Ted wiki

TED (conference)

Global set of conferences

"TED Talk" redirects here. For other uses of TED, see TED.

TED three letter logo.svg
Type of businessLLC

Type of site

Conference
Available inEnglish, multilingual subtitles, transcript
FoundedFebruary 23, 1984; 37 years ago (1984-02-23)
Headquarters
Area servedCanada
United States
OwnerSapling Foundation (1984–2019)
TED Foundation (2019–present)[1]
Founder(s)Harry Marks[2]
Richard Saul Wurman
RevenueIncrease US$66.2 million (2015)[3]
URLted.com
RegistrationOptional
Launched
  • February 23, 1984; 37 years ago (1984-02-23) (first conference)
  • February 22, 1990; 31 years ago (1990-02-22) (annual event)
Current statusActive

TED Conferences LLC (Technology, Entertainment, Design) is an American media organization that posts talks online for free distribution under the slogan "ideas worth spreading". TED was conceived by Richard Saul Wurman, who co-founded it with Harry Marks in February 1984[4] as a conference; it has been held annually since 1990.[5] TED's early emphasis was on technology and design, consistent with its Silicon Valley origins. It has since broadened its perspective to include talks on many scientific, cultural, political, humanitarian and academic topics.[6] It has been curated by Chris Anderson, a British-American businessman, through the non-profit TED Foundation since July 2019 (originally by the non-profit Sapling Foundation).[1][7][8]

The main TED conference is held annually in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, at the Vancouver Convention Centre. Prior to 2014, the conference was held in Long Beach, California, United States.[9] TED events are also held throughout North America and in Europe, Asia, and Africa, offering live streaming of the talks. They address a wide range of topics within the research and practice of science and culture, often through storytelling.[10] The speakers are given a maximum of 18 minutes to present their ideas in the most innovative and engaging ways they can.[11] Past speakers include Bill Clinton, Sean M. Carroll, Elon Musk, Ray Dalio, Cédric Villani, Stephen Hawking, Jane Goodall, Al Gore, Temple Grandin, Shahrukh Khan, Gordon Brown, David Cameron, Billy Graham, Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris, Bill Gates, Dolph Lundgren, Bob Weir, Shashi Tharoor, Bono, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Leana Wen, Pope Francis, Jeff Bezos, and many Nobel Prize winners.[12]

Since June 2006,[2] TED Talks have been offered for free viewing online, under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives Creative Commons license, through TED.com.[15] As of December 2020[update] over 3,500 TED Talks are freely available on the website.[16] In June 2011, TED Talks' combined viewing figure stood at more than 500 million,[17] by November 2012, TED Talks had been watched over one billion times worldwide.[18] While TED Talks are available for free online for personal learning, sharing TED content in commercial contexts (for example, in corporate learning and talent development) requires a license.[19]

History[edit]

1984–1999: Founding and early years[edit]

TED was conceived in 1984 by Emmy-winning broadcast and graphic designer Harry Marks, who observed a convergence of the fields of technology, entertainment, and design (that is, "TED"). He approached architect and graphic designer Richard Saul Wurman for assistance, who agreed on the condition that he be allowed to be a co-founder.[20] The first conference, organized that same year by Marks and Wurman with help from Dr. Frank Stanton, featured demos of the compact disc, co-developed by Philips and Sony and one of the first demonstrations of the Apple Macintosh computer.[2][21] Presentations were given by famous mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot and influential members of the digerati community, like Nicholas Negroponte and Stewart Brand. The event was financially unsuccessful; hence, it took six years before the second conference was organized.[22]

TED2 was held at the Monterey Conference Center in California in 1990. From 1990 onward, a growing community of "TEDsters" gathered annually with Wurman leading the conference in Monterey until 2009,[23] when it was relocated to Long Beach, California due to a substantial increase in attendees.[24][25] Initially, the speakers had been drawn from the fields of expertise behind the acronym TED, but during the nineties, the roster of presenters broadened to include scientists, philosophers, musicians, religious leaders, philanthropists, and many others.[22]

2000–present: Recent growth[edit]

In 2000, Wurman, looking for a successor at age 65, met with new-media entrepreneur and TED enthusiast Chris Anderson to discuss future happenings. Anderson's UK media company Future bought TED. In November 2001, Anderson's non-profit The Sapling Foundation (motto: "fostering the spread of great ideas")[1] acquired TED from Future for £6m.[26] In February 2002, Anderson gave a TED Talk in which he explained his vision of the conference and his future role of curator.[27] Wurman left after the 2002 conference.

In 2006, attendance cost was $4,400 per person and was by invitation only.[28] The membership model was shifted in January 2007 to an annual membership fee of $6,000, which includes attendance of the conference, club mailings, networking tools, and conference DVDs. The 2018 conference was $10,000 per attendee.[29]

Between 2001 and 2006, TED upgraded its platform to have TED talks online for free, added TEDGlobal that became a worldwide conference, and created the TED prize.

In 2014, the conference was relocated to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

TED is currently funded by a combination of various revenue streams, including conference attendance fees, corporate sponsorships, foundation support, licensing fees, and book sales. Corporate sponsorships are diverse, provided by companies such as Google, GE, AOL, Goldman Sachs, and The Coca-Cola Company. Sponsors do not participate in the creative direction of the event, nor are they allowed to present on the main stage, in the interests of independence.[30][31]

In 2015, TED staff consisted of about 180 people headquartered in New York City and Vancouver, B.C.[32] On July 1, 2019, the TED Conferences LLC was transferred from Sapling Foundation to TED Foundation to "align with our brand and make it easier for our donors to connect TED donations to TED Conferences, LLC."[33][34]

At TED 2015, Bill Gates warned that the world was not prepared for the next pandemic, a situation that would come to pass in late 2019 when the COVID-19 pandemic began. The ensuing pandemic prompted the 2020 edition of the event to be initially postponed from April to July 2020 before its outright cancellation.[35]

TED Prize[edit]

The TED Prize was introduced in 2005. Until 2010, it annually granted three individuals $100,000 and a "wish to change the world".[36] Each winner unveils their wish at the main annual conference. Since 2010, in a changed selection process, a single winner is chosen to ensure that TED can maximize its efforts in achieving the winner's wish. In 2012, the prize was not awarded to an individual, but to a concept connected to the current global phenomenon of increasing urbanization. In 2013, the prize amount was increased to $1 million.[37] TED Prize winners in previous years:

TED Conference commissioned New York artist Tom Shannon to create a prize sculpture to be given to all TED Prize winners. The sculpture consists of an eight-inch-diameter (20 cm) aluminum sphere magnetically levitated above a walnut disc. As of 2018 the TED Prize has been recast as The Audacious Project.[54]

TED.com[edit]

In 2005, Chris Anderson hired June Cohen as Director of TED Media. In June 2006, after Cohen's idea of a TV show based on TED lectures was rejected by several networks, a selection of talks that had received the highest audience ratings was posted on the websites of TED, YouTube, and iTunes, under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0.[55][56] Initially, only a handful of talks were posted, to test if there was an audience for them. In January of the next year, the number of TED Talks on the site had grown to 44, and they had been viewed more than three million times. On the basis of that success, the organization pumped hundreds of thousands of dollars into its video production operations and into the development of a website to showcase about 100 of the talks.[55][57]

In April 2007, the new TED.com was launched, developed by design firm Method. In subsequent years, the website has won many prizes, among which are seven Webby Awards, iTunes' "Best Podcast of the Year" (2006–2010), the Communication Arts Interactive Award for "Information Design" in 2007, the OMMA Award for "video sharing" in 2008, the Web Visionary Award for "technical achievement" in 2008, The One Show Interactive Bronze Award in 2008, the AIGA Annual Design Competition (2009), and a Peabody Award in 2012.[58][59][60][61]

As of October 2020, over 3500 TED talks had been posted.[16] Every week 5 to 7 new talks are published. In January 2009, the then number of videos had been viewed 50 million times. In June 2011, the number of views totaled 500 million,[62] and on November 13, 2012, TED reached its billionth video view.[18] Chris Anderson in an interview in March 2012:

It used to be 800 people getting together once a year; now it's about a million people a day watching TED Talks online. When we first put up a few of the talks as an experiment, we got such impassioned responses that we decided to flip the organization on its head and think of ourselves not so much as a conference but as "ideas worth spreading," building a big website around it. The conference is still the engine, but the website is the amplifier that takes the ideas to the world.[63]

In March 2012, Netflix announced a deal to stream an initial series of 16 two-hour shows, consisting of TED Talks covering similar subjects, from multiple speakers. The content was made available to subscribers in the US, Canada, Latin America, the UK, and Ireland.[64] Hosted by Jami Floyd, TED Talks NYC debuted on NYC Life on March 21, 2012.[65]

Related projects and events[edit]

TED Conferences[edit]

Date Conference Theme Location Notable speakers
May 18, 2020 − July 10, 2020TED 2020UnchartedOnline @ TED.com
July 21–25, 2019TEDSummit 2019A Community Beyond BordersEdinburgh, ScotlandNicola Sturgeon, Carole Cadwalladr
April 15–19, 2019TED 2019Bigger than usVancouver, British ColumbiaAmerica Ferrera
November 28–30, 2018TEDWomen 2018Showing upPalm Springs, California
November 14–16, 2018TEDMED 2018Chaos+ClarityPalm Springs, California
April 10–14, 2018TED 2018The Age of AmazementVancouver, British Columbia
November 1–3, 2017TEDWomen 2017BridgesNew Orleans, Louisiana
August 27–30, 2017TEDGlobal 2017Builders. Truth-tellers. Catalysts.Arusha, Tanzania
April 24-28-2017TED 2017The Future YouVancouver, British Columbia
November 14, 2016TEDYouth 2016Made in the FutureBrooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York
October 26–28, 2016TEDWomen 2016It's about time.San Francisco, California
June 26–30, 2016TEDSummit 2016Aim higher. Together.Banff, Alberta
February 15–19, 2016TED 2016DreamVancouver, British Columbia
November 14, 2015TEDYouth 2015Made in the FutureBrooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York
November 1–6, 2015TED Talks LiveSix nights of talks on BroadwayTown Hall Theatre, New York, New York
May 27–29, 2015TEDWomen 2015MomentumMonterey, California
March 16–20, 2015TED 2015Truth and DareVancouver, British ColumbiaBill Gates
March 16–20, 2015TEDActive 2015Truth and DareWhistler, British Columbia
November 15, 2014TEDYouth 2014Worlds ImaginedBrooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York
October 6–10, 2014TEDGlobal 2014South!Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
March 17–21, 2014TED 2014The Next ChapterVancouver, British Columbia
February 25-March 1, 2013TED 2013The Young. The Wise. The Undiscovered.Long Beach, California

TEDGlobal[edit]

In 2005, under Anderson's supervision, a more internationally oriented sister conference was added, under the name TEDGlobal. It was held, in chronological order: in Oxford, UK (2005), in Arusha, Tanzania (2007, titled TEDAfrica), in Oxford again (2009 and 2010), and in Edinburgh, UK (2011, 2012, and 2013). In 2014, it was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.[66] Additionally, there was TED India, in Mysore (2009) and TEDGlobal London in London (2015).[67] TEDGlobal 2017 was held again in Arusha, Tanzania and it was curated and hosted by Emeka Okafor.[68]

TED's European director (and curator of TEDGlobal) is Swiss-born Bruno Giussani.[69]

TED Translators (formerly The Open Translation Project (OTP))[edit]

TED Translators started as the TED Open Translation Project in May 2009. It intends to "[reach] out to the 4.5 billion people on the planet who don't speak English", according to TED Curator Chris Anderson.[70] The OTP used crowd-based subtitling platforms to translate the text of TED and TED-Ed videos, as well as to caption and translate videos created in the TEDx program. (Until May 2012 it worked with its technology partner dotSUB, and then with the open source translation tool Amara). When the project was launched, 300 translations had been completed in 40 languages by 200 volunteer transcribers.[13] By May 2015, more than 70,000 sets of subtitles in 107 languages[71] had been completed by (an all-time total of) 38,173 volunteer translators.[72]

The project helped generate a significant increase in international visitors to TED's website. Traffic from outside the US has increased 350 percent: there has been 600 percent growth in Asia, and more than 1000 percent in South America.[73] Members have several tools dedicated to knowledge management, such as the OTP Wiki OTPedia, Facebook groups, or video tutorials.[74][75]

TEDx[edit]

See also: List of TEDx conferences

TEDx are independent events similar to TED in presentation. They can be organized by anyone who obtains a free license from TED, and agrees to follow certain principles.[76] TEDx events are required to be non-profit, but organizers may use an admission fee or commercial sponsorship to cover costs.[77] Speakers are not paid and must also relinquish the copyrights to their materials, which TED may edit and distribute under a Creative Commons license.[78]

As of January 2014, the TEDxTalks library contained some 30,000 films and presentations from more than 130 countries.[79][80] As of October 2017, the TEDx archive surpassed 100,000 talks.[81] In March 2013, eight TEDx events were organised every day; raised up from five in June 2012, the previous year, in 133 countries.[82][83] TEDx presentations may include live performances, which are catalogued in the TEDx Music Project.[84]

In 2011, TED began a program called "TEDx in a Box", which is intended to enable people in developing countries to hold TEDx events. TEDx also expanded to include TEDxYouth events, TEDx corporate events, and TEDxWomen.[citation needed] TEDxYouth events are independent programs set up for students who are in grades 7–12.[85] These events usually have audiences of people close to the age of the students and sometimes show TED Talks.[citation needed] According to TEDxSanta Cruz, "as of 2015, over 1,500 [TEDx events] have been scheduled all over the world."[86]

TEDx events have evolved over time. Events such as TEDxBeaconStreet created TEDx Adventures for participants. People may sign up for free, hands-on experiences in their local communities, led by an expert.[87]

A TEDx youth event license follows the same format as the standard event license and falls within the same TEDx event rules, except this event is oriented towards youth. TEDxYouth licenses may be held by youth, adults, or a combination of both. For events held at schools, the license must be held by a current student, faculty, or staff member. The first TEDxYouth event was held by [email protected] in Japan

TED Fellows[edit]

TED Fellows were introduced in 2007, during the first TEDAfrica conference in Arusha, Tanzania, where 100 young people were selected from across the continent. Two years later, during TEDIndia, 99 Fellows were recruited, mainly from South Asia.

