wanted to join the health field. Throughout my undergaduate career, I volunteered and conducted research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell, where I witnessed the health disparities facing many communities in NYC. My experience at MSKCC and Weill Cornell solidified my decision to become a physician in the future and desire to serve marginalized communities.

During my sophomore year of college, I changed my Primary Care Provider to a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). I was fascinated by the way she practiced medicine. She asked questions that at first seemed unrelated to my physical health. However, I realized that she wanted to asseess different circumstances that could potentially put me at risk for certain conditions. My doctor also manipulated the bones and muscles in my right wrist, to fix a constant mild pain that bothered me for months. I was intriguued by her approach to medicine. When I asked her about her unique way of treating me, she told me to read about Dr. Still. In a few days, my pain was fully gone, and after reading about the philosophy of osteopathic medicine, I knew I wanted to become a DO.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: 1. I volunteered at Memorial Sloan Ketting Cancer Center's (MSKCC) Urgent Care; 2. I shadowed Dr. Aragones, who worked at the Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities (IHCD) Department at MSKCC; 3. I conducted Public Health Research at MSKCC's IHCD department; 4. I volunteered at Weill Cornell and their Hear to Heart Community Outreach Program; 5. I held board positions in Pre-Health Organization (PHO) for three years. During my first year, I was the Social Media Manager. Then I became the Secretary. During my last year, I served as the Co-President of PHO; 6. I was also a Student Ambassador at Hunter College providing tours to prospective students and their families; 7. I mentored pre-health students with the Pre-Health Mentoring Initiative; 8. I also received certification as a Mental Health First Aide; 9. I volunteered with the Rescuing Leftover Cuisine to donate food to homeless shelters and 10. I was a student mentor for the Hunter College's Unibuddy initiative where I spoke with and mentored prospective college students who shared similar interests with me.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I spent about 25-30 hours studying per week. I studied more for exams, less when I did not have as much work. However, I am not someone who can sit and study for hours at a time. I always broke up my studying with short breaks.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: I used Princeton Review.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: I used the year after graduating from Hunter to complete a Master of Science at TouroCOM to improve my resume and increase my chances of getting into medical school. In addition to completing my MS program, I also applied to other medical schools via AACOMAS during my gap year.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I would say that one of my strengths in my application was my extracurricular activities. I know that as pre-health students we can get caught up in increasing the number of extracurricular activities we do to boost our resumes. However, it is equally as important to do extracurricular activities that we enjoy. It is easy to forget that we must talk about these activities in our application. If we just did the activities to check things off of a list, it will show in the application and hurt our chances. Luckily, I was able to seek out and participate in activities I had a genuine passion for, and I believe it showed in my applications and during my interviews.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, I applied to 14 osteopathic schools all over the country.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: To be honest, I would not have made it this far without the Pre-Health Advising Office helping me every step of the way. As a first-generation college student, I had no tangible plans for navigating the complex pre-health path. However, from the first day of college, Kemile made sure that I did everything I needed to do to make myself a competitive applicant. I frequently visited the Pre-Health Office, sometimes for advice, and sometimes just to talk about my day. I really appreciated how Kemile and JD would speak to me about my day and make sure I was always doing okay academically and personally. Additionally, thanks to the Pre-Health Office, I was also able to take a Princeton Review MCAT Course for a reduced price.

In addition to the invaluable personal support and academic counseling they provided me with, they were instrumental in making my application strong. I had multiple mock interviews with Veronica, where she provided me with countless feedback. Before an interview, she always took the time to help me craft my story for each school. Nina edited my essays numerous times to make sure that they were solid. I am extremely gratful to the Pre-Health Office for always supporting me and going above and beynd to help me achieve my goals.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: USE THE PRE-HEALTH OFFICE. I cannot stress this enough. They are there to help you and will go above and beyond to make sure you feel supported. However, you must seek out the help yourselves. They won't always tell you things you want to hear, and instead, at times, they will tell you the hard truth. However, please remember, it is much better for Veronica to give you feedback on your interviews than to do terribly in your real interview. It is much better for Nina to mark your essays red than for medical schools to think they are not well written. It is much better to let Kemile direct your application and help you get into your third-choice medical school than to fly solo and not get into any medical school.

Lastly, remember that this is your journey. Please, do not compare yourself to others. Just because your friend had a hard time getting in with a 4.0 does not mean you have no chance with your 3.5. Just because your friend will finish medical school two years earlier than you do does not make you less successful. We all have our own journeys and face unique challenges. No matter where you are in your journey, you have successfully come this far. Please, do not let other people's journeys deter you from taking a leap of faith. Be a little kinder to yourself.

 


 

Jessica Juarez PhotoName: Jessica Juarez

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Psychology

Overall GPA: 3.56

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: Raised within a family of first-generation and undocumented immigrants, I have witnessed and firsthand experienced the fears and barriers that hinder immigrants from seeking asylum and healthcare. These experiences have prompted a sense of urgency to facilitate access to social resources and services for these underserved communities and dedicate a career to advocate for those who slip through the cracks of a faculty system, who bear the extra load of being labeled as an “alien, refugee, undocumented, and immigrant.”

While at Hunter, I sought various opportunities to be actively involved with supporting medically underserved populations. I eventually became more knowledgeable of the platform that a healthcare provider holds in these communities and recognized the core elements that a physician can have in development efforts.

My vision is not only to practice medicine but also to cultivate a workforce that reflects the communities we serve. The privilege of having access to opportunities that my family did not have due to the limits of class, education, and legal status propels me to pay tribute to the programs that have supported me in my journey.

As a future healthcare provider and advocate, I strive to continue to promote programs to address the need for a diverse representation of healthcare providers in underrepresented communities and build opportunities for individuals of various backgrounds to achieve their career goals.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: I did not become involved in extracurriculars until my junior year of college. My first actual volunteer experience was volunteering as a health educator in Ecuador through EduAmistad. I also volunteered in the American Red Cross, Let’s Get Ready, and RockEdu. After graduating from Hunter, I spent the summer participating in the SCORE program at MSK, and continued participating in clinical research at Harlem Hospital through NYC H+H research internship (the Prehealth listserve advertised all of these opportunities, so keep your eyes open!). I was also a member of the Bronx Community Health Leaders (BxCHL). In this student-run organization, I came to a safe environment that fosters peer support for students underrepresented in medicine.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I studied an average of 15-20 hours a week studying for courses. Of course, more before an upcoming exam.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Yes, I used the Kaplan test prep course for the first attempt! However, I relied on self-studying for the second attempt (UWorld, Kaplan,AAMC, NS).

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: : I took two gap years post-graduation. After graduation, I took the MCAT exam and did not score near my target score. Hence, I decided to take another gap year and gain more clinical experience while studying for the MCAT retake.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My journey to this point was filled with adversity and challenges that I was able to overcome. I was a college student in the morning and transformed into a restaurant hostess at night. My path to medical school was filled with days that I thought would never end, and my dream is one that I thought I would never survive.

Without the initial guidance and the lack of a support system, admittedly, I was not a college-bound student. I was raised in a household where my parents did not have a college or even high school education, so enrolling in college was not a straightforward decision. I enrolled at LaGuardia Community College and eventually transferred to Hunter.

I was fortunate to have mentors and access to the Pre-Health Advising Office at Hunter, who have fostered a supportive environment and taught me the value of networking and advocacy; their generosity and determination instilled in me the qualities that propelled me to be optimistic. With my transcript, the idea of getting into medical school seemed impossible. During this application cycle, I learned that you do not have to be the picture “perfect” applicant. Schools do evaluate your application holistically.

I worked 15-40 hours weekly throughout my undergraduate years and maintained full-time student status. The limited time I had to study took a toll on my academics, and I had multiple C’s on my transcript. Despite the uncertainties of not having the “ideal” application, I unexpectedly had a successful cycle.

I believe my application’s strength was the personal statement and work and activities section that offers an opportunity to tell your unique story, explain your circumstances and showcase the activities that you are
involved in.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, I applied to 30+ schools, mainly on the East and West coast.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: I want to give a special shout out to the advisors at the Pre-Health Advising Office. I especially appreciate the continued support after graduation by Kemile, and Nina for the fantastic interview prep.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Do not feel deterred to pursue a dream that may seem so abstract. Meanwhile, you want to aim high stat-wise, do not feel discouraged if you do not have that 515 MCAT and 4.0 GPA like “everyone else” on SDN/Reddit or even your classmates, you can still get in. Diversity in your volunteer and research experiences are essential.

Be persistent and determined. I applied to 15+ volunteer research positions before landing on one. Seek role models and mentors early on. It takes just one role model in existence to override every reason to doubt.

The takeaway is to continue to seek guidance from your peers, mentors, and advisors; don’t compare yourself to others, and please don’t forget to share your journey while you’re at it to encourage others who are pursuing
this path.

Keep in touch with those who have supported you along the way, and even a simple email will do! Feel free to reach out if you have any questions: jessica.juarez22@myhunter.cuny.edu

 


 

Nicholas Brutus PhotoName: Nicholas Brutus

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: N/A

Overall GPA: 3.54

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school will you be attending?
A: Albany Medical College.

Q: What drew you to this particular field?
A: Shadowing in Harlem Hospital and forming connections with patients. Also, finding mentors who showed me the versatility in the medical field.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Scholar All-American, All-State, and Team Captain for the Hunter College Wrestling team.; Vice-Commissioner of the Hunter College Residence Halls; Resident Asistant for the Brookdale Residence Hall; SAAC Wrestling Representative; Volunteer Wrestling Coach at Bay Shore; Sears Shipping and Receiving Supervisor—Part-time job; and Gap year: Qualituy Team Leader at Chembio Diagnostics Systems (Medical Devices).

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Approximately 2 hours per day, 10 hours per week. The week before an exam, I studied around 15 hours per week.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: The first time that I sat for the MCAT, I self-studied. The second time I sat for the MCAT, I took the Princeton Review prep course and my score improved by 11 points.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took a gap year to focus on my MCAT and to become financially situated for medical school.

Q: What did you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My resilience showed in my MCAT improvement and overcoming my financial circumstances; finishing my undergraduate years with a strong GPA; my commitment to serving my community; my research and volunteer experiences in undergrad show my dedication to service; my athletic accolades; and strong letters of recommendation.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes. The farthest school I applied to was Wayne State SOM in Detroit, Michigan.

Q: How did the Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health Advising Office kept me on the right path. They gave me a tangible plan to obtain my goal. Every semester, I would check in with Kemile, who was one of my biggest motivators. They were honest and told me not only what I needed to hear but what I needed to do. The guidance brought me 7 medical school acceptances and mentors who are sitting deans/chairpersons at medical colleges across the City. The Pre-Health Office is a gateway for knowledge and connections.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: I have three tips to share: 1) Find your “why” and let that be your personal source of motivation; 2) Learn to be comfortable in uncomfortable situations, and 3) Don't be afraid to reach out for help.

 


 

Headshot: Gregory SylvestreName: Gregory Sylvestre

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Economics

Overall GPA: 3.51

Graduation Year: 2017

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine—Middletown Campus.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: Coming from a background of nurses in my family, I was exposed to the ideas of health-care and patient service from a young age. I came to appreciate the very involved role a physician plays in managing one’s health and their commitment to having a strong command of the biological sciences.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: I was a Pre-health Mentor for Hunter College’s Mentoring in Action program. I was also a Peer-Health educator for Peer-Health Exchange. I volunteered at NYP Brooklyn Methodist Hospital and participated in their Summer College Intensive Program (SCIP). I was also a Research Associate for NYU’s RA Internship Program.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: 10-12 hrs per week. It depended on the semester.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: : No. I self-studied using Kaplan review books, Khan Academy, and AAMC official materials. I also found that Reddit.com and SDN online forums offered helpful studying plans for those looking for a place to start.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: : I did. I wanted to use this time to prepare a little more for a MCAT retake. I also used this time for self-growth and reflection.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I think my personal statement and letters of recommendations were my strongest features. My letters came from those I believed I had a meaningful relationship/connection with me at certain points within my college career.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, I applied to several schools outside of just NY. I applied to many newer schools and those with a history of accepting applications with my stats/student profile.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-health Office did an excellent job of keeping in contact with me and reviewing my personal statement. They also kept me in the loop with pre-health opportunities via their focused emailing system. Additionally, Kemile Jackson directed me towards Touro College’s Special Masters Program after an initial unsuccessful application cycle. I was informed of my expectations for this challenging program and was guided by words of encouragement by Kemile.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Don’t give up. Its normal to have doubts along the path to medicine as to whether you’ll make it or not (I’ve had several). It’s about staying positive, taking advice from those who can give guidance, being committed and honest as to where you wish to be professionally, and believing in yourself. Each challenge you come across should be looked at as a learning experience to propel you in the right direction.

The MCAT is very important but is not the be-all and end-all. Take your time when preparing for the exam. Try your best to understand the content and limit memorizing. This will make the process more fruitful and manageable. This idea will also carry over into medical school and allow you to navigate the vast amount of material. Additionally, practice tests, practice tests and more PRACTICE TESTS. You always want to commit to doing more practice exams/questions and analyzing them closely vs. mainly reviewing content.

Lastly, it's important to take breaks and maintain a connection to activities/hobbies that bring you joy. Your mental health is the most important part of you and should always be protected. Rest and recharge as you see fit. Don't feel guilty about it. Your future-self and patients will thank you.

 


 

Headshot: Cristina ZambranoName: Cristina Zambrano

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Sociology and Philosophy

Overall GPA: 3.49

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2020

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: The need for good medical care and advocacy for health equity in underrepresented communities is what drove me to this field.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: The need for good medical care and advocacy for health equity in underrepresented communities is what drove me into this field.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Volunteered at the Consulate of Ecuuador in New York for five years. Volunteer patient feeder at Lenox Hill Hospital and shadowed at the same hospital. Member of the Provost Search Committee at Hunter College in 2018. Research Associate at the Ogunwobi Laboratory, Hunter College, since 2018.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Depended on the course. For basic science courses, about 10-15 hours.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: I used the Princeton Review Pep Course offerred by the Hunter College Pre-Health Office.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took a gap year. I was working full-time to become more financially stable and to continue working on research.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: The strengths in my application were my extracurricular activities. While my GPA was average and my MCAT score was on the lower end, I had a lot of volunteer work and research experience. By the time I interviewed, I had my first author article published. I also believe that in my personal statement and my experiences section, I consistently highlighted the motivations and attributes that would allow me to succeed in this career path.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, but mostly to institutions on the East Coast.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health Office was helpful through my application process. The advisors helped me with my personal statement, experiences descriptions and practice mock interviews.

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: If medicine is your passion, do not let anything get in the way of it. Push through the undergraduate hardships, the MCAT, and the application process.

During the undergraduate career, surround yourself with people that want you to succeed. If you are surrounded by competitive people, it can be a motivation but it can easily become toxic. Have a good relationship with your professors. At some point you are going to need recommendation letters and if they can genuinely advocate for you, it will make your application stronger.

MCAT—first things first, take a practice exam! Often, we want to see a good score and wait until we are “ready” to take the practice exam. Realistically, you are not going to be ready ntil you experience it (type of questions, material, the 7 hours). Review the material you were the weakest on and work from there.

Application Process—Do not wait to apply until you have a perfect application. Like the MCAT, you may never be truly ready to apply, so just go for it. Make sure different people review your personal statement and work/activities descriptions. For this particular setion, make sure you are selecting meaningful experiences because you should be ready to talk about them during interviews. They prefer quality over quantity. Once you submit your primary application, begin working on your secondary applications. The prompts often repeat themselves so you can begin rough drafts before they release them. In my opinio, this was the most tedious part of the application process, so be ready and work smart.

Best of luck to all future applicants!

 


 

Headshot: Marie MazzeoName: Marie T. Mazzeo

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Certificate in Public Policy

Overall GPA: 4.0

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2019

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: NYU Grossman School of Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: I am drawn to a career as a physician because I hope to work at the intersection of science, health, education, and research. I am particularly interested in working with underserved communities and would like to be part of a multidisciplinary effort to improve human health at the individual level while also contributing to the advancement of public health at the global level.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A:Peer Health Exchange, Laboratory Research, Clinical Research, Domestic and International Community Service, Scholars Cohorts, Social Organizations, Mentorship Programs, Physician Shadowing and Athletics.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: I tried to spend a least a few hours every day reviewing material, and increased my amount of studying based on my exam schedule. I'm not a fan of cramming for exams or pulling “all nighters”!

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: The most useful resources I used for the MCAT were: all of the AAMC materials, ExamKrackers Review Books, Tests, and 101 Passages, CARS, Altius Prep 10 Test Bundle, Jack Westin Daily CARS Practice, and the Khan Academy PsychSoc 100-page summary available on Reddit.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I wanted to expand upon my research skills and to use the year to explore an area of science that I found particularly interesting. I believe that there is a tremendous benefit to having and “application year,” however, it is not absolutely necessary, nor is it right for everyone.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: I think my strengths were my longitudinal and in-depth involvement in my extracurricular activities, my GPA, and my MCAT score. I also believe that forming lasting relationships with my professors and mentors was a tremendous asset, both personally and professionally.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A:Yes (MD).

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Pre-Health Advising Office was indispensable in my application to medical school. The members of this office were especially helpful in reviewing my personal statement, work/activities descriptions, and secondary application essays. They were also an incredible source for support for practicing mock, traditional, and MMI interviews. I definitely would not be where I am today if it wasn't for them!

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: Plan ahead and have a solid support system. Applying to medical school is a daunting process, so it is important to do your part so that you are as prepared and informed as possible. Certain aspects of this process seem like they are designed to make you question yourself and your abilities; however, please remember that you are amazing and that you have accomplished so much more than you recognize. (It is such a privilege to even have the opportunity to apply to medical school!) Take time to self-reflect on what you have learned from your past activities and experiences, and to contemplate what you would like to accomplish in the future. Try not to worry about what other people are doing or what they have accomplished—be yourself and your own story! During this time, it is very important to prioritize your well-being, and to spend quality time with friends and family. You got this!

 


 

Headshot: Norine ChanName: Norine Chan

Major: Biochemistry

Minor: Certificate in Public Policy

Overall GPA: 4.0

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2019

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: Duke University School of Medicine

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: I was drawn to medicine for its unique ability to integrate scientific problem solving, creative thinking, and social responsibility in one profession. Medicine provides the opportunity to communicate with people; discover the circumstances causing their pain, discomfort, or disease; and use this knowledge to advocate for and provide necessary care to patients. This is a privileged position that exemplifies the type of connection I wish to have with people in my career—and maintains my interest in and excitement about the field of medicine.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Hunter College Fencing Team, Peer Health Exchange, Mount Sinai Hospital CARE Volunteer, Mount Sinai Research Associate, Weill Cornell Heart-to-Heart Outreach Program, Visual Psychophysiology Research Assistant, Molecular Pathology Research Assistant, McNulty Scholars Program, Brooklyn Hospital Center Volunteer, Global Health Brigades.

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: 30-35 hours per week.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: Examkrackers 3-month spring course

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: Yes, I took two gap years. My first gap year was spent living abroad in Taiwan and working as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant. I wanted to take the time and opportunity to grow as an individual after graduation, to reconnect with my cultural and ethnic roots in Asia, and to experience life in a different country. During my second gap year I focused on my medical school applications and interviews; during this time, I worked as a medical scribe and medical assistant to obtain experience in the emergency department setting, observe the styles of various attending physicians, and build a foundation in patient interaction and writing a comprehensive patient chart.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: My application has a strong and consistent internal narrative that is present throughout the personal statement, my descriptions of extracurriculars and most meaningful experiences, and my secondary application essays. I focused primarily on telling my story and reflecting on my reasons for pursuing medicine, which I believe infused my application with humanity and honesty. I also take great pride and care in my writing and consider my writing style and attention to detail to be contributory factors to the strength of my application.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: Yes, I applied to a variety of schools in different states along the East Coast of the United States.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: The Hunter Pre-Health Advising Office was incredibly supportive and present throughout the application process. Starting the Committee Letter application process early helped me organize my thoughts and write about my experiences in a way that made tackling the AMCAS application far less intimidating when it came time to start. Kemile's willingness to read over and provide feedback on several iterations of my personal statement and secondary essays allowed me to constantly make improvements to my writing and gave perspective to my experiences. Especially when I was writing my application from thousands of miles away in Taiwan, being able to schedule calls with Kemile despite the time difference helped me to stay focused and committed to the process ahead of me. When it came to interview preparation, Veronica was an absolute joy to practice interview skills with and, particularly with MMI preparation, she took the extra step to research the process extensively and make the mock interview prompts as realistic as possible. The thoughtful conversations I had with her allowed me to enter my first few interviews with a sense of confidence and calm that only improved with further practice. I would not be where I am today without the encouragement, advice, and genuine care of the Pre-Health Advising Office!

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: The path to medical school and to becoming a successful physician is a long-term commitment; it is a marathon that does not begin and end with just this application process. Practice patience and cultivate endurance as much as possible. Be kind to yourself, share your successes and failures with your loved ones, and find activities outside of medicine that will develop your humanity—these are what will keep you sane throughout the application process and your career in medicine. Always start early when you can (i.e. try to submit your primary close to the AMCAS opening date and keep your turnaround time on secondaries to 2 weeks or less) and give yourself time to address errors, misunderstandings, and the inevitable unfortunate situations that will be outside of your control. Applying to medical school is an extensive, arduous process—treat it as a learning experience, avoid comparing yourself to others in the process, and stay confident that you are a worthy applicant. Best of luck!

 


 

 Tamir PinhasovName: Tamir Pinhasov

Major: Mathematics, Macaulay Honors Major

Minor: Chemistry

Overall GPA: 3.98

Graduation Year: 2019

Matriculation Year: 2019

Q: Which school are you attending?
A: The Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: The way I see it, studying and practicing medicine allows one to satisfy the craving for scientific curiosity and exploration, and at the same time have the ability to guide patients on a path to health and longevity by teaching them about the world around them and the world that exists within each of our bodies. This is the aspect of medicine that I find unique and rewarding.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Research: 1) Chemistry Lab at Queens College; 2) Biology Lab at City College; and 3) Sinai Research Associate

Mount Sinai Hospital ED C.A.R.E Volunteer

Shadowing: 1) Emergency Medicine Physicians at Mt. Sinai; and 2) Local Pediatrician

Community Service/Leadership: 1) Founder of BRIDGE Program at Jewish Institute of Queens—Exposing young children in religious environment to scientific experiments; 2) Founder of College Insider at FHHS—Helping students with their college applications; 3) Senior Legacy Committee at Hunter, and 4) Pre-Health Mentoring Initiative at Hunter

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A: Outside of going to classes, ~10 hours per week for science courses; 1-5 hours for other courses

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A: No, I self-studied. I think anyone who has good study habits and discipline can self-study and do well!

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: No.

Q: What do you consider to be your strengths in your application?
A: Aside from having solid extracurriculars, a definite strength of my application are my GPA and MCAT score. When I got a 509 on my first MCAT exam, I knew I had it in me to score higher. I studied harder and more diligently for the second time and scored a 519. My MCAT score jump was a big topic of discussion in my interviews and med schools seemed to like it. However, it's important to remember that GPA + MCAT only get you through the door. Your extracurriculars and your letters of recommendation take you the rest of the way.

Q: Did you apply nationally?
A: I applied mostly in the Northeast area. I did apply to 20 schools, though.

Q: How did Pre-Health Advising Office help you achieve your goals?
A: Since the first day, Kemile made sure that I was on the right track with volunteering, research etc. For example, I started my volunteering at Sinai in my freshman year because of the workshop that the prehealth office held that introduced us to this volunteering opportunity. I always felt that I could come in and talk to any of the advisors about any question or concern that I had. Additionally, Nina and Veronica helped me tremendously with my application (essay, secondaries, mock interviews, etc.).