In 2009, the Fellows program was initiated in its present form. For every TED or TEDGlobal conference, 20 Fellows are selected; a total of 40 new Fellows a year. Each year, 20 past Fellows are chosen to participate in the two-year Senior Fellows program (in which they will attend four more conferences).

2019 marked the tenth anniversary of the TED Fellows program.

Acceptance as a Fellow is not based on academic credentials, but mainly on past and current actions, and plans for the future.[88] Besides attending a conference free of charge, each Fellow takes part in a special program with mentoring by experts in the field of spreading ideas, and he or she can give a short talk on the "TED Fellows" stage. Some of these talks are subsequently published on TED.com. Senior Fellows have additional benefits and responsibilities.[89]

TED-Ed[edit]

TED-Ed is a YouTube channel from Ted which creates short animated educational videos. It also has its own website.[90] TED-Ed lessons are created in collaboration with educators and animators. Current advisers for Ted-Ed lessons include Aaron Sams, Jackie Bezos, John Hunter, Jonathan Bergmann, Sir Ken Robinson, Melinda French Gates, and Sal Khan. It has over 14.7 million subscribers and over 2.6 billion views as of September 2021.

TED Interview[edit]

The TED Interview is a weekly podcast launched on October 16, 2018, during which Chris Anderson holds conversations[91] with speakers who have previously given a TED talk,[92] providing the guest a chance to speak in greater depth about their background, projects, motivation,[93] re-evaluation of past experiences,[94][95] or plans for the future.

Each interview lasts between 45 minutes and about one hour. All podcasts are available on the TED website, in part together with transcripts, as well as through platforms such as Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, TuneIn, Stitcher, RadioPublic, Castbox, iHeartRadio, and BBC Radio 4 Extra.

Season Four began in March 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic as a live-stream broadcast co-hosted by Chris Anderson and Whitney Pennington Rodgers and often offered listeners the opportunity to submit questions to the speaker.

No. in season Title Airdate
Bonus [35]Adam Kucharski on what should — and shouldn't — worry us about the coronavirus Broadcast March 12, 2020
1 [36]Bill Gates on how we must respond to the COVID-19 pandemic Recorded March 24, 2020; broadcast March 30, 2020
2 [37]Seth Berkley on the quest for the coronavirus vaccine Recorded March 26, 2020; broadcast March 31, 2020
3 [38]Jonathan Sacks on building unity during a pandemic Recorded March 30, 2020; broadcast March 31, 2020
4 [39]Gary Liu on what the world can learn from China's response to COVID-19 Recorded March 25, 2020; broadcast April 1, 2020
5 [40]Sonia Shah: How to make pandemics optional, not inevitable Recorded March 31, 2020; broadcast April 2, 2020
6 [41]Matt Walker: How to sleep during a pandemic Recorded April 1, 2020; broadcast April 2, 2020
7 [42]Elizabeth Gilbert says it's OK to feel overwhelmed. Here's what to do next three pillars of leadership Recorded April 2, 2020; broadcast April 3, 2020
8 [43]Susan David: Emotional resilience right now Recorded March 23, 2020; broadcast April 4, 2020
9 [44]Priya Parker: How to create meaningful connections while apart Recorded March 27, 2020; broadcast April 5, 2020
10 [45]Danielle Allen: The tech we need to end the pandemic and restart the economy Recorded April 6, 2020; broadcast April 7, 2020
11 [46]Ray Dalio: What coronavirus means for the global economy Recorded April 9, 2020; broadcast April 10, 2020
12 [47]Fareed Zakaria: The world after the coronavirus pandemic Recorded April 9, 2020; broadcast April 10, 2020
13 [48]Elizabeth Dunn: Design your life for happiness Recorded February 5, 2020; broadcast April 17, 2020
14 [49]Dambisa Moyo: What we get wrong about global growth Recorded March 5, 2020; broadcast April 24, 2020
15 [50]Kristalina Georgieva: What we learn from the crisis can make our economy stronger Recorded on May 18, 2020; broadcast May 28, 2020
16 [51]Phillip Atiba Goff, Rashad Robinson, Bernice King, Anthony D. Romero: The path to ending systemic racism in the US Recorded on June 3, 2020; broadcast June 6, 2020
17 [52]Audrey Tang: How Taiwan used digital tools to solve the pandemic Recorded on June 1, 2020; broadcast June 11, 2020
18 [53]Dan Schulman: Why a company's future depends on putting its employees first Recorded on May 19, 2020; broadcast on June 18, 2020
19 [54]Ashraf Ghani: A path to peace in Afghanistan Recorded on June 16, 2020; broadcast June 25, 2020
20 [55]Al Gore: On the new urgency of the climate crisis Recorded on June 23, 2020; broadcast July 2, 2020
21 [56]Darren Walker: The role of the wealthy in achieving equality Recorded on July 1, 2020; broadcast July 9, 2020
22 [57]Malala Yousafzai: On why educating girls changes everything Recorded on July 8, 2020; broadcast July 16, 2020

TEDMED[edit]

Main article: TEDMED

TEDMED is an annual conference concerned with health and medicine. It is an independent event operating under license from the nonprofit TED conference.[96]

TEDMED was founded in 1998 by TED's founder Ricky Wurman. After years of inactivity, in 2008 Wurman sold TEDMED to entrepreneur Marc Hodosh, who recreated and relaunched it. The first event under Hodosh's ownership was held in San Diego in October 2009. In January 2010, TED.com began including videos of TEDMED talks on the TED website.[96]

The second Hodosh-owned edition of TEDMED took place in October 2010, also in San Diego. It sold out for a second year and attracted notable healthcare leaders and Hollywood celebrities.[97]

In 2011, Jay Walker and a group of executives and investors purchased TEDMED from Hodosh for $16 million with future additional payments of as much as $9 million. The conference was then moved to Washington, DC.[98]

TEDWomen[edit]

TEDWomen is a three-day conference.[99] Established in 2010, TEDWomen features speakers focused on women-oriented themes, including gender issues and reproductive health.[100][101] There are over 130 TEDWomen Talks available[102] to watch on the TED website. Past speakers include former president Jimmy Carter,[103]Hillary Clinton,[104]Sheryl Sandberg,[105]Madeleine Albright,[106]Nancy Pelosi[107] and Halla Tómasdóttir.[108][109]

TEDYouth[edit]

TEDYouth talks are aimed at middle school and high school students and feature information from youth innovators.[110]

Other programs[edit]

  • [email protected] — A program that leverages TED content to inspire new ways of working in professional settings. This program provides ways for organizations and companies to license TED content for use in learning and talent development contexts.[111]
  • TED Books — These are original books from TED. The initiative began in January 2011 as an ebook series and re-launched in September 2014 with its first book in print.[112]
  • TedEd Clubs — An education based initiative to get young people (ages 8 to 18) to share their ideas with peers and others by giving a TED-like presentation on a topic. TED provides curricula and limited support for the Clubs free of charge.[113]
  • TED Salon — Smaller evening-length events with speakers and performers.[114]
  • TED Radio Hour — A radio program,[115] with audio downloads and a podcast RSS feed,[116] hosted by Manoush Zomorodi,[117] previously Guy Raz and co-produced with NPR. Each episode uses multiple TED Talks to examine a common theme.[118] The first episode was broadcast in 2012.[119][120]
  • TEDx Talks is a YouTube channel[121] which is ranked #1 globally for a non profit (2021).[122] The channel has approximately 30m subscribers and 800m views with estimated revenues of between $24.5K - $391.6K monthly.[123]
  • TED also offers other podcasts such as Sincerely, X (featuring anonymous TED Talks)[124] and Work / Life which discusses creative workplaces.[125]

Criticism[edit]

Pricing[edit]

Frank Swain, a deaf journalist, refused to participate in a TEDx event without getting paid. He said that it is unacceptable that TED, which is a non-profit organization, charges TED attendees $6,000 but prohibits organisers of the smaller, independently organized TEDx events from paying anything to speakers.[126] Speakers and performers at official TED events are not compensated for their talks.[127]

Sarah Lacy of BusinessWeek and TechCrunch wrote in 2010 that TED attendees complained of elitism from a "hierarchy of parties throughout the LA-area with strict lists and security" after the sessions. She gave TED credit for making talks free online or live streamed.[128]

TED Talk content[edit]

Disagreements have also occurred between TED speakers and organizers. In her 2010 TED Talk, comedian Sarah Silverman referred to adopting a "retarded" child. TED organizer Chris Anderson objected via his Twitter account, leading to a Twitter skirmish between them.[129][130]

Also in 2010, statistician Nassim Taleb called TED a "monstrosity that turns scientists and thinkers into low-level entertainers, like circus performers". He claimed TED curators did not initially post his talk "warning about the financial crisis" on their site on purely cosmetic grounds.[131]

Nick Hanauer spoke at TED University, challenging the belief that top income earners in America are the engines of job creation.[132] TED was accused of censoring the talk by not posting it on the website.[133][134] The National Journal reported Chris Anderson had reacted by saying the talk probably ranked as one of the most politically controversial talks they had ever run, and they needed to be careful about when they posted it.[133] Anderson officially responded, indicating that TED only posts one talk every day, selected from many.[135]Forbes staff writer Bruce Upbin described Hanauer's talk as "shoddy and dumb"[136] while New York magazine condemned the conference's move.[137]

Following a TEDx talk by parapsychologist Rupert Sheldrake, TED issued a statement saying their scientific advisors believed that "there is little evidence for some of Sheldrake's more radical claims" made in the talk and recommended that it "should not be distributed without being framed with caution". The video of the talk was moved from the TEDx YouTube channel to the TED blog accompanied by the framing language called for by the advisors. The move and framing prompted accusations of censorship, to which TED responded by saying the accusations were "simply not true" since Sheldrake's talk was still on their website.[138][139] A 2013 talk by Graham Hancock, promoting the use of the drug DMT, was treated in the same way.[140][83]

According to Professor Benjamin Bratton at University of California, San Diego, TED Talks' efforts at fostering progress in socio-economics, science, philosophy, and technology have been ineffective.[141] Chris Anderson responded that some critics have a misconception of TED's goals, and failed to recognise that TED aimed to instill excitement in the audience in the same way the speaker felt it. He stated that TED only wishes to bring news of the significance of certain topics to a large audience.[142]

In popular culture[edit]