Q: What advice do you have for others?
A: It's never too early to get involved in extracurriculars. You don't want to have to do volunteering, research, shadowing, etc. all at once in your fourth year or in your gap year.

It's easier to maintain a high GPA than to start off rough and have to work your way back up.

Try to retain as much information as possible from your science classes, as this information WILL show up again on your MCAT.

It’s never too early to start accumulating letters of recommendation from your professors into your prehealth file. It's a lot tougher to ask for a letter a few semesters later (when the professor doesn't remember you as well)

Avoid burning yourself out by living a balanced life, exercising, and having good friendships/support system!

 


 

Headshot: Heba ShaabanName: Heba Shaaban

Major: Anthropology and Biochemistry

Minor: N/A

Overall GPA: 3.89

Graduation Year: 2018

Matriculation Year: 2019


Q: Which school are you attending?

A: Weill Cornell Medicine.

Q: What drew you to this particular health field?
A: My fascination with the meticulous design of the human body and my love of science, along with my desire to be of help to the ill, are all reasons I decided to pursue medicine.

Q: What extracurriculars did you participate in?
A: Metagenomics research at WCM; Biochemistry and organic chemistry adjunct lecturer at Hunter College; Chemical education research at Hunter College; Volunteer at Methodist and NYU Langone hospitals; Shadowing physicians in the ER and in clinics; Student government rep at Macaulay Honors College; President of Macaulay Pre-health Professions Club; Studied sociology abroad in Florence, Italy

Q: How many hours on average did you spend studying for your courses per week?
A:15-20 hours.

Q: Did you use a test prep course?
A:Yes—but in retrospect, I think I shouldn't have. Self-studying would've been best.

Q: Did you take a GAP year? If so, why?
A: YES!! Best decision I've ever made! Highly recommend. Undergrad, MCAT, and the application are all very exhausting and lead to burnout. A year off to reset, travel, or get a full-time job are all great reasons to take a gap year. It also helps build discipline, maturity, and character.

Sours: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/prehealth/successful-applicant-profiles

In an era of fake news and an explosion of opinions on social media, you may have heard the term “confirmation bias” before. If not, it’s pretty simple - it means we tend to seek out and believe information that reinforces our pre-existing opinions.

You might think that you’re above this kind of mental lapse, that you always see things objectively and logically, but you’d be wrong.

And it’s not your fault. There are many pre-med myths and misconceptions that are perpetuated by the hivemind, a mob mentality that arises from internet hearsay and a fear of missing out (FOMO, as the kids call it).

Whether it’s online through forums like Student Doctor Network (SDN) or reddit, you are constantly inundated with advice (both wanted and unwanted), and it’s tempting to take whatever advice sounds good or most convenient for you.

Why? It’s becausethese mythsare an easy escape from the truth, a way to avoid deeper and more critical thinking. They often play off our basest fears, instincts, or first impressions. They typically break things down into deceptive black-and-white dichotomies, which are easier for our brain to process and therefore more attractive as ideas.

Since you’re dealing with such high stakes and steep competition, these forms of mental bargaining all the more alluring. Who doesn’t want an easy formula for success, a quick-fix catch-all solution? Be careful - buying into these myths could have negative effects on your admissions chances.

8 SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTHS THAT CAN KEEP YOU FROM GETTING IN

In some cases, we’ve paraphrased actual comments from these online forums (see the italics below); others are derived from years of working with students who continuously cite these sources as the Gospel Truth of admissions.

Like wikipedia, these sources are a great place to start when doing research, but they can’t be viewed as the end-all-be-all. Here’s why:

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #1 - THE FALSE CAUSE

“My cousin volunteered with Alzheimer’s patients and did three years of research, and he got interviews with dozens of medical schools. If it worked for him, it’ll work for me.”

This monkey-see-monkey-do myth can be useful at times (line dancing, for example), but your medical school application is far too personalized for such a one-size-fits-all approach.

Sure, that formula of activities worked for your cousin, one person, but there were many other factors at play (his background, GPA, MCAT, overall time commitments and responsibilities, etc.) that affected his success. Attributing it to his volunteer capacity and amount of research alone is a False Cause myth, since you’re creating a correlation that is built on a limited and short-sighted premise.

You might follow the same path and wind up miserable and overworked, without much to make you stand out. Do not jump to conclusions about causality or you’ll wind up a casualty.

For a healthier approach to your application, click here to find out what really separates the typical from stand-out pre-meds.

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #2 - SLIPPERY SLOPE (OR HASTY GENERALIZATION)

“You don’t want to major in anthropology. The admissions committees will think you want to be Indiana Jones or something. You’ll never get in.”

Spend enough time online, and you’re sure to find some trollish voice condemning another pre-med to rejection hell.

It’s usually something relatively minor, like getting a C in freshman biology or taking science courses at a community college. Maybe even choosing a non-science major. But the trolls are hasty in their generalizations, letting small things snowball, claiming others will never get into medical school due to X, Y, or Z reason.

That’s where the Slippery Slope myth ends for most pre-meds - rejection - not getting in. When voices are telling you that something always or never leads to rejection, speaking in such certain extremes, it’s hard not to listen. The Slippery Slope or Hasty Generalization myth makes a haphazard leap in logic which plays off our fears.

In some cases, certain factors will prevent you from getting in, but majoring in anthro is not one of them. Neither is getting a C in freshman bio. Small blips can be compensated for, and many academic paths can lead to pre-med success.

Don’t give into the snowball myth of the Slippery Slope!

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #3 - THE GAMBLER’S FALLACY

“If I apply to 25 MD schools and 25 DO schools all over the country, one of them is bound to give me an interview, right?”

Playing the numbers game to the extreme relies on flawed logic. Apply broadly all across the country, cast the widest net possible, and your chances of getting an interview will go up!

Not exactly. You can’t compensate for iffy stats, limited clinical experience, and typical background by maximizing the amount of applications you submit. If anything, the cumbersome amount of work you’ll be doing to complete the applications will be a detriment to their quality.

Should you apply to 68 medical schools? Only if you want to go insane.

Every school gets the same primary application, transcripts, letter of recommendation, etc. from you, and they all receive fairly similar secondaries about your life and experiences. So for the most part, with some exceptions (in-state vs. out-of-state, for example) your odds with each application are relatively the same every time.

But you won’t even be getting the benefit of the 50/50 coin flip. More likely, you’ll just be eating massive application fees and ending up in the application slush piles.

Sure, there are stories of pre-meds who have miraculously pulled off this numbers-game approach, but that’s the same as people winning the lotto or beating the house at a casino. They’re the anomaly that helps to feed the myth. You’ll find far more people with crumpled lotto tickets and empty pockets.

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #4 - SUNK COSTS

“I know my scores aren’t great, but I’ve already worked so hard and invested so much time; wouldn’t it be a waste not to apply and see what happens?”

We all know this feeling. We’ve invested ourselves into something and we want to see it through. For me, this is my growing collection of stories and poems that have unraveled into the “Outtakes” folder on my computer. Most of the time, it’s good to finish what you’ve started, BUT not at the expense of your long-term success.

That’s how the Sunk Costs myth operates. It tricks you into the idea of feeling “pot-committed” - or obligated to finish something - strictly due to the energy previously spent.

This myth can rear its ugly head in many scenarios for pre-meds - lingering in impossibly hard classes until it’s too late to drop them without penalty, clinging to countless fringe roles in a slew of half-hearted extracurriculars, settling for a biology major after a year of classes instead of pursuing something more personally stimulating.

More specifically, let’s say you stick around in a research position that you find unfulfilling, simply from fear of being labeled a “quitter.” Great, you save some element of pride, but you’re unlikely to end up with any inspiring stories, tangible results, or pending publications. Check out our 3 signs it’s time to quit your research position for more insights.

Don’t be fooled into feeling pot-committed - in the end, that’s usually just an excuse to do what’s more passive and comfortable!  

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #5 - THE APPEAL TO AUTHORITY

“My advisor at the NIH says that you should never open your personal statement with a story because admissions officers just want you to get to the point.”

The Appeal to Authority myth is particularly hard to shake. We’re taught from a young age to listen to our elders and heed the wisdom of those with more experience. As a pre-med, you should recognize how much of a novice you are in the grand scheme, but you shouldn’t blindly follow advice from someone just because they’re on a higher rung of the ladder than you.

In the example above, the candidate is putting a lot of stock into the advice from his superior at the NIH. And why shouldn’t he listen to one of the higher-ups at the National Institute of Health?

Well, for one thing, the NIH has nothing to do with admissions and no authority over what constitutes good personal non-fiction for your essays. If the supervisor had given you advice on finding research opportunities, then it wouldn’t be a myth - the advice would have legitimate ethos and credibility.  

We make this mistake all the time. When we feel like people are smarter than us, we tend to take their words as objective truth, whether or not they have any specific expertise on the topic. It dates all the way back to agreeing with our parents that babies come from storks, and this tempting mental shortcut never goes away completely.

Moral of the story - take all advice with a grain of salt (even mine) and examine it critically. Consider the sources of information and the expertise behind them, and never lose your healthy sense of skepticism!

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #6 - THE APPEAL TO PITY

“I was waitlisted at XYZ Medical School, but it’s totally unfair! I was sick with the flu and moving apartments, but they still didn’t let me reschedule my interview date. Plus I had to travel across the country, only to be grilled about my out-of-state status. My interviewer was so awkward! I just know they didn’t get the best version of me - do you think it would help if I sent an update letter explaining why I screwed up my interview?”

Think about all those advertisements you see on TV with sad dogs in cages, encouraging you to donate money to such-and-such charity. I’m all about helping dogs, but those nonprofits are clearly pulling at your heartstrings to sell you on their message.

Appeals to Pity (guilt tripping) are ineffective when they stand on their own. That’s why there are three points to the rhetorical triangle. Pathos (emotion) can be very convincing, but it needs logos (logic) and ethos (credibility) for it to be a sound argument.

The pre-med Appeals to Pity happen most often when students write disadvantaged essays or essays about institutional action.

We’ve written about how to piss off your medical school admissions reader, and one of the big takeaways from that article is that you shouldn’t make excuses or pull cards that you don’t have. Candidates sometimes take this route when they feel desperate or out of options, but it’s likely to further undermine your chances.

This is NOT to say that disadvantaged candidates don’t face significant challenges, or that emotional and mental health aren’t valid. ‘Do no harm’ includes your own self-care. The point is that there’s a clear line between legitimate disadvantage and fabricated sob story. If you let the facts of your circumstances speak for themselves and don’t editorialize, you can achieve the pathos you want while also maintaining a sound argument.  

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #7 - FALSE DICHOTOMY

“If you’re lucky, you’ll sneak your way into a few lower-tier MD schools. Maybe then you can swing a surgery residency. But if you only get into DO schools, forget about your dreams of being a surgeon. You’ll just wind up in primary care.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald said that “the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.” He’s right, but our brains don’t like to operate that way; we like to see things in clear-cut, black-or-white dichotomies because they’re easier to process and seem more reliable.

As illustrated in the italics above, a good pre-med example of the False Dichotomy myth is the belief that DO programs will determine your range of future specialties. In essence, it’s MD or bust in some people’s minds when it comes to competitive specialties like surgery. This notion might lead you to believe that DOs exclusively fill primary care specialties, with no grey areas or exceptions in between.

Do MDs really have more success than DOs in residency applications? The verdict is that both types of programs can get you into residency programs, no matter their ranking. Sure, MD programs might help you slightly for more competitive specialties, but looking at it in such an all-or-nothing way is reductive.

Too much thinking in this mindset will cause you to avoid diversification or risk-taking in your application. In turn, this will lead you towards a safe, generic application that comes across rather one-note to admissions committees.

We encourage you to bend conventions and plot your journey in your own distinct way, free of the false dichotomies placed on you.

In other words, we want you to be pre-med while still being yourself!

SDN MEDICAL SCHOOL MYTH #8 - THE GOLDEN TICKET

“All I need is a publication in JAMA and a letter from the XYZ Medical School dean, and I’ll be a shoe-in anywhere. It’s practically automatic at that point.”

In Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Willy Wonka prints a handful of golden tickets inside his chocolate bars, dispersed randomly across the globe, giving recipients a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to tour his factory.

It was that simple in the book; if you had a ticket, you got to enter. And that’s how the Golden Ticket myth tricks you. It deceives you into believing there’s a secret, hidden method or formula that will guarantee success. If you have X, or if you can get Y position, you’ll be irresistible to every medical school you apply to. It’s at the heart of the easy thinking that plagues all the myths on this list.

The Golden Ticket myth partly arises from our inability to distinguish the part from the whole (i.e. it was X reason why I did or didn’t get in, rather than a bevy of factors weighed holistically). It also stems from our inability to accept the concepts of luck, chance, and all the small aspects that are out of our control.

This myth has us clamoring for a guaranteed solution, perhaps to absurd lengths, but that solution will always remain elusive… because it doesn’t exist.

There is no surefire, foolproof method when it comes to medical school admissions, or life in general. It’s not the “what” of your application that will get you into medical school; it’s the “how.” And how you present your application will depend on your experiences, personality, writing style, school selection, etc.

You won’t find a secret formula for admission, so your best bet is to complete an application that’s authentically the best representation of yourself as an individual. Focus on YOUR strengths, YOUR stand-out experiences, and YOUR potential contributions to the field. They’re your real golden ticket.

No matter where you’re at in the admissions process, make sure to heed this advice and stay clear of the myths that pervade the online forums. Don’t hurt your odds! Keep an open, objective mind and make Fitzgerald proud!

Sours: https://www.savvypremed.com/blog/8-sdn-medical-school-myths-that-can-keep-you-from-getting-in
  1. Generation of miracles
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MD Admission FAQ

General Questions

Applying to Emory

International Students

After Applying to Emory

Financial Aid

Already in Medical School


General Questions

 

What's new in Admissions given the CoVID - 19 pandemic and quarantine?

In this time of uncertainty, we realize that many of you may need to reschedule your MCAT exams, adjust your course plan, and/or cancel clinical experiences. Some of you--or your loved ones--will be personally affected by this global pandemic. Our Admissions Committee assures you that these unforeseen circumstances will be understood in the context of the current situation. We will accept pass/fail courses, as well as online courses, toward our course requirements.  For the time being, our application deadlines and MCAT minimum scores remain the same for the 2020-2021 application cycle. We will accept MCAT results through October 31, 2020.

During the 2020-21 application cycle, all interviews will be conducted remotely.

Should any of this change, we will post notices here on our website. Please stay safe and healthy.

Can I schedule an appointment with an admissions counselor?

Unfortunately, we do not have admissions counselors or advisors. All the information you need to know about applying to Emory School of Medicine is included on this website. If, after reviewing the information on this website, you still have questions, you may call the Office of Admissions at 404-727-5660. Here are some of the basics:

In order to meet Emory course requirements, you will need to complete at least four full years, with labs, in the basic sciences (one year in each of the following areas: biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics). We expect medical school students to have a sound knowledge in these areas, prior to attending medical school.

For the class that began medical school in 2019, the average MCAT score was 514 (approx. the 90th percentile). The average GPA was 3.7. Emory received over 11,000 applications last year for its incoming class of 138 students, so you’ll need to be competitive in order to be invited for an interview.

Another important thing to keep in mind is that the application “season” begins 14 months prior to each year’s fall semester, so be sure to plan ahead. Applications are submitted online via the American Medical College Application System (AMCAS), beginning in May (for application to the fall of the following year).

You may also find it helpful to meet with your pre-medical advisor at your college or university for assistance applying to medical school.

What courses should I be taking to prepare for medical school?

In this time of uncertainty, our Admissions Committee assures you that unforeseen academic circumstances will be understood in the context of the current situation. We will accept pass/fail courses, as well as online courses, toward the following course requirements.

In order to meet Emory course requirements, you will need to complete at least four full years (eight semesters) with labs, in the basic sciences (one year in each of the following areas: biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics). We expect medical school students to have a sound knowledge in these areas, prior to attending medical school.

You will also need to complete six semester hours of English (a full year of college-level grammar and composition). If you feel that your coursework in other areas would fulfill this requirement, you will be given an opportunity in the Emory Supplemental Application to explain. This does not guarantee that an exception will granted. The final decision rests with the Admissions Committee. Exceptions are made for individuals with very high grades or for those who demonstrate grammar and composition aptitude in other areas (MCAT scores, thesis work, publication of research/articles, etc.).

Lastly, you will need to complete at least 18 hours of coursework in the Humanities and Social Sciences. 

 Examples of courses that meet this requirement include:

  • Anthropology
  • Art/Art Appreciation/Art History
  • Black Studies/African American Studies
  • Classical Studies
  • Economics
  • Foreign Languages
  • History
  • Journalism
  • Literature
  • Music/Music Appreciation
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religion
  • Sociology
  • Theater/Film Studies
  • Women’s Studies

Course requirements are listed above in semester hours. If your school operates on academic quarters, the requirement for the sciences is equivalent to one year, or three quarters, in each of the sciences. For the humanities, we require nine quarter-long courses in humanities and/or social sciences. 

Do I have to be a pre-med major to apply to Emory?

You do not have to be a pre-med or biology major to apply to Emory. Every year, we admit students with non-science majors. The most important consideration is that you meet the course requirements, including four full years in the sciences (see question above for complete list of course requirements).

Does it matter where I go to college?

Emory accepts students from state schools, as well as private schools. We do not consider students from any particular college or university to be more prepared for medical school than others, although we do recognize that some schools are more academically rigorous than others. What you do and accomplish during your undergraduate career speaks more highly of your preparation for medical school, than does a degree from a particular institution.

If your undergraduate degree is from a college or university in the United States or Canada, the college or university must be regionally accredited in order for you to qualify for admission to Emory. For a list of accredited schools, please visit the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. Look for their “Regional Accrediting Organizations.”

What if I've been out of college for a while?

Over 60% of last year’s class had taken a year or more “off” after college. Some took full-time jobs, some did overseas volunteer work, others pursued their interests outside of medicine. We do not consider this a disadvantage.

Some applicants feel that they need to take a few post-graduate science courses to strengthen/refresh their knowledge in the sciences. This is not required, but consider that you will need to be able to submit strong, recent MCAT scores (taken within four years of matriculation) in order to be competitive.

Does Emory have a post-baccalaureate program to prepare students for medical school?

Emory does not have a post-baccalaureate program designed to prepare students for medical school; however, you may qualify for admission through the Laney Graduate School as a Student in Special Standing (non-degree seeking student) if you would like to take an undergraduate science course or courses. For more information about registering for courses via the Student in Special Standing Status at the Laney Graduate School of Emory University

Where can I learn more about other healthcare professional programs at Emory?

Visit our programs section for more information about the following programs:

  • Doctor of Physical Therapy
  • Master of Medical Science in Anesthesiology
  • Master of Medical Science Genetic Counseling
  • Master of Medical Science Physician Assistant
  • Bachelor of Medical Science Medical Imaging

 


Applying to Emory

How do I apply to Emory School of Medicine?

The application process begins about 14 months prior to each year’s fall semester.

Applications to most medical schools, including Emory, are submitted online with the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). The application season begins in early May of each year (for admission to the fall semester of the following year). The deadline to apply through AMCAS is October 15. American Medical College Application Service.

Part of your AMCAS application will include the selection of all the medical schools to which you wish to apply. If you select Emory as one of your choices, AMCAS will send your verified information to us.

For the 2021-22 Application Cycle, Emory will prescreen for minimum MCAT scores.  Emory will prescreen for a minimum MCAT score of 500 with at least a 123 in each of the four subtests. Applicants with an MCAT total score of less than 500, or a subtest score of less than 123 on any of the four MCAT subtests will not receive an invitation to complete an Emory Supplemental Application. If an applicant has more than one MCAT score, the latest score will be used to determine eligibility. In order to receive the Emory Supplemental Application, an applicant must have taken the MCAT no more than 3 times. An applicant who has taken the MCAT 4 or more times will not receive an Emory Supplemental Application

Once your verified application is received at Emory (and your application meets our prescreening criteria), you will receive an email from the Office of Admissions providing access to Emory’s online Supplemental Application.

Applicants will be required to submit a headshot photo and application fee with their online Emory Supplemental Application. The deadline to submit the Supplemental Application is December 1.

You may also find help with the medical school application process by contacting your Pre-Health or Pre-Medical Advisor at your school’s academic advising office.

Can you send me an application?

We no longer mail out or accept paper applications. All applications are submitted online (see question above for more details about the application process).

How many letters of recommendation do I need?

Applicants are required to submit either:

  1. One letter or letter packet from a Pre-Health or Pre-Medical Committee; or,
  2. Three letters from individuals, two of whom should be your professors or others familiar with your knowledge in the sciences

We strongly suggest you submit two letters from professors who taught you in the hard sciences (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) in your undergraduate or post-baccalaureate education or from someone familiar with your research and knowledge in the sciences.

If you are unable to submit letters from two science professors, you may substitute letters from other educators, advisors, or employers, but keep in mind that Emory is an extremely competitive school. The Admissions Committee will look for applicants who demonstrate a sound knowledge in the hard sciences, prior to attending medical school, and are able to provide recommendation letters to attest to that knowledge.

Sours: https://med.emory.edu/education/programs/md/admissions/faq.html

Moving Forward with Student Doctor Network and Its Founder


Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts

Session 307

Dr. Lee Burnett founded Student Doctor Network or SDN to connect students. Little did he know how big it would get, and how negative the internet would turn. He’s hoping to change that.

I’ve been doing this podcast for six years now. I actually started this podcast back in 2012 after I realized that there wasn’t good enough positive information out there. Particularly, SDN had a ton of negative information. And I talked a lot about that site. In fact, I have actively discouraged students from using that site.

Previously, I reached out to them and met with the founder, as well as the people running it day in and day out. I initially didn’t get any positive reception from them. Until recently, Lee reached out to me and expressed his interest in collaborating with me in some way to figure out how we can move things forward.

I was very happy hearing from him considering how SDN is a very big site and students are finding it and using it. While I’m just a small piece in this premed puzzle and I can’t shepherd everybody away from SDN. But if we can work together and make SDN a better place for you, then I’m all for it.

[Tweet “”Collaboration, not competition, is key to our success.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

[04:25] Lee’s Interest in Becoming a Physician

Lee recalls being told by his mom when he was in high school back in the 80s to pick a profession he wanted. And being a doctor was what appealed to him. His dad worked for the State of California while his mom worked for a nonprofit organization. And both ended up working together to help promote family medicine in California. So it was natural for him as he got to meet the doctors his parents were working with who were all residency program directors.

Following college, he went into an osteopathic medical school in California. After he graduated, he did a year of DO program, specifically unopposed residency program in internal medicine and surgery. Then he finished the next two years in family medicine at UC Irvine. By unopposed, it means there are no other residency programs that are competing for patients at whatever facility you’re at. So the whole clinic or facility is just for a specific residency program. Hence, he got to see everything, which something he recommends to students as he might not have had the same opportunity from other programs otherwise. Aside from such program, UC Irvine also had a local community hospital, which they got to do rotations at as well as in UC-Irvine in Orange, CA.

[Tweet “”It’s very important when you’re in primary care to try to find a program that is unopposed meaning there are no other residency programs that are competing for patients at whatever facility you’re at.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

[09:08] Location as a Deciding Factor and an F in Genetics

Born and raised in California, Lee wanted to stay there. He went to UC Davis for undergrad, had a good Science GPA, but got some really bad advice. In fact, it was what led him down the road to eventually create Student Doctor Network.