The Alien franchise features a fictional portrayal of the year 2023 edition of the TED Conference in the form of a short film called "The Peter Weyland Files: TED Conference, 2023".[143] This was a part of the viral marketing campaign for the Prometheus film.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc"TED: About: Our Organization: How TED works: Who owns TED?". TED: Ideas Worth Sharing. TED Conferences, LLC. Retrieved October 25, 2011.
  2. ^ abcHefferman, Virginia (January 23, 2009). "Confessions of a TED addict". The New York Times. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  3. ^"TED Goes Corporate"Fortune Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  4. ^"History of TED". TED: Ideas Worth Spreading. TED Conferences LLC. Retrieved May 11, 2016.
  5. ^"What's the big idea?". The Guardian. July 24, 2005. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  6. ^"TED Talks". Mashable.com. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  7. ^"Detailed reports - Sapling foundation, New York". nonprofitfacts.com. Non profit facts. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  8. ^"Chris Anderson is the curator of TED". DumboFeather.com. 2011. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  9. ^"The next chapter: TED headed to Vancouver in 2014, TEDActive hitting the slopes of Whistler". TED Blog. February 4, 2013. Retrieved February 5, 2013.
  10. ^"Here's Why TED and TEDx are Appealing". Forbes. June 19, 2012. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  11. ^"Tools". RISE UP/GEAR UP. April 26, 2013. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  12. ^"Speakers". TED: Ideas Worth Spreading. TED Conferences, LLC. Retrieved February 6, 2009.
  13. ^ ab"Jimmy Wales: The birth of Wikipedia". TED (conference). July 2005. Retrieved December 8, 2014.
  14. ^"TED's nonprofit transition". TED (conference). February 2002. Retrieved August 29, 2015.
  15. ^"TEDTalks usage policy". TED.com. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  16. ^ ab"TED Talks List". TED. Retrieved October 9, 2020.
  17. ^"TED profile". Mashable.com. June 27, 2011. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  18. ^ ab"TED reaches its billionth video view!". TED Blog. November 13, 2012. Retrieved December 20, 2014.
  19. ^"TED Talks Usage Policy". www.ted.com. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  20. ^"Remembering Harry Marks, co-founder of the TED Conference". TED Blog. April 27, 2019. Retrieved October 11, 2020.
  21. ^Cadwalladr, Carole TED – the ultimate forum for blue-sky thinking July 4, 2010, The Guardian, Retrieved September 20, 2012.
  22. ^ ab"History of TED | Our Organization | About | TED". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  23. ^"A last hurrah at the Monterey Conference Center, 31 years later". TED Blog. May 27, 2015. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  24. ^May, Tina (February 28, 2008). "Will the TED conference elite yield something concrete for the rest of us?". Monterey County Weekly. Retrieved August 12, 2019.
  25. ^Kim, Victoria (January 16, 2008). "Long Beach to host influential TED conference". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 13, 2010.
  26. ^Brown, Mick (April 29, 2016). "'I was losing $1 million a day, every day for 18 months': Meet Chris Anderson, the man behind TED talks". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved October 11, 2016.
  27. ^Anderson, Chris. "TED's nonprofit transition". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  28. ^"Getting Invited (attendees)". TED: Ideas Worth Spreading. TED Conferences, LLC. Retrieved February 7, 2009.
  29. ^"TED Conference". ted.com. Retrieved September 27, 2017.
  30. ^"How TED Works". TED.com. Retrieved May 18, 2015.
  31. ^Ochoa, Rosmari. "Technology, Entertainment and Design (TED): A case study on how complementary on- and off-line approaches can build community and cultivate platforms for innovation and creativity"(PDF). American University School of Communication. American University. Retrieved May 18, 2015.
  32. ^"Who we are - Our organization - About - TED". TED.com. Retrieved June 19, 2015.
  33. ^"How TED works". TED. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  34. ^Pitoi, Seik (January 17, 2020). "Excellent learning platform". The National (Papua New Guinea). Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  35. ^TED2020 postponed to July 26-30
  36. ^Bruno Giussani. "Day 2: Dave Eggers and Tutoring, Neil Turok and the next African Einstein, Karen Armstrong and the Charter for Compassion", Huffington Post, February 28, 2008
  37. ^"TED Prize | Participate | TED". tedprize.org. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  38. ^"TED Prize 2005". TEDPrize.org. Archived from the original on December 21, 2008. Retrieved November 30, 2008. (primary source)
  39. ^"TED Prize 2006". TEDPrize.org. Archived from the original on December 21, 2008. Retrieved November 30, 2008. (primary source)
  40. ^"TED Prize 2007". TEDPrize.org. Archived from the original on December 21, 2008. Retrieved November 30, 2008. (primary source)
  41. ^"TED Prize 2008". TEDPrize.org. Archived from the original on January 18, 2010. Retrieved November 30, 2008. (primary source)
  42. ^"TED Prize 2009". TEDPrize.org. Archived from the original on December 28, 2011. Retrieved November 30, 2008. (primary source)
  43. ^"TED Prize 2010". TEDPrize.org. Archived from the original on December 24, 2009. Retrieved December 21, 2009. (primary source)
  44. ^"TED Prize 2011". TEDPrize.org. Retrieved October 20, 2010. (primary source)
  45. ^"TED Prize 2012". TEDPrize.org. Archived from the original on March 3, 2012. Retrieved March 1, 2012. (primary source)
  46. ^"TED Prize 2013". TEDPrize.org. Retrieved May 5, 2013. (primary source)
  47. ^"TED Prize 2014". TED. Retrieved March 5, 2014. (primary source)
  48. ^"TED Prize 2015". TED. Retrieved March 21, 2015. (primary source)
  49. ^"TED Prize 2016". TED. Retrieved November 11, 2015. (primary source)
  50. ^"TED Prize 2017". TED. Retrieved December 30, 2016. (primary source)
  51. ^"A gathering place for urban citizens to share innovations and inspire action". City 2.0. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  52. ^"Charmian Gooch: Anti-corruption activist". TED. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  53. ^"Edward Burtynsky inspires sustainability". TED. Retrieved September 17, 2016.
  54. ^"The Audacious Project". The Audacious Project. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  55. ^ abTedeschi, Bob (April 16, 2007). "Giving Away Information, but Increasing Revenue". The New York Times. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  56. ^"TED". YouTube. Retrieved February 12, 2015.
  57. ^Masson, M (December 2014). "Benefits of TED Talks". Canadian Family Physician. 60 (12): 1080. PMC 4264800. PMID 25500595.
  58. ^"2011 Speakers | BiblioTech Program". bibliotech.stanford.edu. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  59. ^"Work". Method. Archived from the original on August 7, 2013. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  60. ^"TED.com". peabodyawards.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  61. ^"TED Review". MacWorld. December 22, 2009. Retrieved December 23, 2009.
  62. ^Kessler, Sarah (June 27, 2011). "With 500 Million Views, TED Talks Provide Hope for Intelligent Internet Video". Mashable. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  63. ^"TED's Chris Anderson". Departures. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  64. ^Savitz, Eric. "Netflix To Stream TED Talks". Forbes. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  65. ^"TED TALKS IN NYC –FEATURING WORLD-RENOWNED TALKS FROM TED.COM – PREMIERES ON NYC LIFE". .nyc.gov. March 15, 2012. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012. Retrieved January 17, 2012.
  66. ^"Past TEDs | Conferences | About | TED". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  67. ^"TEDGlobal>London Tuesday 16 June 2015"(PDF). tedconfblog.files.wordpress.com. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  68. ^Christian, Bonnie. "Ten years on, TEDGlobal is tackling Africa's education crisis". Retrieved May 18, 2018.
  69. ^Cadwalladr, Carole TEDGlobal 2012: 'The more you give away the more you get back', The Guardian, June 24, 2012. Retrieved December 6, 2012.
  70. ^"TED Open Translation Project". Retrieved February 12, 2015.
  71. ^"2014 annual report: TED Open Translation Project | Translate | Participate | TED". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  72. ^"Dashboard - TED | Amara". amara.org. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  73. ^"At 1-Year Anniversary, TED's Open Translation Project Celebrates More Than 7,000 Completed Translations From 4,000 Volunteers in 75 Languages". prnewswire.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  74. ^"Portal:Main - OTPedia". translations.ted.org. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  75. ^"TED Translators - YouTube". youtube.org. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  76. ^Rosenbloom, Stephanie (September 24, 2010). "A Conference Makes Learning Free (and Sexy)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  77. ^"TEDx Rules | Before you start | Organize a local TEDx event | Participate | TED". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  78. ^"TEDxIIT". mypages.iit.edu. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  79. ^"TED | TEDx Events | TEDxTalks". tedxtalks.ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  80. ^Mark Fidelman (June 19, 2012). "Here's Why TED and TEDx are So Incredibly Appealing (infographic)". Forbes. Retrieved February 12, 2015.
  81. ^"Achievement unlocked: TEDx celebrates 100,000 talks!". TED Blog. October 19, 2017. Retrieved October 30, 2017.
  82. ^Heller, Nathan Listen and Learn, The New Yorker, July 9, 2012. Retrieved September 2, 2012.
  83. ^ abTED Staff (March 18, 2013). "Graham Hancock and Rupert Sheldrake, a fresh take". TED Blog. Retrieved July 3, 2014.
  84. ^"About". TEDx Music Project. May 12, 2011. Retrieved February 12, 2015.
  85. ^"TEDXYouth | Search Results | TED.com". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  86. ^Benavides, Vania (February 10, 2015). "About Tedx Santa Cruz". Tedx Santa Cruz. Retrieved February 10, 2015.
  87. ^"Is This The Future Of TED?". Forbes. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  88. ^"Application tips | Apply to be a TED Fellow | TED Fellows Program | Participate | TED". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  89. ^Rowan, David (July 18, 2011). "Wired meets 2011's TED Fellows". Wired. Archived from the original on July 20, 2011. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  90. ^"Lessons Worth Sharing". TED-Ed. Retrieved August 4, 2018.
  91. ^"Podcasts that inspire with the head of TED, Chris Anderson". CBC Radio. September 12, 2019. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  92. ^"Top 10 TED Talks for Inventors". Inventors Digest. April 24, 2018. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  93. ^Asay, Matt (February 22, 2016). "Why Linux creator Linus Torvalds doesn't really care about open source". Inventors Digest. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  94. ^Rogers, Brooke A. (September 5, 2019). "Monica Lewinsky gets the last laugh". Washington Examiner. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  95. ^Wiener, Anna (April 27, 2019). "Jack Dorsey's TED Interview and the End of an Era". The New Yorker. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  96. ^ ab"TEDMED: a new partnership". TED Blog. January 19, 2010. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  97. ^TEDMED (December 8, 2010), Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne with Nathaniel Pearson at TEDMED 2010, retrieved June 18, 2016
  98. ^Ostrovsky, Gene (April 14, 2011). "TEDMED Sold to Jay Walker, Richard Saul Wurman Says Adios". Medgadget.
  99. ^"TED | TEDWomen". ted.com. October 8, 2018.
  100. ^Howard, Caroline. "Own Your Own Success, Says Sheryl Sandberg". Forbes. Retrieved December 8, 2010.
  101. ^"Home". TEDxUCLWomen. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  102. ^"TED | TEDWomen Search". TED. October 8, 2018.
  103. ^"Jimmy Carter | TEDWomen 2015". TED. May 2015.
  104. ^"TED Blog exclusive: Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at TEDWomen". TED Blog. December 10, 2010.
  105. ^"Sheryl Sandberg | TEDWomen 2010". TED. December 2010.
  106. ^"Madeleine Albright | TEDWomen 2010". TED. December 2010.
  107. ^"On sincere and authentic leadership | Nancy Pelosi". TED Archive | YouTube. April 3, 2017.
  108. ^"Halla Tómasdóttir | TEDWomen 2010". TED. December 2010.
  109. ^"Halla Tómasdóttir | TEDWomen 2016". TED. October 2016.
  110. ^"TEDYouth". ted.com. Retrieved August 4, 2018.
  111. ^"[email protected] : Inspire new ways of working". tedatwork.ted.com. Retrieved May 14, 2021.
  112. ^"TED Books | Read | TED". ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  113. ^"Lessons Worth Sharing | TED-Ed". ed.ted.com. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  114. ^"About TED: Conferences". TED. Retrieved April 19, 2016.
  115. ^"TED Radio Hour". NPR.org. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  116. ^"TED Radio Hour". feeds.npr.org. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  117. ^
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TED_(conference)

Ted 2

2015 film by Seth MacFarlane

Ted 2 is a 2015 American comedy film directed and written by Seth MacFarlane, Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild, and is a sequel to the 2012 film Ted. The film stars Mark Wahlberg and MacFarlane, and follows the talking teddy bear Ted as he fights for civil rights in order to be recognized as a person. The film also stars Amanda Seyfried, with Giovanni Ribisi and Jessica Barth reprising their roles and John Slattery and Morgan Freeman joining the cast.

Principal photography began in Massachusetts in July 2014. Ted 2 was released on June 26, 2015, by Universal Pictures. The film grossed over $216 million and received mixed reviews from critics.

Plot[edit]

John Bennett has been divorced from Lori for six months. Meanwhile, his best friend Ted the teddy bear marries his girlfriend, Tami-Lynn. Following a heated argument after being married a year, they decide to have a child (possibly after the events in the first film). As Ted does not have sperm, John agrees to help find a donor. They ask Sam J. Jones but he declines due to a sperm count of one. Then they unsuccessfully try to break into Tom Brady's house and steal his sperm. Ultimately, John offers to donate his sperm.

Despite Ted and John's efforts, Tami-Lynn's historical drug use has rendered her infertile (despite having been clean for an extended period of time) and they decide to adopt. The background checks put Ted's legal status as a person into question. The state authorities of Massachusetts declare Ted property rather than a person; consequently he loses his job, his credit card and bank accounts are frozen and his marriage to Tami-Lynn is forcibly annulled.

John suggests that they take the state to court. They ask the best lawyer they can find, but he offers to assign their case pro bono to his niece Samantha, a novice lawyer. They are initially reluctant, but bond over their love of marijuana as they prepare to present the case.

Meanwhile, Donny, Ted's life-long stalker, is a janitor at the headquarters of toy company Hasbro, in New York City. He convinces the company CEO to hire an expert attorney to ensure that Ted maintains his status as property, leaving him open to seizure by the firm to create more living teddy bears.

Despite Samantha's best efforts, the court rules against Ted. Disheartened and desperate, the trio contact Patrick Meighan, a highly respected civil rights attorney, to help overturn the court's decision. Driving to Manhattan, the trio meet Meighan, who is sympathetic to Ted's plight but refuses the case, as he believes Ted has not significantly contributed to humanity due to his lifestyle.

However, Ted, angry at the injustice and jealous of Samantha and John's relationship, stomps off. Donny follows him as he wanders into the New York Comic-Con. Once inside, Donny, disguised as Raphael attempts to kidnap Ted, who flees and contacts John for help. John and Samantha arrive and find Ted, just as Donny is about to cut him open. As they make their escape, Donny severs the cables holding up a model of the USS Enterprise with a knife and it swings towards Ted. John pushes Ted out of the way, takes the hit, gets knocked unconscious, and falls into a coma. Ted identifies Donny from a group of Ninja Turtle cosplayers through his irresistible urge to dance to I Think We're Alone Now by Tiffany and he is arrested.

At the hospital, John is still in a coma, and he flatlines. The next day, the doctor informs Sam, Ted and Tami-Lynn that John had died, shocking the group. In the room, the group is tearfully saying goodbye to John. However, he wakes up and scares the group, and Ted finds out that John had faked being dead (as if to be silly) as payback for Ted pretending to be brain dead. After some talking, the group rejoices when John recovers. Patrick Meighan decides to take the case, inspired by John's selflessness and Ted's emotions over John, his friend who barely avoided death. Meighan gets the ruling overturned by demonstrating that Ted is self-aware, that he feels complex emotions, and is capable of empathy. Outside the courthouse, Ted re-proposes to Tami-Lynn. After they are remarried, Ted and Tami-Lynn, adopting the surname of "Clubber Lang", adopt a baby boy, who they name Apollo Creed, while John and Samantha happily pursue their own relationship.

In a post-credits scene, a customer (Liam Neeson) who had previously purchased a box of Trix wanders back into the supermarket, visibly injured. He leaves the Trix behind and exits with a look of betrayal (though it is never revealed whether the customer was actually involved in the first place).

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

During the 2012 American Dad!Comic-Con panel, MacFarlane stated that he would be open to a sequel to Ted.[15] In September 2012, chief executive Steve Burke said that the studio would be looking to make a sequel to Ted "as soon as possible".[16] In January 2013, on Anderson Live, Wahlberg confirmed that a sequel was in the works and that it would be the first sequel in his career, while also revealing that he and Ted (as voiced by MacFarlane) would appear at the 85th Academy Awards.[17] On October 2, 2013, it was announced Ted 2 would be released on June 26, 2015.[18]

Initially the storyline for the film was quite different and involved John and Ted's attempt to smuggle pot across the country,[19] but, due to concerns that the concept was too similar to then recently released We're the Millers, the concept was scrapped and the storyline was overhauled to one inspired by John Jakes' North and South series as well as the life of Dred Scott.[19] During the period when the film was about drug smuggling, Mila Kunis' character was still in the sequel; however, when the storyline was changed, it required a lawyer to be the female lead and there wasn't room for Kunis's character.[19]

On February 14, 2014, Amanda Seyfried was cast as the female lead.[20] On June 17, 2014, Jessica Barth was confirmed to reprise her role as Tami-Lynn.[21] In August and September 2014, it was announced that Patrick Warburton would return as John's co-worker Guy,[8] and that Morgan Freeman,[22]Nana Visitor,[14]Michael Dorn,[9]Dennis Haysbert,[12]Liam Neeson[13] and John Slattery had joined the cast.[7]

Principal photography began on July 28, 2014, and ended on November 13, 2014.[23][24][25]

Soundtrack[edit]

The film's soundtrack was released by Republic Records on June 26, 2015.[26] It features the score by Walter Murphy and songs co-written by Seth MacFarlane and Murphy, including "Mean Ol’ Moon", which is performed by Amanda Seyfried and Norah Jones separately. The soundtrack also includes "Mess Around" by Ray Charles, "One Foot in Front of the Other" by Bone Symphony and "New York" by Alfred Newman.

Track listing

All tracks by Walter Murphy except where indicated.

Release[edit]

On January 27, 2015, the film's teaser poster was released.[27] This was followed two days later by its trailer.[28] The film premiered on June 24, 2015, in New York City, with its general release two days later.[29]

Home media[edit]

Ted 2 was released on DVD and Blu-ray on December 15, 2015 in the United States by Universal Studios Home Entertainment.[30] Both formats contained a theatrical version (115 minutes) and an "unrated" extended version (125 minutes), containing 10 minutes of extra footage. It was released on DVD and Blu-ray in the United Kingdom and Ireland on November 23, 2015, both formats containing the two versions.

On May 3, 2016, Ted vs. Flash Gordon: The Ultimate Collection was released on Blu-ray plus Digital HD, featuring Flash Gordon and the unrated versions of Ted and Ted 2.[31]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Ted 2 grossed $81.5 million in North America and $135.2 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $216.7 million, against a budget of $68 million.[5]

In the United States and Canada, Ted 2 opened on the same day as the family adventure film Max, across 3,441 theaters. It made $2.6 million from its Thursday night showings from 2,647 theaters,[32] and $13.2 million on its opening day.[33] In its opening weekend, Ted 2 earned $33.5 million, finishing third at the box office behind Jurassic World ($54.5 million) and Inside Out ($52.3 million).[34] The opening total was a disappointment, considering the film's initial projected opening of $45–50 million, and its predecessor's $54.4 million opening three years prior.[34] It was director MacFarlane's second consecutive underperforming opening, following 2014's A Million Ways to Die in the West, which opened to $16.8 million.[34]

Outside North America, the film earned an estimated $20 million in its opening weekend from 26 countries. It opened in number two in Germany ($3.7 million), Russia and the CIS ($3.5 million) and Australia ($3.3 million).[35]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 45% based on 206 reviews with an average rating of 5.28/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Ted 2 reunites Mark Wahlberg and Seth MacFarlane for another round of sophomoric, scatological humor -- and just as before, your enjoyment will depend on your tolerance for all of the above."[36] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 48 out of 100 based on 38 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[37] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B+" on an A+ to F scale, lower than the "A-" earned by its predecessor.[38]

James Berardinelli of ReelViews gave the film two out of four stars, saying "It would be disingenuous for me to claim that Ted 2 isn't funny. Although I was often bored by the plodding direction of the story, I laughed from time-to-time."[39] Chris Nashawaty of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a C+, saying "You realize what it must be like to be trapped in detention with a bunch of 15-year-old boys who think there's nothing more hilarious than repeating the same jokes about porn, pot, and pulling your pud over and over again. It's funny, until it's not."[40] Bill Goodykoontz of The Arizona Republic gave the film two out of five stars, saying "The film, like most of MacFarlane's work, is a mix of occasional laugh-out-loud moments - there are some here - and cringe-worthy misfires that play a lot more tone-deaf than he seems to intend."[41] Brian Truitt of USA Today gave the film two out of four stars, saying "MacFarlane and co-writers Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild have a gift for referential riffs, but the plot is the thinnest of narratives just to connect all the comedy bits."[42] Stephen Whitty of the Newark Star-Ledger gave the film one and a half stars out of four, saying "Sure, MacFarlane can write simple jokes as long as the 'f' key on his laptop holds out. Some of them are even funny. But a lot of them don't pay off, and most trod the same well-worn territory -- potheads, practical jokes, politically incorrect cliches."[43] Lindsey Bahr of the Associated Press gave the film a negative review, saying "In an admirable effort to go a different route, MacFarlane has instead done something hopelessly bizarre: He's given his film too much sincerity and story, and it practically crushes whatever fun does exist."[44]

Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle gave the film three out of four stars, saying "MacFarlane is cynical, but he's not a cynic, and there are moments in Ted 2 where you can sense a longing for the gentler and more upbeat entertainment of an earlier generation."[45] Soren Anderson of The Seattle Times gave the film two out of four stars, saying "In the midst of comedy, seriousness. The combination feels forced. A more disciplined and smarter director might have been able to successfully blend the two elements, but crude dude MacFarlane hasn't the skill to bring it off."[46] Dan Callahan of The Wrap gave the film a negative review, saying "Bad taste needs to be more honest and more all-inclusive if it's to make a lasting impression, and MacFarlane's bad taste here is both too wishy-washy and too knee-jerk cruel to really make any impact."[47] Manohla Dargis of The New York Times gave the film a negative review, saying "Mr. MacFarlane can be funny, but Ted 2 is insultingly lazy hack work that is worth discussing primarily because of how he tries and fails to turn race, and specifically black men, into comedy fodder."[48] Jacob Hall of New York Daily News gave the film one out of five stars, saying "Once again, you will believe that a talking CGI stuffed animal can be a racist, hateful monster with no redeeming qualities ... but his greatest sin is that he's not funny."[49] Peter Howell of the Toronto Star gave the film two out of four stars, saying "If you didn't see and laugh at the first Ted, and maybe also at MacFarlane's button-pushing TV series Family Guy, then another movie deserves your entertainment dollars."[50] A.A. Dowd of The A.V. Club gave the film a C+, saying "Ted 2 strikes a sometimes-awkward balance between sincerity and cheap provocation. It also forgets that the real draw of the first film wasn't Ted himself, but Wahlberg, whose sweet-lug routine scored a lot of belly laughs."[51]

Accolades[edit]

Possible sequel[edit]

In June 2015, Collider asked if the studio was already planning a third film, MacFarlane replied: "It's all based on appetite. If Ted 2 does as well as the first one, it means people want to see more of these characters. If that happens, then there would likely be a Ted 3. The franchise, to me, is one that's more character-based than premise-based. If you look at it like episodes in television, if you have characters that people like and they want to see them, again and again, you can tell any number of different stories. If there's a desire for it, then yeah, we would do a Ted 3."[56]

On October 27, 2015, during an interview on Today MacFarlane, again, didn't rule out the possibility of Ted 3, stating: "We don't know, I like to kind of have some space between Ted [films], so it's possible there will be another one but there are no immediate plans."[57]

On September 13, 2021, Macfarlane posted an image to Instagram of the stuffed bear used in the Ted movies captioned “The original Ted stuffy mentally preparing for his return”, hinting at the possibility of a sequel. [58]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Ted 2 (15)". British Board of Film Classification. June 24, 2015. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  2. ^"'Ted 2' lags behind 'Jurassic World,' 'Inside Out'". US News. June 28, 2015. Retrieved December 12, 2015.
  3. ^McClintock, Pamela (June 26, 2015). "Box Office: 'Jurassic World' Hits $500M; 'Ted 2' Suffers Bear Market With $32.9M". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 12, 2015.
  4. ^CBS/AP June 29, 2015, 8:27 AM (June 29, 2015). ""Ted 2" lags behind "Jurassic World," "Inside Out" at box office". CBS News. Retrieved December 12, 2015.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ ab"Ted 2 (2015)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  6. ^JURASSIC WORLD, SEVENTH SON, TED 2, FIFTY SHADES OF GREY Super Bowl Spots
  7. ^ ab"John Slattery joins 'Ted 2'". EW.com. Retrieved September 27, 2014.
  8. ^ abFleming, Mike Jr. (August 20, 2014). "Patrick Warburton Back For 'Ted' Sequel". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved August 21, 2014.
  9. ^ abMacFarlane, Seth (September 16, 2014). "Hilarious work in Ted 2 today by @paddywarbucks and @akaWorf!". Twitter. Retrieved September 23, 2014.
  10. ^Boren, Cindy (November 6, 2014). "Tom Brady lands 'Ted 2,' 'Entourage' roles, brings Gronk along". WashingtonPost.com. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  11. ^ ab"Dennis Haysbert Joins Both Dead Rising and Ted 2". September 18, 2014. Retrieved September 23, 2014.
  12. ^ abMacFarlane, Seth (September 24, 2014). "Yesterday Liam Neeson, today Morgan Freeman. Not a bad week for #Ted2". Twitter. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  13. ^ abVisitor, Nana (November 10, 2014). "Had such a great time on Ted 2 today. What a guy, what a bear". Twitter. Retrieved July 13, 2015.
  14. ^Patten, Dominic (July 14, 2012). "Comic-Con - Seth MacFarlane Says "I'd Be Open To Making Ted 2"". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  15. ^"BBC News - Bourne Legacy sequel confirmed". BBC News. Bbc.co.uk. September 14, 2012. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  16. ^Franich, Darren (January 17, 2013). "Mark Wahlberg and Ted to appear at Oscars - VIDEO". Insidemovies.ew.com. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  17. ^"'Ted 2′ Gets June 2015 Release Date". Deadline Hollywood. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  18. ^ abcRadish, Christina (June 23, 2015). "Seth MacFarlane Talks TED 2 and 3, the Cast, and Political Correctness". Collider. Retrieved August 14, 2015.
  19. ^"Amanda Seyfried Set By Seth MacFarlane For 'Ted' Sequel". Deadline Hollywood. February 24, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2014.
  20. ^"Jessica Barth Set to Return as Foul-Mouthed Girlfriend Tami-Lynn in 'Ted 2' (Exclusive)". TheWrap. June 17, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  21. ^"Morgan Freeman Lands Juicy Role in 'Ted 2′ (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. September 10, 2014. Retrieved September 10, 2014.
  22. ^MacFarlane, Seth (July 28, 2014). "1st day of filming on Ted 2: Back in the Habit". Twitter. Retrieved July 13, 2015.
  23. ^"Seth MacFarlane tweets the start of 'Ted 2'". The Boston Globe. June 28, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  24. ^MacFarlane, Seth (November 13, 2014). "[Untitled image]". Twitter. Retrieved November 17, 2014.
  25. ^"Ted 2 (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)". iTunes. Apple. June 26, 2015.
  26. ^Doty, Meriah (January 27, 2015). "'Ted 2' Poster Is Harbinger of Crude Jokes to Come". Yahoo. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
  27. ^Denham, Jess (January 29, 2015). "Ted 2 trailer: Seth MacFarlane returns for more mischief in first look at new movie". The Independent. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
  28. ^Emery, Debbie (June 24, 2015). "Seth MacFarlane, Mark Wahlberg, Amanda Seyfried Get Cuddly at 'Ted 2' NYC Premiere (Photos)". The Wrap. Retrieved June 25, 2015.
  29. ^"Ted 2 Blu-ray". Blu-ray.com. November 21, 2015. Retrieved December 12, 2015.
  30. ^"Ted vs. Flash Gordon: The Ultimate Collection". Blu-ray.com. Retrieved August 17, 2016.
  31. ^Pamela McClintock (June 26, 2015). "Box Office: 'Ted 2' Opens to Strong $2.6M Thursday Night". The Hollywood Reporter. (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  32. ^Keith Simanton (June 25, 2015). "'Jurassic' and 'Inside' Adjust 'Teds Weekend". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  33. ^ abcKeith Simanton (June 28, 2015). "'Jurassic' Holds Off Challengers". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  34. ^Nancy Tartaglione (June 29, 2015). "'Terminator: Genisys' Lords Over 'Salvation'; Dinos Mighty With $84.3M More; 'Minions' Well Outpacing 'DM2′ – Intl Box Office Final". Deadline Hollywood. (Penske Media Corporation). Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  35. ^"Ted 2". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 14, 2018.
  36. ^"Ted 2". Metacritic. Retrieved April 4, 2020.
  37. ^Anthony D'Alessandro (June 27, 2015). "Pixar Girl In Staring Contest With Dinos For No. 1, 'Ted 2′ Falls Off The Wagon, 'Max' Is A Good Dog". Deadline Hollywood. (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  38. ^James Berardinelli. "Ted 2 | Reelviews Movie Reviews". Reelviews.net. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  39. ^Nashawaty, Chris. "'Ted 2': EW review". EW.com. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  40. ^"Review: 'Ted 2' gives us more (and less) of the same". Azcentral.com. April 22, 2015. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  41. ^"Review: Grin and bear 'Ted 2' hijinks". Usatoday.com. June 23, 2015. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  42. ^Stephen Whitty. "'Ted 2' review: Mark Wahlberg grins, and bears it". NJ.com. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  43. ^The Associated Press (May 27, 2015). "Movie review: Sincerity, story crush 'Ted 2'". masslive.com. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  44. ^Mick LaSalle (March 11, 2015). "'Ted 2' — lowdown and very funny". SFGate. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  45. ^Andersen, Soren (June 25, 2015). "'Ted 2': The crude little dude is back". The Seattle Times. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  46. ^"'Ted 2' Review: Seth MacFarlane's Bad-Taste Humor Plays It Safe (and Sexist)". Thewrap.com. June 24, 2015. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  47. ^"Review: In 'Ted 2,' the Foulmouthed Bear Tries to Prove He's Human". The New York Times. June 23, 2015. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  48. ^"'Ted 2' review: Seth McFarlane scrapes bottom of barrel". NY Daily News. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  49. ^"Ted 2 returns with unbearably crude humour and cheap laughs: review". Thestar.com. March 16, 2015. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  50. ^A.A. Dowd. "Review: Ted 2 gets filthier but less charming". Avclub.com. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  51. ^"5th AACTA Awards - Feature Film Nominees". AACTA Awards. Archived from the original on October 31, 2015. Retrieved November 12, 2015.
  52. ^"2016 Nominees & Winners". People's Choice Awards. Retrieved October 3, 2015.
  53. ^Author Jamie Lovett @JamieLovett (March 8, 2016). "Deadpool, Avengers, And Star Wars Nominated For MTV Movie Awards". Comicbook.com.
  54. ^"The 42nd Annual Saturn Awards nominations are announced for 2016!". Saturn Awards. February 24, 2016. Retrieved March 4, 2016.
  55. ^Radish, Christina (June 23, 2015). "Seth MacFarlane Talks TED 2 and 3, the Cast, and Political Correctness". Collider. Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  56. ^"Seth MacFarlane not ruling out 'Ted 3,' but says 'no immediate plans' on September 12 2021 Seth MacFarlane posted on his Instagram page of the Ted bear stating its "preparing for a return"". TODAY.com. Retrieved December 3, 2019.
  57. ^"Seth Macfarlane Instagram post". instagram.com. Retrieved September 13, 2021.