At that time, he was struggling with Genetics and decided to drop out of the class so he got an F. The advice he got from other people was not to worry about an F as they’re going to drop it from the GPA calculation and could just retake it and get an A and everything is going to be fine. Of course, that was a terrible advice.

So his GPA and MCAT scores were pretty good but not good enough to get into a UC program. Consequently, he got advice to look to DO schools. He wasn’t aware of it and so he tried to research it. But understand this was before the internet days so there wasn’t much information out there. He went to the school and took a look at it and thought it was legit with a solid core program. He also saw that their graduates had very good residency slots. Hence, he went with such school, especially knowing he would stay in CA and had a good primary care program.

[12:15] Osteopathic Manipulative Technique (OMT) in Practice

Lee admits to not doing OMT in his practice. He thinks it’s great but it’s something you have to do constantly.

[Tweet “”You always have to be practicing to maintain your skills and if you don’t continuously practice it, then you’re going to lose it.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

When he went into his own practice back in 2000, he just didn’t put the effort into continuing to maintain the skill. And it was something he actually regrets. He currently works full-time with the army. When he was working with pilots, they didn’t want to take any medication otherwise it grounds them so they really want osteopathic manipulation as they could feel good without taking any medicine. So a good DO who keeps on top of their OMT schools can really do absolute magic.

[13:45] Getting Into the Military and Watching the Saddam Trial

Back during his residency in Downey as an intern, he considered himself dirt poor and buried in student loans and car payment. He was having a hard time making ends meet. Then he got recruited and in return, he had to give a certain number of years back once graduating from residency. While in residency, you don’t have to serve any time at all. To him, this sounded like a pretty good deal. He got to serve the military while getting some financial help which he desperately needed. So he got money for the next three years of his residency. And when he graduated in 2000, he owed two years in the reserves for every one year he took a paycheck from the army, 6 years in total.

After 9/11, everything in the military just completely changed. The reserves had a large chunk of army’s medical capability so physicians were being deployed on a fairly routine basis. Instead of getting deployed in Iraq, they ended up sitting at Fort Lewis, WA. Following that, he went back to his practice in CA. He then decided to finish his six years until he got called up again in 2005 for a routine rotation and served at a combat hospital in Iraq for four months. Plus, he got to watch the Saddam trial and being the physician there in case something happened. Because of this, he considered staying in the army for longer. And ultimately, it was something he wanted and decided to do it full-time, being able to make a huge difference serving the country taking care of soldiers and their families versus treating patients back home. So in 2009, he went full-time with the Army Reserves in North Carolina and in 2011, an active component and ultimately volunteered in the Air Force infantry division for two years. Then he spent a year in Kansas and four years in Korea. Now, he’s in Fort Brooke, Louisiana serving at a combat support hospital.

[Tweet “”That was really something to be there and watch history in front of you, not be a part of it, but just watch it.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

[23:10] From a Need for Money to Finding His Calling in Life

What Lee appreciates as a physician is it’s a single healthcare system. Having to deal with different insurers, you can’t order some of the tests you had to order, it could be frustrating. Not to mention all the amount of paperwork and effort, it would just crush your soul. And he felt it got worse and worse every year he was in private practice.

But being in the military work with a single healthcare system, you can order what you need to order and get the medications you need to get. And Lee finds this to be very refreshing.

[24:24] The Impetus for Student Doctor Network

Back in 1993 as Lee started medical school, there were 17 osteopathic medical schools across the country. And they had no idea what issues these schools had. As he and his friend met people at conferences and other events, they decided to publish a newspaper, The Osteopathic Pulse in 1994. It had articles from each of the different osteopathic schools in the country and they distributed it for free to all the schools. Basically, it reached the first and second-year students since the third and fourth-year people were on rotation.

By 1996, they figured out how the internet worked and all those stuff. He learned how to do HTML programming and took all the articles from the newspaper and put them into the internet so the third and fourth-year people could see it online.

They also had a chatroom and a forum back in 1997-1998, where everytime you updated a page, it created a new page in and of itself. So there wasn’t any database. And everything just evolved from there.

By 1997 as he was graduating from medical school, they weren’t doing the newspaper anymore but he continued developing stuff on the internet. They sought to create quality content about other schools and interesting stuff. At that time, there were only 2-3 websites for medical students and dental students, whom he got together with online. They decided to create one thing for everybody, hence, they created the Student Doctor Network.

They weren’t that focused on the forum, but on everything else like how to get into medical school or dental school, articles, etc. So the forum was just an afterthought. But over time, in 2001-2002, the forum just got bigger and bigger (now with over 3,000 members), that people would now equate SDN to forums and not the other components of the site.

[Tweet “”It was the one place where people could go and get advice or do peer-to-peer support. It was a lot of fun. It was a meek community. And over the years, it just got bigger and bigger.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

As Lee mentioned earlier, this was born out of a crappy advice he got from other friends and over time, that kind of drove what they were doing in making sure they had good, reliable information, along with peer support through the forums.

[30:30] The Evolution of SDN

Lee describes how the internet has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. In the early days, they would just have 40 up to 200 people in the forum. It was quite slow. But it has changed the dynamics of how people relate to each other on the internet. Back in the days, people weren’t as jaded as they are now. It was a very positive community. But it has changed a lot over the years.

As to when he noticed this change from being collaborative to more of the trolling and heated flame wars, Lee would describe it like a boiling frog syndrome, where you just kind of sit there and not notice it. The culture changed gradually. It wasn’t like an overnight thing. But he didn’t see it until around 2008-2009. And he wasn’t quite sure whether it was related to the economy, generation shift, etc.

[Tweet “”People had the anonymity of the keyboard and gotten into bad places where they wouldn’t have gone had they not had that same level of anonymity.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

Additionally, he noticed that more people came on the internet and things became even more anonymous. People had the anonymity of the keyboard and gotten into bad places where they wouldn’t have gone had they not had that same level of anonymity.

At that time, SDN had old rules where that if users don’t want to be moderated, they’d just leave them alone. And if something really gets out of hand and they’ll go in there. But usually, the forums would take care of themselves. And it worked pretty well. Then again back in 2008-2010, they began to see a shift where self-regulation wasn’t happening as much anymore. And for some reason, people were no longer using the “report the post” button as much as Lee would have wanted. So in a way, it was like people just expected that behavior and tolerated it. And Lee admits he’s sad to see where they are as a whole as a nation and across the internet globally that they are having all this negative discourse so frequently in public forums. Presently, at SDN, they had changed their moderation over the past few years, from being hands off to really keeping a close eye on what people are saying. They’ve begun being aggressive in getting in and removing people who were being negative, trolling, etc. So they had to change the way they moderated.

[Tweet “”It’s sad to see where we are, as a whole, as a nation, or across the internet globally that we have such a negative discourse so frequently in public forums.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

Lee saddened by all the negativity right now but if they really wanted to provide free information to students and have a place for them to support each other, then they knew they wanted to provide that protective environment.

[36:25] A Little Back Story of How MSHQ Began

I started the Medical School Headquarters in 2012 for the reason Lee started SDN because of poor premed advising but also because SDN back then was the negative place for information. So when I started it, my goal was if I could take one person who goes on SDN and reads something or asks a question and gets answers back and think they can never become a physician and discouraged, I want to put out information to show them that they can no matter what, although it’s not going to be that easy and it may take longer.

So what has now become my life’s work was a result of the downturn of the forums in SDN and all the negativity that was around. So I’m thankful for SDN as I wouldn’t have been here if not for that loose moderation. It’s funny how all this have come full circle.

Lee adds that other forums have popped up over the next few years and branched out because they felt SDN was negative. To some degree, things were negative back in 2010. By taking SDN on a balance, Lee would beg to disagree that by and large, the information was very positive and people were very supportive.

He goes on to say that Reddit even has an interesting way of having this bias forum based on up and down votes, which SDN doesn’t have to prevent any bias. But human nature is that you’re going to lock on to those one or two negative posts out of the 20 positive ones. But they’ve been working with individuals who would give truthful advice in a way that doesn’t crush a soul and they’ve been doing this for the past couple of years.

[41:30] A Soul Crushing Example

One of my favorite threads on SDN was from a student I did some mock interviews with. The student got kicked out of his undergrad 20 years ago and finally realized he wanted to be a physician. After he got his acceptance to an allopathic medical school, he went to SDN for some reason and presented his stats and asked what he would do. The response would be that he’d have slim to none chance. But one response he got who was supposedly a faculty member, advised him not to go through this career path. So this was like the core of what SDN used to be.

So I raised the question to Lee whether this kind of reply would now be moderated. He explains that if the statement was honest and reasonable, then it would stay up. But if someone was trying to be a jerk and trying to crush somebody’s soul, then this would not be tolerated. Hence, it’s a case by case basis.

[44:00] Osteopathic Bashing

As an osteopath himself, Lee thinks that the bashing going on right now against osteopaths is because of insecurity. And people can get really fired up, even going back to the early days of SDN, that he even had to post telling them that regardless of them picking MD or DO, it really doesn’t matter. Just do whatever is right for you. We don’t need to have these MD vs DO discussions. They don’t provide any value. Lee says he never had a problem as a DO since graduating in residency. So he couldn’t really figure out why people have this kind of discussion at all.

[Tweet “”People don’t really care about what your degree is, what they care about is what their friends said about you.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

[47:05] The Future of SDN and How You Should Use the Forums

Lee reiterated that SDN was created to provide good quality information and to help students as they go through their journey from high school all the way to residency. It’s a nonprofit organization so they’re not getting any money from it. But they want to remain true to their mission of providing good quality content to help students make good decisions.

And so Lee reached out to me about a month ago in the hope of being able to work together, along with other organizations that provide good quality and free information to students.

Lee recommends to students trying to dip their toes into the SDN site, is that first, be open to what people are saying. But on the flip side, if somebody says something you don’t agree with, just ignore them and drive on.

Second, if you see something you think is inappropriate or condescending or just not a part of a community you don’t want to be a part of, then press that Report Post button. That way, the moderators can get in there and take care of it. They have about 60 moderators and there are millions of posts, so they can’t look over every single post everyday. So they’re relying on their community to give them a heads up when there’s something inappropriate.

[Tweet “”Take everything with a grain of salt and don’t engage with somebody and try to have a flame war. Just respectfully disagree. And if you see somebody being an absolute jerk, please report them so our moderators can get in there and take care of that.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

[51:00] More SDN Projects to Check Out!

Lee says that although the forums are the biggest part of the site now, his passion is really in creating all these other free areas such as the StudySchedule, that gives you free and customized study plan. Another is the Scutwork, where people get to post reviews of the different residency programs. Review2.com is another project where they’ve taken reviews from Yelp, Google, and their own database. So if you take the MCAT, PCAT, or DAT, simply pick up which exam to take, which center, state, city, and it will show you a compiled report of all the different reviews from previous test-takers. This way, people can make a decision whether they want to take that test in that particular center or not.

Interview Feedback is another one of the key components of the SDN site where students provide feedback on their interviews and school experiences to help other students.

LizzyM Score Calculator is a tool where you enter your numbers and it will generate which schools are in the zone you select. Then you’re provided with a list of schools you can look at.

Medical Specialty Selector is another tool that provides helps students find a residency match based on their interests, abilities, and personality.

The SDN Experts tab will let you post any question and their experts will respond. There’s also the Application Cost Calculator that gives does the calculation of what you might be spending and how much you need to budget for your medical school interviews.

[56:00] About the LizzyM Score

I believe there’s a huge pushback against things like LizzyM because it’s taking the “holistic” view out of the admissions process from a premed’s perspective. And the premed is told that information just based on stats. And the schools that may be a great fit for the student aren’t getting to see that student’s application because LizzyM said the student didn’t have a chance there.

Lee thinks this is a valid point. However, he adds that as long as medical schools continue to use systems that automatically screen people based on GPA and MCAT score, then LizzyM score is going to continue to be pretty valid. This is based on years of evidence. But that being said, Lee insists people should do what they want to do. It’s just an option they provide if you don’t have a lot of money and you can’t spread yourself across every single school application. So here’s where you’re going to be best targeting. So this is what it’s best used for.