External links[edit]

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Ted 2
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_2
  1. Zoosk vs hinge
  2. Osrs max guide
  3. Acura tl trims
Ted (film)
Ted poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster with original release date
Directed bySeth MacFarlane
Produced byJohn Jacobs
Scott Stuber
Seth MacFarlane
Wellesley Wild
Jason Clark
Written bySeth MacFarlane
Music byWalter Murphy
CinematographyMichael Barrett
StudioMedia Rights Capital
Fuzzy Door Productions
Smart Entertainment
Bluegrass Films
Distributed byUniversal Pictures
Release dateJune 29, 2012 (U.S., English)
Running time106 minutes (theatrical version)
115 minutes (extended version)
Budget$50[1]–$65 million[2]

Ted, stylized as ted, is a 2012 American comedy film, directed by Seth MacFarlane and written by John Jacobs, Scott Stuber, MacFarlane, Wellesley Wild, and Jason Clark. It stars Mark Wahlberg as John Bennett, Mila Kunis as Lori Collins, and MacFarlane as the voice of Ted. It features Giovanni Ribisi as Donny, Joel McHale as Rex, Jessica Barth as Tami-Lynn McCafferty, Aedin Mincks as Robert, and Sam J. Jones as himself.

The film is MacFarlane's feature-length directorial debut,[2] produced by Media Rights Capital and distributed by Universal Pictures. It was released on June 29, 2012, and received generally positive reviews and was a commercial success, becoming the 12th highest-grossing film of 2012, the highest-grossing R-rated film of the year, and the highest-grossing original R-rated comedy of all time.[3][4][5] The film also received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song.

A sequel Ted 2 was released on June 26, 2015.

Plot[]

In 1985, eight-year-old John Bennett is an only child living in Norwood, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, who wished for his new Christmas gift, a jumbo teddy bear named Ted, to come to life and become his friend. The wish coincides with a shooting star and comes true; word spread and Ted was briefly a celebrity.

27 years later, John, now 35, and Ted are still living in Boston and are still staunch companions enjoying a hedonistic life. John is dating Lori Collins, who is from Philadelphia. As their anniversary approaches, Lori hopes to marry John but feels he could not move forward with Ted around. John is hesitant about making Ted leave, but he is persuaded to act when they find Ted at home with a group of prostitutes.

John finds Ted his own apartment and a job at a grocery store, where Ted begins dating his co-worker Tami-Lynn. Lori learns that John has been skipping work, using her as an excuse, to continue to spend most of his time with Ted. John and Lori are invited to a party put on by Lori's womanizing manager Rex, but Ted lures John away to a party at his apartment with the offer to meet Sam J. Jones, the star of their favorite film, Flash Gordon. John intends to stay only a few minutes but gets caught up in the occasion. Lori finds John there and breaks up with him. John blames Ted for ruining his life and banishes him.

John and Ted confront each other about their ruined friendship and they fight but manage to reconcile after a violent brawl in their hotel room. To repair John's relationship with Lori, Ted arranges for an old lover, singer Norah Jones, to help by having John express his love for Lori with a song during her concert. He does an off-key rendition of Octopussy theme song, All Time High, by Rita Coolidge and is booed offstage. Lori is touched by the attempt and returns to her apartment where Ted confesses to his role in John's relapse and offers to leave them alone forever if she talks to John.

Lori is persuaded, but Ted is kidnapped by Donny, an obsessive stalker who idolized Ted as a child. Donny plans to make Ted his brutish son Robert's new toy. Ted manages to reach a phone to contact John but is immediately recaptured. Realizing Ted is in danger, John and Lori locate Donny's residence and track him to rescue Ted. The chase leads to Fenway Park, where John punches Robert, but during the chase, Ted is damaged and falls onto the field ripped entirely in half. A police car arrives, forcing Donny to flee. John and Lori gather Ted's stuffing and Ted relays his wish that John be happy with Lori before dying from his injuries.

Unable to accept Ted's death, a distraught John and Lori attempt to repair Ted, which proves useless. Feeling saddened about the incident, Lori makes a wish on a shooting star. The next morning, John hangs his head while looking over Ted's dead body. Ted is magically restored and reconciles with John and Lori, encouraging them to resume their relationship. John and Lori are married (with Sam Jones as the presiding minister), and Ted comfortably accepts having a life of his own as he and Tami-Lynn continued their love affair. Sam Jones attempts to restart his career and moves into a studio apartment with Brandon Routh. Rex gives up his pursuit of Lori, goes into a deep depression, and dies of Lou Gehrig's disease. Donny gets arrested by the Boston Police Department for kidnapping Ted, but police cannot arrest him as kidnapping a bear toy is not illegal. Robert hires a personal trainer, loses a significant amount of weight, and goes on to become Taylor Lautner.

Cast[]

Voices[]

Cast notes[]

  • Before the film was released, young Ted's voice actors were rumored to have been Danny Anderson (who was also rumored to have portrayed young John) and Zachary Gordon. Afterwards, it was confirmed that the real voice actor is Zane Cowans.
  • It was also rumored that Ray Romano appeared as himself and Alec Baldwin appeared as a character named Dan, but these were complete errors.
  • Originally, John's parents' names were intended to be Joe and Gina, but their names were changed to Steve and Helen.

Production[]

Seth MacFarlane's directorial debut is a live-action effort, with computer animation handled by visual effects facilities Tippett Studio and Iloura. MacFarlane wrote the screenplay with his Family Guy colleagues Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild.[6] MacFarlane announced the movie in an episode of Conan on February 10, 2011.

Filming began in May 2011 in Boston and Swampscott, both in Massachusetts.[7]

Its North American release was scheduled for July 13, 2012, but this was changed to June 29, following the delay of G.I. Joe: Retaliation.[8] The movie was released in Australia on July 5[9] and on August 1 in the United Kingdom. [10]

Reception[]

Critical reception[]

Ted has received positive reviews, with critics praising Seth MacFarlane's comic performance, as well as Mark Wahlberg's portrayal of John Bennett. The film currently has a 70% rating on Rotten Tomatoes with 181 reviews, with an average score of 6.4 / 10, saying "Ted's "romance versus bromance" plot is familiar, but the movie's held aloft by the high-concept central premise and a very funny (albeit inconsistent) script".[11] Based on the top critics, the film holds a 67% "fresh" rating based on 12 reviews, with an average score of 6.9 / 10. Review aggregate Metacritic has given the movie a weighted score of 62, based on 37 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews."[12]

Roger Ebert gave the movie a 3.5 stars citing the movie as "the best comedy screenplay so far [this year]," also praising the film on the fact that it "doesn't run out of steam".

Nathan Rabin of The A. V. Club gave Ted a B grade.[13]

Brent MacNight of Beyond Hollywood commented on the jokes, "Some of these jokes hit, some jokes miss.[14]

On the other hand, A. O. Scott of The New York Times called Ted "boring, lazy and wildly unoriginal."[15]

Box office[]

As of August 20, 2012, the film had earned $351,272,582, of which $213,064,385 was in North America and $138,208,197 in foreign markets.[16]

The film earned $2.6 million in midnight showings.[17] For its opening day, Ted scored one of the best R-rated comedy debuts ever since The Hangover with an estimated $20.2 million.[18][16] The film earned a total of $54.4 million in its opening weekend in the U.S. and Canada, well over 2nd-place Magic Mike's $39.2 million.[19] Its overall weekend gross set a record for the highest original R-rated comedy opening in history.[20]

The film earned $14.3 million in the United Kingdom, making it the 3rd-best debut ever for a Universal movie behind Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason and King Kong. It also had a $7.4 million launch in Germany and had the best Hollywood comedy debut ever in Russia, grossing $5.5 million.[21] In Spain, it opened with $2.3 million, which is the highest ever for an original R-rated comedy.[22]

It also debuted at No. 1 in Australia and New Zealand, grossing nearly $35 million and $3 million so far.[23]

Release[]

Home media[]

Ted was released on DVD and Blu-ray in the United States on December 11, 2012 by Universal Studios Home Entertainment. Both formats were released in Australia on November 21, 2012, in an "Extended Edition".[24] It was released on Blu-ray and DVD in the UK on November 26, 2012.

Accolades[]

Award
(ceremony)
Category Recipients and nominees Result Ref.
Phoenix Film Critics Society Award
(2012)
Breakthrough Performance Behind the Camera Seth MacFarlaneNominated
Teen Choice Awards
(2012)
Choice Summer Movie: Comedy or Music TedNominated [25]
Choice Movie Voice Seth MacFarlane as Ted Nominated
Choice Movie Chemistry Seth MacFarlane and Mark WahlbergNominated
Academy Awards
(85th)
Best Original Song "Everybody Needs a Best Friend" - Seth MacFarlane and Walter MurphyNominated [26]
People's Choice Awards
(39th)
Favorite Comedy Movie TedWon [27]
Empire Award
(18th)
Best Comedy TedWon
MTV Movie Awards
(2013)
Movie of the Year TedNominated [28]
Best Female Performance Mila KunisNominated
Best Shirtless Performance Seth MacFarlane Nominated
Best Kiss Mila Kunis and Mark Wahlberg Nominated
Best Fight Seth MacFarlane and Mark Wahlberg Nominated
Best On-Screen Duo Seth MacFarlane and Mark Wahlberg Won
Best WTF Moment Seth MacFarlane Nominated
Saturn Awards
(39th)
Best Fantasy Film TedNominated
Critics' Choice Awards
(18th)
Best Comedy TedNominated
Best Actor in a Comedy Mark Wahlberg Nominated
Best Actress in a Comedy Mila Kunis Nominated
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers
(2013)
Top Box Office Films TedWon
Spike Guys' Choice Awards
(2012 / 2013)
Guy Movie of the Year TedWon
Best Fight Scene Mark Wahlberg Won

Lawsuit[]

On July 16, 2014, Seth MacFarlane was hit with a lawsuit from the production company of Charlie the Abusive Teddy Bear (a series of Internet videos), claiming that Ted infringes on the copyright of its videos due to the Ted bear largely matching the background story, persona, voice tone, attitude, and dialogue of the Charlie bear.[29]

Sequel[]

Main article: Ted 2

A sequel titled Ted 2 was released on June 26, 2015.

Trivia[]

  • Originally, the film due to come out July 13, but following G.I. Joe: Retaliation's delay, it was moved up 2 weeks earlier.
  • Tara Strong makes her first live-action motion picture appearance since National Lampoon's Senior Trip (1995), but she only voiced Ted's "I love you" function.
  • The film has been received favorably from critics, but it has received acclaim from Seth MacFarlane's fans, praising the storyline, voice acting, visual effects, and its crude humor.
  • Unlike MacFarlane's projects, Ted isn't distributed or produced by 20th Century Fox, his main company for making TV shows. Instead, it is handled by Universal Pictures.
  • MacFarlane originally wanted to make Ted into an animated series, in a similar way to his shows Family Guy, American Dad, and The Cleveland Show, as revealed in the behind the scenes.
  • This is MacFarlane's first live-action work, except for Ted, who's animated through motion capture.

References to Family Guy[]

  • During the party scene, Ted mentions Peter Griffin's name.
  • The scene where Lori tells John to give her his car keys after lying to her about visiting Ted is loosely based on "Saving Private Brian," where Chris tells Quagmire to give him the car keys, otherwise, he'll beat him up. But in this movie, Lori just told him to give her the car keys.
  • In addition to Seth MacFarlane (Peter, Stewie, Brian, and various other characters) and Mila Kunis (Meg), several cast members from the series also made minor or cameo appearances, such as, Alex Borstein (Lois and various other characters) as Helen, Patrick Warburton (Joe) as Guy, Ralph Garman (additional cast) as Steve, Tara Strong (various characters until season 4) as Ted's "I love you" voice box, and others from the series made cameo appearances (like Mike Henry and Danny Smith).
  • During the aquarium scene, when Ted is mocking the fishes in a variety of voices, one of them are Stewie's voice.
    • Oddly, Ted and Stewie are both voiced by Seth MacFarlane.
  • During the fight between John and Ted, we can hear some punching sounds from the series.
  • Ted borrows music tones from Family Guy, likely because the music is performed by Walter Murphy (who also performed the show's music).
  • The opening sequence and the ending credits both have a similar letter font from Family Guy.

[]

  • A brief footage of SpongeBob SquarePants from an episode from the show is shown towards the beginning of the film.
  • A footage of Flash Gordon is shown in some scenes.
    • Interestingly, Sam J. Jones made two cameo appearances in the film as himself during Ted's party and as the wedding priest at John and Lori's wedding.
  • A parody footage of Airplane! is seen when John and Lori are talking about how they first met. The only difference is the characters are different.

References[]

Coming soon!

External links[]

  • ↑Template:Documentation subpageTemplate:High-riskTemplate:AWB standard installationTemplate:CsdocTemplate:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

    Usage[]

    Template:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc For references with author credit

    For references without author credit

    Template:EndTemplate:Csdoc

    Template:EndTemplate:Csdoc

    Template:Csdoc

                                                                                                                                 

    Template:Csdoc

                                                                                                                                 

    Template:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

    {{cite web |url = |title = |last = |first = |date = |website = |publisher = |accessdate = }}

    Template:End

    Examples[]

      Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
        Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
          Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
            Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
              Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                Using format
                  Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                  Foreign language and translated title
                    Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                    Using authorlink
                      Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                        Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                          Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                            Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                              Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                Using "archiveurl" and "archivedate" (and optionally "deadurl") for webpages that have been archived
                                  Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                    Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                      Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                      Using quote
                                        Template loop detected: Template:Cite web

                                        Parameters[]

                                        Syntax[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Deprecated[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Description[]

                                        Authors[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Title[]

                                        Template:CsdocTemplate:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

                                        Date[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Publisher[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Series[]

                                        Template:Csdoc Alias: agency.

                                        In-source locations[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        URL[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Anchor[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Identifiers[]

                                        Template:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

                                        Quote[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Editors[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Laysummary[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Display options[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Subscription or registration required[]

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                        Template data[]

                                        Template:TemplateDataHeader

                                        Formats a citation to a website using the provided information such as URL and title. Used only for sources that are not correctly described by the specific citation templates for books, journals, news sources, etc.

                                        ParameterDescriptionTypeStatus
                                        URL

                                        The URL of the online location where the text of the publication can be found

                                        Stringrequired
                                        Source title

                                        The title of the source page on the website; will display with quotation marks added

                                        Stringrequired
                                        Source date

                                        Full date when the source was published; if unknown, use accessdate instead; do not wikilink

                                        Stringoptional
                                        URL access date

                                        The full date when the original URL was accessed; do not wikilink

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Website title

                                        Title of the website; may be wikilinked; will display in italics

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Publisher

                                        Name of the publisher

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional authors

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional authors

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the author; can suffix with a numeral to add additional authors

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the second author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink2'.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the second author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the second author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Others

                                        Used to record other (non-author) contributions to the work, such as 'Illustrated by John Smith' or 'Translated by John Smith'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Month of publication

                                        Name of the month of publication; do not wikilink; use 'date' instead, if day of month is also known

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Year of publication

                                        Year of the source being referenced; use 'date' instead, if month and day are also known

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Original year

                                        Original year of publication; provide specifics

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Editor last name

                                        The surname of the editor; don't wikilink, use 'editor-link'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional editors; alias of 'editor1-last', 'editor', and 'editors'

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Editor first name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the editor; don't wikilink, use 'editor-link'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional editors; alias of 'editor1-first'

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Editor link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the editor; can suffix with a numeral to add additional editors

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Series identifier

                                        Series identifier when the source is part of a series, such as a book series or a journal

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Location of publication

                                        Geographical place of publication; usually not wikilinked; omit when the publication name includes place; alias of 'place'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Place of publication

                                        Publication place shows after title; if 'place' or 'location' are also given, they are displayed before the title prefixed with 'written at'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Publication date

                                        Date of publication when different from the date the work was written; do not wikilink

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Page

                                        Page in the source that supports the content; displays after 'p.'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Pages

                                        Pages in the source that support the content (not an indication of the number of pages in the source; displays after 'pp.'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        No pp

                                        Set to 'y' to suppress the 'p.' or 'pp.' display with 'page' or 'pages' when inappropriate (such as 'Front cover')

                                        Stringoptional
                                        At

                                        May be used instead of 'page' or 'pages' where a page number is inappropriate or insufficient

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Language

                                        The language in which the source is written, if not English; use the full language name; do not use icons or templates

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Translated title

                                        An English language title, if the source cited is in a foreign language; 'language' is recommended

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Type

                                        Additional information about the media type of the source; format in sentence case

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Format

                                        Format of the work referred to by 'url'; examples: PDF, DOC, XLS; do not specify HTML

                                        Stringoptional
                                        arXiv identifier

                                        An identifier for arXive electronic preprints of scientific papers

                                        Stringoptional
                                        AZIN

                                        Amazon Standard Identification Number; 10 characters

                                        Stringoptional
                                        AZIN TLD

                                        ASIN top-level domain for Amazon sites other than the US

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Bibcode

                                        Bibliographic Reference Code (REFCODE); 19 characters

                                        Stringoptional
                                        DOI

                                        Digital Object Identifier; begins with '10.'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        DOI broken date

                                        The date that the DOI was determined to be broken

                                        Stringoptional
                                        ISBN

                                        International Standard Book Number; use the 13-digit ISBN where possible

                                        Stringoptional
                                        ISSN

                                        International Standard Serial Number; 8 characters; may be split into two groups of four using a hyphen

                                        Stringoptional
                                        jfm code

                                        Jahrbuch über die Fortschritte der Mathematik classification code

                                        Stringoptional
                                        JSTOR

                                        JSTOR identifier

                                        Stringoptional
                                        LCCN

                                        Library of Congress Control Number

                                        Stringoptional
                                        MR

                                        Mathematical Reviews identifier

                                        Stringoptional
                                        OCLC

                                        Online Computer Library Center number

                                        Stringoptional
                                        OL

                                        Open Library identifier

                                        Stringoptional
                                        OSTI

                                        Office of Scientific and Technical Information identifier

                                        Stringoptional
                                        PMC

                                        PubMed Center article number

                                        Stringoptional
                                        PMID

                                        PubMed Unique Identifier

                                        Stringoptional
                                        RFC

                                        Request for Comments number

                                        Stringoptional
                                        SSRN

                                        Social Science Research Network

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Zbl

                                        Zentralblatt MATH journal identifier

                                        Stringoptional
                                        id

                                        A unique identifier used where none of the specialized ones are applicable

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Archive URL

                                        The URL of an archived copy of a web page, if or in case the URL becomes unavailable; requires 'archivedate'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Archive date

                                        Date when the original URL was archived; do not wikilink

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Dead URL

                                        If set to 'no', the title display is adjusted; useful for when the URL is archived preemptively but still live

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Quote

                                        Relevant text quoted from the source; displays last, enclosed in quotes; needs to include terminating punctuation

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Ref

                                        An anchor identifier; can be made the target of wikilinks to full references; special value 'harv' generates an anchor suitable for the harv template

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Separator

                                        The punctuation used to separate lists of authors, editors, etc.; a space must be encoded as   do not use an asterisk, colon, or hash mark

                                        Default
                                        .
                                        Stringoptional
                                        Postscript

                                        The closing punctuation for the citation; ignored if 'quote' is defined

                                        Default
                                        .
                                        Stringoptional
                                        Lay URL

                                        URL link to a non-technical summary or review of the source; alias of 'laysummary'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Lay source

                                        Name of the source of the laysummary; displays in italics, preceded by an en dash

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Lay date

                                        Date of the summary; displays in parentheses

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Author mask

                                        Replaces the name of the first author with em dashes or text; set to a numeric value 'n' to set the dash 'n' em spaces wide; set to a text value to display the text without a trailing author separator; for example, 'with' instead

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the third author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink3'.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the third author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the third author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the forth author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink4'.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the forth author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the forth author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the fifth author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink5'.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the fifth author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the sixth author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the sixth author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink6'.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the sixth author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the sixth author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the seventh author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink7'.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the seventh author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the seventh author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the eighth author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink8'.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the eighth author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the eighth author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Last name

                                        The surname of the ninth author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink9'. If nine authors are defined, then only eight will show and 'et al.' will show in place of the last author.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        First name

                                        Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the ninth author; don't wikilink.

                                        Lineoptional
                                        Author link

                                        Title of existing Wikipedia article about the ninth author.

                                        Pageoptional
                                        Author name separator

                                        Changes the separator between last and first names; defaults to a comma and space; a space must be encoded as   do not use an asterisk, colon, or hash mark

                                        Default
                                        ,
                                        Stringoptional
                                        Author separator

                                        Changes the separator between authors; defaults to a semicolon and space; a space must be encoded as   do not use an asterisk, colon, or hash mark

                                        Default
                                        ;
                                        Stringoptional
                                        Display authors

                                        number of authors to display before 'et al.' is used; default is to do so after 8 of 9 are listed.

                                        Default
                                        8
                                        Numberoptional
                                        Last author ampersand

                                        When set to any value, changes the separator between the last two names of the author list to 'space ampersand space'

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Subscription required

                                        When set to yes, displays (subscription required) to indicate an online source that requires subscription

                                        Stringoptional
                                        Registration required

                                        When set to yes, displays (registration required) to indicate an online source that requires registration

                                        Stringoptional

                                        See also[]

                                        Template:Citation Style 1Template:Wikipedia referencingTemplate:UF-COinS

                                      • 2.02.1Template:Documentation subpageTemplate:High-riskTemplate:AWB standard installationTemplate:CsdocTemplate:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

                                        Usage[]

                                        Template:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc For references with author credit

                                        For references without author credit

                                        Template:EndTemplate:Csdoc

                                        Template:EndTemplate:Csdoc

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                                                                                                                                                     

                                        Template:Csdoc

                                                                                                                                                                     

                                        Template:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

                                        {{cite web |url = |title = |last = |first = |date = |website = |publisher = |accessdate = }}

                                        Template:End

                                        Examples[]

                                          Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                            Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                              Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                  Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                    Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                    Using format
                                                      Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                      Foreign language and translated title
                                                        Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                        Using authorlink
                                                          Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                            Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                              Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                                Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                                  Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                                    Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                                    Using "archiveurl" and "archivedate" (and optionally "deadurl") for webpages that have been archived
                                                                      Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                                        Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                                          Template loop detected: Template:Cite web
                                                                          Using quote
                                                                            Template loop detected: Template:Cite web

                                                                            Parameters[]

                                                                            Syntax[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Deprecated[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Description[]

                                                                            Authors[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Title[]

                                                                            Template:CsdocTemplate:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

                                                                            Date[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Publisher[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Series[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc Alias: agency.

                                                                            In-source locations[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            URL[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Anchor[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Identifiers[]

                                                                            Template:CsdocTemplate:Csdoc

                                                                            Quote[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Editors[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Laysummary[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Display options[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Subscription or registration required[]

                                                                            Template:Csdoc

                                                                            Template data[]

                                                                            Template:TemplateDataHeader

                                                                            Formats a citation to a website using the provided information such as URL and title. Used only for sources that are not correctly described by the specific citation templates for books, journals, news sources, etc.