[Tweet “”People should do what they want to do. This is not the AAMC telling somebody this is where you need to apply.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

[58:25] Final Words of Wisdom

Lee welcomes everyone to use the site. As a nonprofit organization, they’re completely free. It’s entirely supported by the ads you see on the site. Whether they have the forums or not, Lee says they’re there to help students achieve their dreams. Don’t get wrapped around the axle based on one or two posts that you see on an anonymous forum. Take it as a whole.

[Tweet “”Look at all the other resources that we offer and understand where you fit in that bigger picture.” https://medicalschoolhq.net/pmy-307-moving-forward-with-student-doctor-network-and-its-founder/”]

Links:

MedEd Media Network

Student Doctor Network

StudySchedule

Scutwork

Review2.com

Interview Feedback

LizzyM Score Calculator

Medical Specialty Selector

SDN Experts

Application Cost Calculator

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Sdn Interview Invite Tracker 2021

2020-2021 TMDSAS Rank List Thread. EthosEnergy is a leading provider of gas turbine, steam turbine, generator, compressor and transformer services. 2021-2022 Admission Timeline. Quillen Magazine Summer 2021 Issue. ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Close. Student Doctor Network. Created for students, by students to help build a diverse doctor workforce. Jun 29, 2021 · Download 32-bit font pack and spelling dictionary pack for Acrobat Reader DC. Medical schools have altered their applications, schedules, and dates due to COVID-19. Interview Feedback is the original databank of real interview questions from medical, dental, and other health professional schools. Official …. Now onward and upwards to the secondaries. Latest MCAT test date. Second Interview Invitation Email | Interview Invitation | @SMART HR Thanks for watching this video. Garret FitzGerald and the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics at the University of Pennsylvania cordially invite you to the 16th Annual ITMAT International Symposium, which will take place as a virtual and in-person event on Mon. Medical school factsheet - University of Michigan. Official Interview Invite Tracker 2020 2021 Student Doctor Network Communities. , the majority of candidates hear back from medical schools for interviews between October and January, but there’s variation even in that wide spread of time. SDN publishes new articles, interviews, podcasts, and features every weekday. Consistently ranked a top medical school for research, Washington University School of Medicine is also a catalyst in the St. The Ferrero Group has a strong global presence and Ferrero products are present and sold, directly or through authorised retailers, in more than 170 countries belonging to the entire international community. Student Doctor Network. 11 and Tues. Whether considering a gap year, struggling with the intensity of. ITU Digital World 2021. Thread of the Day l Just because someone else got an interview invite doesn't mean your application has been passed over or rejected l Pre-Medical Forum. virtual) Date heard from program: Rejection: Date heard from program: Waitlisted: Phase II Invite (Y/N and date) 3/19 Match Day: Write your name next to the site you matched to here!. Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs email) Interview dates (specify in-person vs. You may be invited to attend either a morning or afternoon session based on …. Interview Feedback is the original databank of real interview questions from medical, dental, and other health professional schools. com/album/id1482570099?ls=1&app=itunesStream on Apple Music -http://itunes. SDN Interview Question Databank. You can donate us to my channel growth and would like to. Complete July. Search admissions by MCAT, GPA, medical school, connect with fellow applicants, and track your applications online. An extensive and constantly increasing presence that attests to the quality of the products, the group's ability to adapt. Click to expand This is a tracker for dental schools!. if you have any questions. 2019-2020 Name & Fame | Name & Shame. In addition to the full-time faculty, a number of practicing physicians in the community participate in the educational process as both part-time and volunteer faculty. ITU Digital World 2021 opened on Wednesday 1 September, with sessions to follow every week until December. 99% bot availibility, without any lags to ensure you the best experience while using Invite Tracker. 5% Year Over Year in the Second Quarter of 2021, According to IDC. 2020-2021 Accepted Profiles. Submit as soon as possible so that you will have more time to gather the required supplemental …. Euclid Ave. ET : Medical schools begin uploading rising seniors. 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Jul 20, 2021 · Stephanie Feraday, President & CEO of aPriori, the leading provider of digital manufacturing simulation software, has been accepted into Forbes Technology Council, an invitation-only community for world-class CIOs, CTOs, and technology executives. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. ET : 2022 Match Registration opens. (Optional) IA: Interview Attendance date. He graduated from the New York Institute of Technology in 2000 and completed his residency …. In addition to the full-time faculty, a number of practicing physicians in the community participate in the educational process as both part-time and volunteer faculty. August 3 at 10:17 AM ·. 7% During the Second Quarter of 2021, According. My interview took place 30 July 2020, but there were two weeks of interviews before then, I believe. com/album/id1482570099?ls=1&app=itunesStream on Apple Music -http://itunes. (EST) Event Information This year we will be offering a virtual Preview Day open to anyone wanting to learn more about what OUWB can offer in regards to your medical education. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (MD) 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (DO) Post-II Acceptance Percentages. Medical schools have altered their applications, schedules, and dates due to COVID-19. Aug 19, 2021. Copy the previous posters list, unbold their …. Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Manitoba (Dec 1). 2019-2020 Med School Impressions Thread. Below are the links to the tracker from last year along with a few other helpful spreadsheets. government sponsored exchange visitor (J visa) applicants and their dependents are not required to pay application processing fees if participating in a Department of State, a U. Below are the links to the tracker from last year along with a few other helpful spreadsheets. SDN Interview Question Databank. 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Medical school factsheet - University of Michigan. The About pop-up window shows the product name, associated version string, and copyright message. Purchase on iTunes -http://itunes. 2019-2020 Med School Impressions Thread. Aug 19, 2021. Jul 20, 2021 · Stephanie Feraday, President & CEO of aPriori, the leading provider of digital manufacturing simulation software, has been accepted into Forbes Technology Council, an invitation-only community for world-class CIOs, CTOs, and technology executives. More from this Member | Report Response. The Stanford University Internal Medicine Residency program is designed to prepare you for any career in Internal Medicine. 2020 Medical School Application Changes Tracker. July 10, 2021. When you …. Whether considering a gap year, struggling with the intensity of. Johnathan Phi on Reddit-medical-school-interview-tracker Fix. Student Doctor Network. 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If you are considering the field, or currently studying public health, this webinar will help you understand what opportunities are available to you now, and after completing a master’s in public health! More information & to register 👇. Reddit premed why you need be careful official interview invite tracker 2020 how to ace medical school interviews reddit med school interview jobs. July 10, 2021. Worldwide Enterprise External OEM Storage Systems Market Revenue Increased 9. Euclid Ave. The PR visa does not make you a citizen of Canada; you are still a citizen of your native country. Also, there is only 1 dental class at the school and they have just started the PBL curriculum. Student Doctor Network. IDC Finds Growth in the Ethernet Switch Market and Slight Decline in the Router Market in Q2 2021. 2019-2020 Med School Impressions Thread. In addition to the full-time faculty, a number of practicing physicians in the community participate in the educational process as both part-time and volunteer faculty. Received an II from TTUHSC - El Paso on 1 July 2020. 2020-2021 interview and outcome tracker DO. Medical school factsheet - University of Michigan. The Student Doctor Network was founded by students in 1999 to help students become doctors. ET : Applicant Standard Registration Deadline for the Match and SOAP. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. My interview took place 30 July 2020, but there were two weeks of interviews before then, I believe. Forum list New posts How We Moderate Vision, Values and Policies New posts How We Moderate Vision, Values and Policies. Interview Feedback. Overall, in the U. An extensive and constantly increasing presence that attests to the quality of the products, the group's ability to adapt. May/June 2021: AMCAS opens for applicants to build their application and start submitting to schools: Mid-July: Earliest date to be invited to complete a Secondary …. Submit as soon as possible so that you will have more time to gather the required supplemental …. View details. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. If you are considering the field, or currently studying public health, this webinar will help you understand what …. (EST) Event Information This year we will be offering a virtual Preview Day open to anyone wanting to learn more about what OUWB can offer in regards to your medical education. SDN Interview Question Databank. Canadian Friendly American Medical Schools How To Get In Shemmassian Academic Consulting. Johnathan Phi on Reddit-medical-school-interview-tracker Fix. He graduated from the New York Institute of Technology in 2000 and completed his residency …. Student Doctor Network. Also, there is only 1 dental class at the school and they have just started the PBL curriculum. May 27, 2021: Earliest date for submission of application to the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). 2020-2021 interview and …. My interview took place 30 July …. Applications are reviewed in the late Summer after the following documentation is received: Completed ERAS Application Form; Residency Program Director’s Letter. No Medical School Interview Invites What You Can Do Next. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker. Current and previous interviews with practicing doctors across the health professions. Aug 06, 2021 · FERRERO GROUP. 11 and Tues. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. Jul 06, 2020 · Tracking your secondary applications. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. Johnathan Phi on Reddit-medical-school-interview-tracker Fix. The bulk of interview invites (“IIs”) go out between October and January. government sponsored exchange visitor (J visa) applicants and their dependents are not required to pay application processing fees if participating in a Department of State, a U. Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs email) Interview dates (specify in-person vs. Received an II from TAMU - COM on 8 July 2020. Pre-II rejection just now. ( $50 additional fee for late registration) Program quota change, program withdrawal, and program SOAP participation status. com/album/id/1482570099Stream on Spo. SDN Link: ***2021-2022 MD/PhD Interview Invites*** | Student Doctor Network Communities. Deadline to submit application to AMCAS and designate Rush as a receiving school: October 1, 2021: Admission decisions made two to three weeks after interview date. Official interview invite tracker 2020 2021 student doctor network communities updates medical school admissions 2020 2021 medical school interview …. More from this Member | Report Response. Below are the links to the tracker from last year along with a few other helpful spreadsheets. EthosEnergy is a leading provider of gas turbine, steam turbine, generator, compressor and transformer services. PrepMatch - Free Casper Preparation. You can donate us to my channel growth and would like to. How Medical School Admissions Committees Evaluate Your Applications Prospectivedoctor. In order to find a Sdn Interview Tracker 2020 2021 job with the ideal location for you, you should type A good Sdn Interview Tracker 2020 2021 job + Your location in our searching box. The Stanford University Internal Medicine Residency program is designed to prepare you for any career in Internal Medicine. He graduated from the New York Institute of Technology in 2000 and completed his residency …. See full list on utsouthwestern. The program offers broad clinical experience across three hospitals, supportive teaching faculty who are leaders in their fields, a strong esprit de corps, housestaff research opportunities, and top-ranked fellowship and. Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs email) Interview dates (specify in-person vs. The About pop-up window shows the product name, associated version string, and copyright message. Louis, MO 63110-1010. When you use Interview Feedback, you will find common questions asked during medical school interviews as submitted by previous interviewees. A bit early but hey. Stings a bit but so it goes. OOS, WARS ~81, LM 70. I know this year is unlike any other for y'all applying and invite you to reach out to current M1s/M2s, etc. SDN publishes new articles, interviews, podcasts, and features every weekday. The Student Doctor Network was founded by students in 1999 to help students become doctors. Created for students, by students to help build a diverse doctor workforce. Consistently ranked a top medical school for research, Washington University School of Medicine is also a catalyst in the St. The PR visa does not make you a citizen of Canada; you are still a citizen of your native country. Canadian Friendly American Medical Schools How To Get In Shemmassian Academic Consulting. The 2021-2022 interviews will be done virtually and conducted over a half day. Interview Feedback is the original databank of real interview questions from medical, dental, and other health professional schools. II: Interview Invite date. if you have any questions. Below are the links to the tracker from last year along with a few other helpful spreadsheets. No Medical School Interview Invites What You Can Do Next. Software-Defined Networking (SDN) is a network architecture approach that enables the network to be intelligently and centrally controlled, or ‘programmed,’ using software applications. Official interview invite tracker 2020 2021 student doctor network communities updates medical school admissions 2020 2021 medical school interview information md do programs motivate 2020 medical school application changes tracker prospective doctor. August 3 at 10:17 AM ·. Received an II from TTUHSC - El Paso on 1 July 2020. We have been closely following reports on the recent COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation and how it will affect the 2020 …. The 2021-2022 interviews will be done virtually and conducted over a half day. Complete July. 2020-2021 TMDSAS Rank List Thread. Interviews conducted. Reddit premed why you need be careful official interview invite tracker 2020 how to ace medical school interviews reddit med school interview jobs. A bit early but hey. Latest MCAT test date. (Optional) IA: Interview Attendance date. When you use Interview Feedback, you will find common questions asked during medical school interviews as submitted by previous interviewees. Created for students, by students to help build a diverse doctor workforce. Pre-II rejection just now. Overall, in the U. Hi, Class of 2021! Lets get the new cycle going. Rutgers sent me an in-person interview invite for Friday, 9/11. The 2021-2022 interviews will be done virtually and conducted over a half day. ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Let's pin a new one of these for this year’s applicants. com/album/id1482570099?ls=1&app=itunesStream on Apple Music -http://itunes. Quillen Magazine Summer 2021 Issue. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. Canadian Friendly American Medical Schools How To Get In Shemmassian Academic Consulting. The link to the SDN thread will posted below. October 15, 2021 - March 15, 2022. 3 days ago ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Let's pin a new one of …. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (MD) 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (DO) Post-II Acceptance Percentages. My interview took place 30 July …. Medical Schools' Responses to the COVID-19 Vaccine. The interview process will be in a multiple mini-interview (MMI) format that is live and interactive. Billing Support: Email us or call 1. Include the date you received the secondary. Residency 2021-22 State ,City / Town,Program,PGY1 and/or PGY2 specialty,Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs …. government sponsored exchange visitor (J visa) applicants and their dependents are not required to pay application processing fees if participating in a Department of State, a U. We are always trying to provide you a 99. SDN Link: ***2021-2022 MD/PhD Interview Invites*** | Student Doctor Network Communities. July 10, 2021. 99% bot availibility, without any lags to ensure you the best experience while using Invite Tracker. Or visit learn. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. Agency for International Development (USAID), or a Federally funded. Friday, November 12, 2021 at 2:00 p. Deadline to submit application to AMCAS and designate Rush as a receiving school: October 1, 2021: Admission decisions made two to three weeks after interview date. II: Interview Invite date. IDC Finds Growth in the Ethernet Switch Market and Slight Decline in the Router Market in Q2 2021. 2020 Medical School Application Changes Tracker. Today, the discussion touches on the secondary applications, interviews, and the timing and process of it all. Marciano is a pediatric gastroenterologist at NYU Langone on Long Island. Submit as soon as possible so that you will have more time to gather the required supplemental …. Pre-II rejection just now. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. 2) If someone has already received an interview invite from a school that you have recently been invited to as well, just post a child comment in the format above. OOS, WARS ~81, LM 70. Copy the previous posters list, unbold their …. There will be a 9:00 AM interview and a 1:00 PM interview option, with a combined 11:00 AM information session. When you use Interview Feedback, you will find common questions asked during medical school interviews as submitted by previous interviewees. Because of the ongoing complications brought about by COVID-19, your VCU School of Medicine interview will be conducted online. Pre-II rejection just now. if you have any questions. This year’s theme is “Translational Science in a Pandemic. Below are the links to the tracker from last year along with a few other helpful spreadsheets. (Optional) IA: Interview Attendance date. Interviews take place from August – February and are scheduled in Eastern Time. How Medical …. The 2021-2022 interviews will be done virtually and conducted over a half day. SDN Interview Question Databank. Official interview invite tracker 2020 2021 student doctor network communities updates medical school admissions 2020 2021 medical school interview information md do programs motivate 2020 medical school application changes tracker prospective doctor. Other Resources: Medical School Application Discord. You may be invited to attend either a morning or afternoon session based on availability. 2021 at 8 PM: SDN welcomes Dr. Pre-II rejection just now. The Medical School Interview Process In 2021 For Canadians Q A With Student …. You can color code the dates in the column to track the ones you returned the fastest. Latest MCAT test date. Thread of the Day l Just because someone else got an interview invite doesn't mean your application has been passed over or …. Louis biotech and startup scene. August 3 at 10:17 AM ·. The Medical School Interview Process In 2021 For Canadians Q A With Student You. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. SDN publishes new articles, interviews, podcasts, and features every weekday. My interview took place 30 July 2020, but there were two weeks of interviews before then, I believe. com/album/id/1482570099Stream on Spo. Canadian Friendly American Medical Schools How To Get In Shemmassian Academic Consulting. Purchase on iTunes -http://itunes. 2020-2021 Accepted Profiles. If you are considering the field, or currently studying public health, this webinar will help you understand what opportunities are available to you now, and after completing a master’s in public health! More information & to register 👇. In the meantime, work on your update letters, start investigating the possibilities for next year and keep working to strengthen your application. Aug 06, 2021 · FERRERO GROUP. Medical school factsheet - University of Michigan. 7% During the Second Quarter of 2021, According. Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs email) Interview dates (specify in-person vs. com/album/id1482570099?ls=1&app=itunesStream on Apple Music -http://itunes. August 3 at 10:17 AM ·. These medical schools want to invite the applicants who are more likely to accept the interview invite and those who are more likely to matriculate once accepted. An extensive and constantly increasing presence that attests to the quality of the products, the group's ability to adapt. Interview Feedback is the original databank of real interview questions from medical, dental, and other health professional schools. Interviews take place from August – February and are scheduled in Eastern Time. Below are the links to the tracker from last year along with a few other helpful spreadsheets. Articles are listed below in reverse date order:. ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Close. OOS, WARS ~81, LM 70. Marciano is a pediatric gastroenterologist at NYU Langone on Long Island. This press release features multimedia. I posted this over on the Baylor thread and felt it would be beneficial for the stress levels of everyone else who is constantly checking the school. He graduated from the New York Institute of Technology in 2000 and completed his residency at Downstate medical center before moving on to finish his pediatric gastroenterology fellowship in 2007 at the prestigious Montefiore medical center. ITU Digital World 2021. Our system will check and give the best suggestions, you can easily get a good Sdn Interview Tracker 2020 2021 job near your living place. Second Interview Invitation Email | Interview Invitation | @SMART HR Thanks for watching this video. A bit early but hey. 99% bot availibility, without any lags to ensure you the best experience while using Invite Tracker. The Student Doctor Network was founded by students in 1999 to help students become doctors. Worldwide Server Market Revenue Declined 2. Security Notifications. 2) If someone has already received an interview invite from a school that you have recently been invited to as well, just post a child comment in the format above. This helps operators manage the entire network consistently and holistically, regardless of the underlying network technology. The application opens in early May. Review the instructions available on the website of the embassy or consulate where you will apply to learn more about fee payment. Easy to Use The bot configuration is explained in our documentation and we also made an understandable and easy-to-use web dashboard just for you. Search the world's information, including webpages, images, videos and more. Worldwide Enterprise External OEM Storage Systems Market Revenue Increased 9. The Medical School Interview Process In 2021 For Canadians Q A With Student You. Official Interview Invite Tracker 2020 2021 Student Doctor Network Communities. My interview took place 30 July 2020, but there were two weeks of interviews before then, I believe. (Optional) IA: Interview Attendance date. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. 3 days ago ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Let's pin a new one of these for this year's applicants. Sign in and put your creative energy to work. Marciano is a pediatric gastroenterologist at NYU Langone on Long Island. Consistently ranked a top medical school for research, Washington University School of Medicine is also a catalyst in the St. You can color code the dates in the column to track the ones you returned the fastest. Below are the links to the tracker from last year along with a few other helpful spreadsheets. Access Google Forms with a free Google account (for personal use) or Google Workspace account (for business use). Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. Reddit premed why you need be careful official interview invite tracker 2020 how to ace medical school interviews reddit med school interview jobs. The Ferrero Group has a strong global presence and Ferrero products are present and sold, directly or through authorised retailers, in more than 170 countries belonging to the entire international community. Social network for pre-medical students featuring thousands of searchable profiles of medical school applicants. com/album/id1482570099?ls=1&app=itunesStream on Apple Music -http://itunes. Here is a list of application changes each med school has made. July 10, 2021. SDN publishes new articles, interviews, podcasts, and features every weekday. PrepMatch - Free Casper Preparation. 2020-2021 TMDSAS Rank List Thread. Interviews take place from August – February and are scheduled in Eastern Time. artist2022 said: Last year's thread: Official 2020-2021 School Interview Invites Tracker. Sign up now for expert insight, international perspectives - and informal networking. Hi, Class of 2021! Lets get the new cycle going. Interviews conducted. Post-II Acceptance Percentages. Our system will check and give the best suggestions, you can easily get a good Sdn Interview Tracker 2020 2021 job near your living place. Return all secondaries within TWO WEEKS to increase your chances of receiving an interview invitation. My interview took place 30 July 2020, but there were two weeks of interviews before then, I believe. Program Director Rankings vs USNWR …. Current and previous interviews with practicing doctors across the health professions. Copy the previous posters list, unbold their entry and bold your new entry, e. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. Johnathan Phi on Reddit-medical-school-interview-tracker Fix. Here are some general parameters for the med school interview invitation timeline, but – again – these vary by school, and there is no standardized timeline for. Medical schools have altered their applications, schedules, and dates due to COVID-19. Deadline to submit application to AMCAS and designate Rush as a receiving school: October 1, 2021: Admission decisions made two to three weeks after interview date. Or visit learn. The Medical School Interview Process In 2021 For Canadians Q A With Student …. "The interview process. 2020-2021 interview and outcome tracker MD. We have been closely following reports on the recent COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation and how it will affect the 2020 medical school application cycle. Hey All! I was inspired to make an interview tracker like last years (shout out to u/lpp06 and u/edhackett), with some additional changes to include information from …. Official …. We are always trying to provide you a 99. ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Let's pin a new one of these for this year’s applicants. We have been closely following reports on the recent COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation and how it will affect the 2020 …. Eventbrite brings people together through live experiences. 5% Year Over Year in the Second Quarter of 2021, According to IDC. The validity of a PR visa is five years which can later be renewed. Created for students, by students to help build a diverse doctor workforce. ET : Applicant Standard Registration Deadline for the Match and SOAP. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. 2) If someone has already received an interview invite from a school that you have recently been invited to as well, just post a child comment in the format above. July 10, 2021. The earliest IIs seem to go to those who not only submitted secondaries early but who have (1) high stats and (2) very specific reasons for attending the program – this is where tailoring your secondary to each school is a huge advantage. He graduated from the New York Institute of Technology in 2000 and completed his residency at Downstate medical center before moving on to finish his pediatric gastroenterology fellowship in 2007 at the prestigious Montefiore medical center. , the majority of candidates hear back from medical schools for interviews between October and January, but there's variation even in that wide …. The 2021-2022 interviews will be done virtually and conducted over a half day. Marciano is a pediatric gastroenterologist at NYU Langone on Long Island. Sign in and put your creative energy to work. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (MD) 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (DO) Post-II Acceptance Percentages. com/album/id/1482570099Stream on Spo. Overall, in the U. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker. Louis, MO 63110-1010. Click to expand This is a tracker for dental schools!. 99% bot availibility, without any lags to ensure you the best experience while using Invite Tracker. He graduated from the New York Institute of Technology in 2000 and completed his residency …. Medical schools have altered their applications, schedules, and dates due to COVID-19. You may be invited to attend either a morning or afternoon session based on availability. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker. The application opens in early May. Johnathan Phi on Reddit-medical-school-interview-tracker Fix. How Medical School Admissions Committees Evaluate Your Applications Prospectivedoctor. Thread of the Day l Just because someone else got an interview invite doesn't mean your application has been passed over or rejected l Pre-Medical Forum. Interview Feedback. Medical Schools' …. Stings a bit but so it goes. Copy the previous posters list, unbold their …. Whats people lookup in this blog:. Submit as soon as possible so that you will have more time to gather the required supplemental …. Articles are listed below in reverse date order:. Medical schools have altered their applications, schedules, and dates due to COVID-19. This press release features multimedia. Interview Feedback. SDN Interview Question Databank. Marciano is a pediatric gastroenterologist at NYU Langone on Long Island. If you're invited to more than one interview at the same time, get in touch with the second training provider to ask if your interview can be rearranged. ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Close. Jun 25, 2021 · Posted on 25/06/2021 MSC has been continuously investing to help manage the unprecedented impact on supply chains of the COVID pandemic and port congestion problems, CEO Soren Toft told the IAPH World Ports Conference in a keynote interview on the Essential Role of Container Shipping & Logistics, in which he defended the role of carriers in. Return all secondaries within TWO WEEKS to increase your chances of receiving an interview invitation. October 15, 2021 - March 15, 2022. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. Some schools track how long it takes for you to submit your secondary application, and they use that data to determine how interested you are in that school. Program Director vs USNWR Rankings2021. Sign up now for expert insight, international perspectives - and informal networking. Medical school factsheet - University of Michigan. Hi, Class of 2021! Lets get the new cycle going. PrepMatch - Free Casper Preparation. Canadian Friendly American Medical Schools How To Get In Shemmassian Academic Consulting. *** 2020-2021 MD/PhD Interview Invites *** Feel like we should pin a new one of these for this year’s applicants. Program Director Rankings vs USNWR …. July 10, 2021. Forum list New posts How We Moderate Vision, Values and Policies New posts How We Moderate Vision, Values and Policies. With a PR visa, you will be given permanent resident status. Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts Session 16 In this episode of the OldPreMeds Podcast, we again dive into our Nontraditional Premed Forum where we pull a question and deliver the answers right on to you. Here is a list of application changes each med school has made. com/album/id1482570099?ls=1&app=itunesStream on Apple Music -http://itunes. I'll be looking at the …. Some schools track how long it takes for you to submit your secondary application, and they use that data to determine how interested you are in that school. Residency 2021-22 State ,City / Town,Program,PGY1 and/or PGY2 specialty,Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs email),Interview dates (specify in-person vs. Received an II from TTUHSC - El Paso on 1 July 2020. 2020-2021 interview and outcome tracker DO. The Quillen College of Medicine has an experienced and qualified faculty in the biological, behavioral, and clinical sciences. Official Interview Invite Tracker 2020 2021 Student Doctor Network Communities. 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (MD) 2019-2020 interview and outcome tracker (DO) Post-II Acceptance Percentages. Medical Schools' …. *~*~* Official 2020-2021 School Interview Invites Tracker *~*~* Rutgers sent me an in-person interview invite for Friday, 9/11. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. 2020 medical school application changes tracker prospectivedoctor when do you hear back from medical schools for interviews bemo when do you hear back from medical schools for. ET : Applicant Standard Registration Deadline for the Match and SOAP. IDC Finds Growth in the Ethernet Switch Market and Slight Decline in the Router Market in Q2 2021. Student Doctor Network. Program Director vs USNWR Rankings2021. Jul 20, 2021 · Stephanie Feraday, President & CEO of aPriori, the leading provider of digital manufacturing simulation software, has been accepted into Forbes Technology Council, an invitation-only community for world-class CIOs, CTOs, and technology executives. government sponsored exchange visitor (J visa) applicants and their dependents are not required to pay application processing fees if participating in a Department of State, a U. 99% bot availibility, without any lags to ensure you the best experience while using Invite Tracker. II: Interview Invite date. Johnathan Phi on Reddit-medical-school-interview-tracker Fix. In addition to the full-time faculty, a number of practicing physicians in the community participate in the educational process as both part-time and volunteer faculty. OOS, WARS ~81, LM 70. Received an II from TAMU - COM on 8 July 2020. Here is a list …. Residency 2021-22 State ,City / Town,Program,PGY1 and/or PGY2 specialty,Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs …. The application opens in early May. Interviews take place from August – February and are scheduled in Eastern Time. Copy the previous posters list, unbold their …. (Optional) IA: Interview Attendance date. Review the instructions available on the website of the embassy or consulate where you will apply to learn more about fee payment. Whats people lookup in this blog:. Washington University School of Medicine. I know this year is unlike any other for y'all applying and invite you to reach out to current M1s/M2s, etc. SDN Interview Question Databank. Please keep posts in this thread limited to interview invites only. For example, for 2021, the version string is 2021. Euclid Ave. Interviews conducted. Stings a bit but so it goes. Diagnostic Radiology: Saskatchewan (Nov 27), Manitoba (Dec 1). The earliest IIs seem to go to those who not only submitted secondaries early but who have (1) high stats and (2) very specific reasons for attending the program – this is where tailoring your secondary to each school is a huge advantage. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. Hi, Class of 2021! Lets get the new cycle going. SDN publishes new articles, interviews, podcasts, and features every weekday. All application materials for the 2021 match cycle (to start Fellowship in July 2022) are due on August 1, 2021. May 27, 2020 · The AMA has curated a selection of resources to assist residents, medical students and faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic to help manage the shifting timelines, cancellations and adjustments to testing, rotations and other events at this time. This press release features multimedia. , the majority of candidates hear back from medical schools for interviews between October and January, but there’s variation even in that wide spread of time. Pre-II rejection just now. Official Interview Invite Tracker 2020 2021 Student Doctor Network Communities. 2019-2020 Med School Impressions Thread. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. Dedicated to enhancing your power, oil and gas or industrial operations. Review the instructions available on the website of the embassy or consulate where you will apply to learn more about fee payment. Jul 06, 2020 · Tracking your secondary applications. One of the options to migrate to Canada is to obtain a Permanent Resident (PR) visa. My interview took place 30 July …. Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs email) Interview dates (specify in-person vs. With expert resources and tireless advocacy, the AMA is your powerful ally against COVID-19. Here is a list of application changes each med school has made. When you use Interview Feedback, you will find common questions asked during medical school interviews as submitted by previous interviewees. Interview Feedback. October 15, 2021 - March 15, 2022. 6 people in 30 minutes is a very short period of time to get to know your applicants. II: Interview Invite date. The interview process will be in a multiple mini-interview (MMI) format that is live and interactive. Forum list New posts How We Moderate Vision, Values and Policies New posts How We Moderate Vision, Values and Policies. This press release features multimedia. Find the current product version by going to Help > About Adobe Acrobat Reader DC. Hopefully, the coming weeks will bring you the interview invitation you have been waiting for. government sponsored exchange visitor (J visa) applicants and their dependents are not required to pay application processing fees if participating in a Department of State, a U. If you are considering the field, or currently studying public health, this webinar will help you understand what …. May/June 2021: AMCAS opens for applicants to build their application and start submitting to schools: Mid-July: Earliest date to be invited to complete a Secondary …. ***2021-2022 Interview Invite Tracker*** Let's pin a new one of these for this year’s applicants. Medical Schools' …. All application materials for the 2021 match cycle (to start Fellowship in July 2022) are due on August 1, 2021. Articles are listed below in reverse date order:. You may begin to submit application materials via ERAS on July 1, 2021. Here is a list …. Received an II from TAMU - COM on 8 July 2020. Worldwide Server Market Revenue Declined 2. A bit early but hey. Received an II from TTUHSC - El Paso on 1 July 2020. Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs email) Interview dates (specify in-person vs. Second Interview Invitation Email | Interview Invitation | @SMART HR Thanks for watching this video. My interview took place 30 July 2020, but there were two weeks of interviews before then, I believe. This press release features multimedia. SDN brings together thousands of current and future medical students into one community where you can share information, offer guidance, and provide encouragement to peers and those coming up behind you. Include the date you received the secondary. com/album/id/1482570099Stream on Spo. When you …. Articles are listed below in reverse date order:. (Optional) IA: Interview Attendance date. Complete July. Click To Tweet. We are always trying to provide you a 99. OOS, WARS ~81, LM 70. Thread of the Day l Just because someone else got an interview invite doesn't mean your application has been passed over or rejected l Pre-Medical Forum. Interviews take place from August – February and are scheduled in Eastern Time. Hi, Class of 2021! Lets get the new cycle going. *~*~* Official 2020-2021 School Interview Invites Tracker *~*~* Rutgers sent me an in-person interview invite for Friday, 9/11. ( $50 additional fee for late registration) Program quota change, program withdrawal, and program SOAP participation status. , the majority of candidates hear back from medical schools for interviews between October and January, but there's variation even in that wide …. artist2022 said: Last year's thread: Official 2020-2021 School Interview Invites Tracker. The About pop-up window shows the product name, associated version string, and copyright message. Garret FitzGerald and the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics at the University of Pennsylvania cordially invite you to the 16th Annual ITMAT International Symposium, which will take place as a virtual and in-person event on Mon. Received an II from TAMU - COM on 8 July 2020. There is a version of this post on SDN; however, I understand some people do not utilize SDN. virtual) Date heard from program: …. First date available 6 August 2020. All application materials for the 2021 match cycle (to start Fellowship in July 2022) are due on August 1, 2021. Or visit learn. Marciano is a pediatric gastroenterologist at NYU Langone on Long Island. Applications are reviewed in the late Summer after the following documentation is received: Completed ERAS Application Form; Residency Program Director’s Letter. I know this year is unlike any other for y'all applying and invite you to reach out to current M1s/M2s, etc. Jul 06, 2020 · Tracking your secondary applications. Here are some general parameters for the med school interview invitation timeline, but – again – these vary by school, and there is no standardized timeline for. Medical School Acceptance Rates Updated In 2021 Bemo. Interviews conducted. Received an II from TTUHSC - El Paso on 1 July 2020. Jun 25, 2021 · Posted on 25/06/2021 MSC has been continuously investing to help manage the unprecedented impact on supply chains of the COVID pandemic and port congestion problems, CEO Soren Toft told the IAPH World Ports Conference in a keynote interview on the Essential Role of Container Shipping & Logistics, in which he defended the role of carriers in. This year’s theme is “Translational Science in a Pandemic. They said that they will have in-person interviews for anyone from a state that isn't on the NJ …. ( $50 additional fee for late registration) Program quota change, program withdrawal, and program SOAP participation status. ET : Applicant Standard Registration Deadline for the Match and SOAP. Euclid Ave. Reddit premed why you need be careful official interview invite tracker 2020 how to ace medical school interviews reddit med school interview jobs. Official Interview Invite Tracker 2020 2021 Student Doctor Network Communities. The interview process will be in a multiple mini-interview (MMI) format that is live and interactive. Residency 2021-22 State ,City / Town,Program,PGY1 and/or PGY2 specialty,Phase I Invite: Date heard from program with interview offer (indicate phone vs …. Johnathan Phi on Reddit-medical-school-interview-tracker Fix. In addition to the full-time faculty, a number of practicing physicians in the community participate in the educational process as both part-time and volunteer faculty. 2) If someone has already received an interview invite from a school that you have recently been invited to as well, just post a child comment in the format above. Louis biotech and startup scene. Click to expand This is a tracker for dental schools!. Also, there is only 1 dental class at the school and they have just started the PBL curriculum. Complete July. I posted this over on the Baylor thread and felt it would be beneficial for the stress levels of everyone else who is constantly checking the school. Here is a list of application changes each med school has made. Click To Tweet. , the majority of candidates hear back from medical schools for interviews between October and January, but there’s variation even in that wide spread of time. "The interview process. Pre-II rejection just now. These medical schools want to invite the applicants who are more likely to accept the interview invite and those who are more likely to matriculate once accepted. I felt like I had a lot more to say but wasn't given the chance to. He graduated from the New York Institute of Technology in 2000 and completed his residency …. Hey All! I was inspired to make an interview tracker like last years (shout out to u/lpp06 and u/edhackett), with some additional changes to include information from …. virtual) Date heard from program: …. SDN Link: ***2021-2022 MD/PhD Interview Invites*** | Student Doctor Network Communities. Aug 19, 2021. Overall, in the U.

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