                                                                            ParameterDescriptionTypeStatus
                                                                            URL

                                                                            The URL of the online location where the text of the publication can be found

                                                                            Stringrequired
                                                                            Source title

                                                                            The title of the source page on the website; will display with quotation marks added

                                                                            Stringrequired
                                                                            Source date

                                                                            Full date when the source was published; if unknown, use accessdate instead; do not wikilink

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            URL access date

                                                                            The full date when the original URL was accessed; do not wikilink

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Website title

                                                                            Title of the website; may be wikilinked; will display in italics

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Publisher

                                                                            Name of the publisher

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Last name

                                                                            The surname of the author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional authors

                                                                            Lineoptional
                                                                            First name

                                                                            Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional authors

                                                                            Lineoptional
                                                                            Author link

                                                                            Title of existing Wikipedia article about the author; can suffix with a numeral to add additional authors

                                                                            Pageoptional
                                                                            Last name

                                                                            The surname of the second author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink2'.

                                                                            Lineoptional
                                                                            First name

                                                                            Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the second author; don't wikilink.

                                                                            Lineoptional
                                                                            Author link

                                                                            Title of existing Wikipedia article about the second author.

                                                                            Pageoptional
                                                                            Others

                                                                            Used to record other (non-author) contributions to the work, such as 'Illustrated by John Smith' or 'Translated by John Smith'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Month of publication

                                                                            Name of the month of publication; do not wikilink; use 'date' instead, if day of month is also known

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Year of publication

                                                                            Year of the source being referenced; use 'date' instead, if month and day are also known

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Original year

                                                                            Original year of publication; provide specifics

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Editor last name

                                                                            The surname of the editor; don't wikilink, use 'editor-link'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional editors; alias of 'editor1-last', 'editor', and 'editors'

                                                                            Lineoptional
                                                                            Editor first name

                                                                            Given or first name, middle names, or initials of the editor; don't wikilink, use 'editor-link'; can suffix with a numeral to add additional editors; alias of 'editor1-first'

                                                                            Lineoptional
                                                                            Editor link

                                                                            Title of existing Wikipedia article about the editor; can suffix with a numeral to add additional editors

                                                                            Pageoptional
                                                                            Series identifier

                                                                            Series identifier when the source is part of a series, such as a book series or a journal

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Location of publication

                                                                            Geographical place of publication; usually not wikilinked; omit when the publication name includes place; alias of 'place'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Place of publication

                                                                            Publication place shows after title; if 'place' or 'location' are also given, they are displayed before the title prefixed with 'written at'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Publication date

                                                                            Date of publication when different from the date the work was written; do not wikilink

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Page

                                                                            Page in the source that supports the content; displays after 'p.'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Pages

                                                                            Pages in the source that support the content (not an indication of the number of pages in the source; displays after 'pp.'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            No pp

                                                                            Set to 'y' to suppress the 'p.' or 'pp.' display with 'page' or 'pages' when inappropriate (such as 'Front cover')

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            At

                                                                            May be used instead of 'page' or 'pages' where a page number is inappropriate or insufficient

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Language

                                                                            The language in which the source is written, if not English; use the full language name; do not use icons or templates

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Translated title

                                                                            An English language title, if the source cited is in a foreign language; 'language' is recommended

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Type

                                                                            Additional information about the media type of the source; format in sentence case

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Format

                                                                            Format of the work referred to by 'url'; examples: PDF, DOC, XLS; do not specify HTML

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            arXiv identifier

                                                                            An identifier for arXive electronic preprints of scientific papers

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            AZIN

                                                                            Amazon Standard Identification Number; 10 characters

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            AZIN TLD

                                                                            ASIN top-level domain for Amazon sites other than the US

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Bibcode

                                                                            Bibliographic Reference Code (REFCODE); 19 characters

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            DOI

                                                                            Digital Object Identifier; begins with '10.'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            DOI broken date

                                                                            The date that the DOI was determined to be broken

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            ISBN

                                                                            International Standard Book Number; use the 13-digit ISBN where possible

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            ISSN

                                                                            International Standard Serial Number; 8 characters; may be split into two groups of four using a hyphen

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            jfm code

                                                                            Jahrbuch über die Fortschritte der Mathematik classification code

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            JSTOR

                                                                            JSTOR identifier

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            LCCN

                                                                            Library of Congress Control Number

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            MR

                                                                            Mathematical Reviews identifier

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            OCLC

                                                                            Online Computer Library Center number

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            OL

                                                                            Open Library identifier

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            OSTI

                                                                            Office of Scientific and Technical Information identifier

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            PMC

                                                                            PubMed Center article number

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            PMID

                                                                            PubMed Unique Identifier

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            RFC

                                                                            Request for Comments number

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            SSRN

                                                                            Social Science Research Network

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Zbl

                                                                            Zentralblatt MATH journal identifier

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            id

                                                                            A unique identifier used where none of the specialized ones are applicable

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Archive URL

                                                                            The URL of an archived copy of a web page, if or in case the URL becomes unavailable; requires 'archivedate'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Archive date

                                                                            Date when the original URL was archived; do not wikilink

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Dead URL

                                                                            If set to 'no', the title display is adjusted; useful for when the URL is archived preemptively but still live

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Quote

                                                                            Relevant text quoted from the source; displays last, enclosed in quotes; needs to include terminating punctuation

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Ref

                                                                            An anchor identifier; can be made the target of wikilinks to full references; special value 'harv' generates an anchor suitable for the harv template

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Separator

                                                                            The punctuation used to separate lists of authors, editors, etc.; a space must be encoded as   do not use an asterisk, colon, or hash mark

                                                                            Default
                                                                            .
                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Postscript

                                                                            The closing punctuation for the citation; ignored if 'quote' is defined

                                                                            Default
                                                                            .
                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Lay URL

                                                                            URL link to a non-technical summary or review of the source; alias of 'laysummary'

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Lay source

                                                                            Name of the source of the laysummary; displays in italics, preceded by an en dash

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Lay date

                                                                            Date of the summary; displays in parentheses

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Author mask

                                                                            Replaces the name of the first author with em dashes or text; set to a numeric value 'n' to set the dash 'n' em spaces wide; set to a text value to display the text without a trailing author separator; for example, 'with' instead

                                                                            Stringoptional
                                                                            Last name

                                                                            The surname of the third author; don't wikilink, use 'authorlink3'.

                                                                            Lineoptional
                                                                          • Sours: https://tedmovie.fandom.com/wiki/Ted_(film)
                                                                            Tedisreal.png
                                                                            Ted
                                                                            Background information
                                                                            First appearance:Ted
                                                                            Latest appearance:Ted 2
                                                                            Portrayer:Seth MacFarlane
                                                                            Zane Cowans (as a child)
                                                                            Tara Strong ("I love you" function)
                                                                            Character information
                                                                            Full name:Theodore Clubberlang
                                                                            Other names:Teddy (formerly), Ted Clubberlang
                                                                            Personality:Happy, friendly, sweet-matured, cheerful (all formerly as a child), lovable, bighearted, irresponsible, inappropriate, caring, well-meaning, short-tempered, sarcastic, slightly vain, somewhat childish, intelligent, paranoid (around thunder)
                                                                            Appearance:Light brown teddy bear with a blue bow tie (as a child)
                                                                            Birthday:1977
                                                                            Age:35 (first film) 38 (second film)
                                                                            Occupation:Grocery cashier
                                                                            Home:Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
                                                                            Family and relatives:John Bennett (best friend and brother figure), Lori Collins (ex-sister-in-law), Steve Bennett (adoptive father), Helen Bennett (adoptive mother), Tami-Lynn McCafferty (wife), Apollo Creed Clubber Lang (son)
                                                                            Friends:John Bennett, Lori Collins, Tami-Lynn McCafferty, Apollo Creed Clubber Lang, Sam J. Jones, Norah Jones, Guy, Tracy, Frank Stevens, Jarred, Samantha Jackson, Patrick Meighan, Donny (formerly), Robert (formerly)
                                                                            Enemies:Donny, Robert, Rex, Shep Wild (formerly)
                                                                            Likes:Drugs, beer, profanity, smoking, Flash Gordon, Star Wars, Rocky, Samantha, hanging out with John
                                                                            Dislikes:Getting kidnapped, dying, being called property, being fired, thunder
                                                                            Quotes:"You're my best friend!" (as a child)
                                                                            "I love you!" ("I love you" function)
                                                                            "Fuck you, thunder!"
                                                                            "John, I look like somethin' you give to your kid when you tell 'em Grandma died."


                                                                            BAllsTheodore "Ted" Clubberlang (1985-2012; resurrected 2012), formerly known as Teddy, is the titular deuteragonist of the franchise of the same name. He is the deuteragonist of Ted and the protagonist of Ted 2, he is John's best friend and brother figure, Lori's brother-in-law, Tami-Lynn's husband, Apollo Creed Clubber Lang's father, and Steve and Helen's youngest adoptive son.

                                                                            Biography[]

                                                                            Beginnings[]

                                                                            Ted is first given to John as a Christmas present and is named Teddy by the delighted boy. That night, John tells the inanimate Teddy he wishes he could really talk so they can be best friends "forever and ever" before going to sleep.

                                                                            The next morning, John wakes up and realizes that Teddy is not in bed with him. He gets out of his bed and searches everywhere in his room for Teddy. Soon, John discovers the young bear on the ground, alive and talking on his own. He tells John to hug him since he is his best friend. Startled, John terrifyingly asks Teddy if he just talked, to which he tells John not to look so surprised as he had wished for it. Now overjoyed since this means they can be friends forever, John hugs Teddy and then runs into the kitchen to tell his parents the good news. However, they do not believe him and instead humor him, with his mother Helen saying in a fake amazed tone, "Really? Well, isn't that exciting?". John insists that Teddy is really alive and proves it by introducing Teddy in front of his parents and the living bear wishes the parents a merry Christmas. Suddenly, John's parents get scared and John's father Steve tells John to come over to him, but John doesn't want to. Steve shouts at his son to come and he reluctantly does so, followed by his mother yelling at him to listen to his father. Then he tells his wife to get his gun, to which John is scared, telling his father not to, and Teddy innocently asks if it is a "hugging gun". After Steve tells Helen to get his gun and call the police, Teddy apologizes for scaring them as he never meant to and explains that he just wanted him and John to be best friends. After John and Teddy manage to convince them, Steve and Helen warm up to Teddy as their second son and an amazed Helen tells Teddy he is a Christmas miracle and is just like the "baby Jesus."

                                                                            The news about Teddy coming to life rapidly spreads worldwide. This, in turn, makes Teddy a famous celebrity and child star. He even gets a guest-starring role on The Johnny Carson Show. After being welcomed and shaking his hand politely, Carson tells Teddy that he was expecting him to be taller, to which Teddy tells the host that he thought he was going to be funnier. This makes Carson and the audience laugh hysterically at Teddy's comeback joke.

                                                                            One rainy night, John and Teddy are in their tent inside, promising to be "thunder buddies" for life. Then John asks Teddy if he promises they will be friends forever and the young bear assures John he promises and will never back out.

                                                                            In Ted[]

                                                                            27 years later in 2012, John and Ted are living at an apartment in Boston, smoking marijuana while watching television in the morning. Soon, John realizes he is late for work and Ted drives him to the car rental service where he works. Lori, John's girlfriend for 4 years, is still annoyed at the fact that John spends more time with Ted than with her. Ted invites a couple of hookers into their apartment for a party when John and Lori arrives home from a date.

                                                                            Unable to have Ted at their apartment, Ted finds a job as a grocery store clerk so he can afford a new apartment for himself. At a park, John and Ted meet a man named Donny and his son Robert, who unknowingly to them has been stalking Ted for years. Donny tries to buy Ted for his son, who is interested with owning Ted.

                                                                            During work, Ted flirts with another new clerk named Tami-Lynn. His irresponsible and inappropriate behavior with her promoted him. During a double-date with John and Lori, Tami-Lynn angers at Lori during a talk she misunderstood, leaving Lori shocked at her anger. John starts leaving work early to spend more bonding time with Ted, which upsets Lori.

                                                                            One night, Ted calls John, who is at a party hosted by Lori's boss Rex, and tells him that Sam J. Jones, the actor who played their favorite superhero Flash Gordon, is one of the guests at his party in his apartment. At the party, John and Ted befriends their idol, Sam J. Jones. Upon John and Lori's break up due to his long abandonment at Rex's party, John angrily blames Ted for the mishap and tells him to no longer interact with him. A few days later, Ted visits John at the motel he is staying at. Still angry at him for what has happened, John says he wishes he had a Teddy Ruxpin for Christmas instead of Ted, angering him. They ended up fighting with each other, then later became best friends again after the fight. They decided to enter the Norah Jones concert at the Hatch Memorial Shell, which Lori and Rex are attending. In the backstage, it is revealed that Norah Jones and Ted are personal friends. Being friends with Norah Jones, she allowed John to sing "All Time High," the theme song of Octopussy, dedicated to Lori, but received negative feedback from the audience for his off-key tone and was booed off stage.

                                                                            The next day, Ted visits Lori at her apartment where he encourages her to reconcile with John and tells her that it was all his fault that he caused the mishap and that he would leave their privacy alone. Seconds later after Lori leaves the apartment, Ted opens the door and sees [[Donny]] and [[Robert]], who kidnaps him.

                                                                            At their house, Ted realizes that Donny and Robert have been stalking him ever since his fame after he saw numerous pictures of him at their wall. At Robert's bedroom, Donny explains to Ted that every time he saw Ted on television, he always dreamed for a teddy bear who had a life like him. Donny also tells Ted that every time he asks for a teddy bear, his father would disregard, and that he promised himself he would never say no to his son. Robert and Ted then plays a game of hide and seek, where Ted hides and uses his hiding time to call John. However, Donny spots Ted and cuts the telephone wire to end the call. John, who was with a conversation with Lori at her car, was able to receive a call before Donny's discovery and gets the paper that Donny gave to him at the park at an earlier scene. Upon Donny's discovery, Donny and Robert flee away with Ted. During their escape, John and Lori follows them in a car chase. Donny and Robert's car crashes into a fire hydrant, but continues the escape to Fenway Park. Donny and Ted's outrun leads to the Green Monster, where Ted tries to climb one of the light towers. During Ted's climb, Donny grabs Ted's foot and falls into the field torn in half. Ted, who is dying, tells John to never lose Lori again since she is the most important part of his life, even more than Ted. Upon Ted telling John, he eventually loses his magical life and dies.

                                                                            John and Lori rush back to their apartment to sew him back together as John cannot accept his best friend's death. Lori tells him that their plan will not work. They instead cover his ripped body with cloth. Later that night, Lori sees a shooting star and makes a wish. The following day, John takes one more look at the deceased Ted. A few seconds later, Ted's eyes start to blink with his magical life restored. As Ted finds out that Lori wished for his life back, she says that she actually wished for her life back. John then proposes to Lori as Ted watches them kiss. At John and Lori's wedding at a church in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Ted becomes the best man at their wedding, while Sam J. Jones, who reveals to be an ordained minister, presides the wedding. Ted and Sam J. Jones then end the day with a flash jump.

                                                                            At the end of the film, the narrator reveals that Ted and Tami-Lynn are still dating and that he was promoted to store manager at the grocery store he is working at, despite his irresponsible behavior.

                                                                            In Ted 2[]

                                                                            Ted returned in the sequel as the main protagonist.

                                                                            Other appearances[]

                                                                            85th Academy Awards[]

                                                                            At the 85th Academy Awards on February 24, 2013 (which was hosted by Seth MacFarlane), Mark Wahlberg (John Bennett) and Ted presented the Academy Award for Best Sound Editing. During their presentation, Ted mentioned Alan Arkin, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Joaquin Phoenix as "hot Jewish". Ted asks Wahlberg if he is Jewish. Wahlberg responded that he is a Catholic. Ted later states that he is Jewish, but Wahlberg denies. Ted claims he was born "Theodore Shapiro", would like to donate money to Israel, and will continue to work in Hollywood forever. Wahlberg tells Ted that he is an idiot and that he won't do the sequel with him.

                                                                            Personality[]

                                                                            This article is a stub. You can help Ted Movie Wiki by expanding it.

                                                                            As a child, Ted was a happy, friendly, selfless, giving, sweet-natured bear who claimed that John was his best friend forever and then he grew fame, guest-starring on The Johnny Carson Show. No matter how famous he became, Teddy never forgot about his friendship with John and has always been at his side.

                                                                            However, as he grew up, Ted became an irresponsible, toxic waste as he was caught with mushrooms and him being sent to jail, and after that, he has been drinking beer and smoking marijuana with John on the couch watching their favorite movie Flash Gordon. Despite this, he is still a very big-hearted and lovable bear, who always loves and cares for his friends.

                                                                            Trivia[]

                                                                            • Ted is often thought to be the titular protagonist of the first film.
                                                                            • There have been rumors that said Danny Anderson and Zachary Gordon were the voices of young Ted, despite Zane Cowans voicing him.

                                                                            Gallery[]

                                                                            Ted Seth macFarlane
                                                                            Ted Movie Young Ted

                                                                            Ted as a child

                                                                            Ted the bear
                                                                            Uncle Ted

                                                                            Ted dressed as Uncle Sam

                                                                            Sours: https://tedmovie.fandom.com/wiki/Ted_(character)

                                                                            Wiki ted

                                                                            Ted (film)

                                                                            2012 American fantasy comedy film by Seth MacFarlane

                                                                            Ted is a 2012 American fantasycomedy film directed by Seth MacFarlane in his directorial debut and written by MacFarlane, Alec Sulkin, and Wellesley Wild. The film stars Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis, with Joel McHale and Giovanni Ribisi in supporting roles, and MacFarlane providing the voice and motion capture of the title character. The film tells the story of John Bennett, a Boston native whose childhood wish brings his teddy bear friend Ted to life. However, in adulthood, Ted prevents John and his girlfriend Lori Collins from moving on with their lives.

                                                                            The film is MacFarlane's feature-length directorial debut,[3] produced by Media Rights Capital and distributed by Universal Pictures. Ted was released in theaters in the United States on June 29, 2012, and was a box office hit, grossing $549.4 million against a $50-65 million budget. It was the 12th highest-grossing film of 2012 and received an Oscar nomination for Best Original Song. Ted received mixed to positive reviews with critics praising the humor and premise while criticizing the plot and inconsistent script. A sequel, Ted 2, was released in 2015.

                                                                            Plot[edit]

                                                                            In 1985, eight-year-old John Bennett is a friendless only child living in Norwood, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, who wishes for his new Christmas gift, a jumbo teddy bear named Ted, to come to life and become his best friend. The wish coincides with a shooting star and comes true; word spreads and Ted briefly becomes a celebrity. Unfortunately that caused John’s parents to freak out.

                                                                            27 years later, John (now 35) and Ted are still living in Boston, and are still staunch companions enjoying a hedonistic life. John is dating Lori Collins whom he met at a dance club. As their fourth anniversary approaches, Lori hopes to marry John, but feels he can not move forward in life with Ted around. John is hesitant about making Ted leave, but he is persuaded to act when they find Ted at home with a group of prostitutes after their anniversary dinner.

                                                                            John finds Ted his own apartment and a job at a grocery store, where Ted begins dating his co-worker Tami-Lynn. Lori learns that John has been skipping work, using her as an excuse, to reluctantly continue to spend most of his time with Ted. John and Lori are invited to a party put on by Lori's womanizing manager Rex, but Ted lures John away to a party at his apartment with the pressured offer to meet Sam J. Jones, the star of their favorite film, Flash Gordon. John intends to stay only a few minutes, but gets caught up in the occasion. Lori finds John there and furiously breaks up with him. A devastated John angrily blames Ted for ruining his relationship with Lori and disowns him.

                                                                            John and Ted confront each other about their ruined friendship and then fight, but manage to reconcile after a violent brawl in John's hotel room (John is crushed by a television). To repair John's relationship with Lori, Ted arranges for an old lover, singer Norah Jones, to help by having John express his love for Lori with a song during her concert that Lori and Rex attend. He does an off-key rendition of the Octopussy theme song, All Time High, by Rita Coolidge and is booed offstage. Lori is touched by the attempt and returns to her apartment, where Ted confesses to his role in John's relapse and offers to leave them alone forever if she talks to John.

                                                                            Lori is persuaded, but Ted is kidnapped by Donny, a mentally unstablestalker who idolized Ted as a child. Donny plans to make Ted into his brutish son Robert's new toy. Ted manages to reach a phone to contact John, but is immediately recaptured by Donny and Robert. Realizing that Ted is in danger, John and Lori locate Donny's residence and track him to rescue Ted. The chase leads to Fenway Park, where John punches Robert, knocking him out, but during the chase, Ted is damaged and falls onto the field, ripped entirely in half. A police car arrives, forcing Donny to flee. John and Lori gather Ted's stuffing and Ted relays his wish that John be happy with Lori, before the magic in Ted fades away making him a normal teddy bear again.

                                                                            Unwilling to lose Ted, a distraught John and Lori rush back to her apartment and attempt to repair Ted, which proves useless. Later, Ted is covered with a blanket. Lori brings two hot drinks for her and John, and apologizes for Ted's death. Immediately afterward, a thunderclap happens, but John is too upset to feel scared. Feeling sad about her part in the incident, Lori makes a wish on a shooting star while John is asleep. The next morning, Ted is revived as a result of the wish and reunites with John and Lori, encouraging them to resume their relationship. John then finally proposes to Lori and she accepts. Sometime later, John and Lori are married (with Sam Jones as the presiding minister), and Ted comfortably accepts having a life of his own, as he and Tami-Lynn continued their love affair. Sam Jones attempts to restart his career and moves into a studio apartment with Brandon Routh (who starred in the "god-awful Superman movie"). Rex gives up his pursuit of Lori, falls into a deep depression, and dies of Lou Gehrig's disease. Donny gets arrested by the Boston Police Department for kidnapping Ted, but the charges are dropped because the situation was not realistic. Robert hires a personal trainer, loses a significant amount of weight, and goes on to become Taylor Lautner.

                                                                            Cast[edit]

                                                                            • Mark Wahlberg as John Bennett, Ted's best friend who as a child wished he would come to life. An immature but mild-mannered slacker in his 30s who loves to smoke pot with his best friend.
                                                                              • Colton Shires as teenage John Bennett
                                                                              • Bretton Manley as young John Bennett
                                                                            • Seth MacFarlane as Ted (voice and motion capture), John's teddy bear and best friend. John wished him to life when he was a kid and the two have remained friends ever since. Ted grows up to be a crude, foul-mouthed, alcoholic teddy bear, but he is also a lovable cheeky-chappy and is highly protective of John.
                                                                            • Mila Kunis as Lori Collins, John's girlfriend
                                                                            • Joel McHale as Rex, Lori's manager and John's nemesis
                                                                            • Giovanni Ribisi as Donny, Ted's biggest fan and stalker
                                                                            • Aedin Mincks as Robert, Donny's son
                                                                            • Patrick Warburton as Guy, John's co-worker
                                                                            • Laura Vandervoort as Tanya, John's co-worker
                                                                            • Matt Walsh as Thomas Murphy, John's boss
                                                                            • Jessica Barth as Tami-Lynn McCafferty, Ted's girlfriend and co-worker
                                                                            • Bill Smitrovich as Frank Stevens, Ted's boss
                                                                            • Alex Borstein as Helen Bennett, John's mother
                                                                            • Ralph Garman as Steve Bennett, John's father
                                                                            • Jessica Stroup as Tracy, Lori's co-worker
                                                                            • Sam J. Jones as himself
                                                                            • Ryan Reynolds (uncredited) as Jared, Guy's boyfriend
                                                                            • Norah Jones as herself
                                                                            • Tom Skerritt as himself
                                                                            • Mike Henry as a Southern newscaster
                                                                            • Robert Wu as Quan Ming/Ming the Merciless
                                                                            • Ted Danson (uncredited) as himself
                                                                            • Patrick Stewart as Narrator [4]

                                                                            Production[edit]

                                                                            Seth MacFarlanewrote, produced, and directed the film, and provided the motion capture and the voice for the title character.

                                                                            Seth MacFarlane's directorial debut is a live-action effort, with computer animation handled by visual effects facilities Tippett Studio and Iloura. MacFarlane wrote the screenplay with his Family Guy colleagues Alec Sulkin and Wellesley Wild.[5] In a "behind the scenes" video, it was revealed that MacFarlane originally wanted to make Ted into an animated television show, much like his previous works Family Guy, American Dad!, and The Cleveland Show.

                                                                            Originally, 20th Century Fox was offered to finance and distribute the movie, given its collaboration with MacFarlane for shows like Family Guy, American Dad!, and The Cleveland Show. However, MacFarlane wanted a $65 million budget for the movie, which Fox considered the price to be too high for the R-rated comedy film, let alone for a first-time director, and was skeptical about the film's future success. Subsequently, Fox backed out and MacFarlane began to take the project elsewhere.[6] On April 12, 2010, Universal Pictures announced that it had acquired the full rights to Ted after it agreed to the $65 million budget he requested.[2]

                                                                            On October 26, 2010, Mark Wahlberg joined in the project as the lead actor.[5] Two months later on December 14, Mila Kunis, the voice actress for Meg Griffin from Family Guy, also joined the cast.[7] On February 23, 2011, Giovanni Ribisi joined Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis in Ted.[8] Filming began in May 2011 in Boston, Norwood and other locations in Massachusetts.[9] Based on the standings on the left-field scoreboard, the climactic scene in Fenway Park appears to have been filmed on or around May 24, 2011.[original research?]

                                                                            The film was scheduled for release in the United States on July 13, 2012, but it was moved up to June 29, both to avoid competition with Ice Age: Continental Drift and following the delay of G.I. Joe: Retaliation.[10] Internationally, the film was released in Australia on July 5, 2012,[11] and on August 1, 2012 in the United Kingdom and Ireland.[12]

                                                                            Soundtrack[edit]

                                                                            The film's soundtrack was released by Universal Republic Records on June 26, 2012. It features the score by Walter Murphy and songs by various artists such as Norah Jones and Queen. Seth MacFarlane co-wrote the opening theme "Everybody Needs a Best Friend" with Murphy.[13] The song was later nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 85th Academy Awards.[14]

                                                                            Track listing

                                                                            All tracks by Walter Murphy except where indicated.

                                                                            Other songs which do not appear on the soundtrack but are featured in the film include songs from Queen's Flash Gordon soundtrack: "Football Fight", "Battle Theme", and "The Hero", as well as the "Knight Rider Theme" by Stu Phillips, "Stayin' Alive" by "Bee Gees", "Kiss Kiss" by "Chris Brown" and "The Imperial March" by John Williams. The film trailers used the songs "Best Friend" by Harry Nilsson and "How You Like Me Now?" by The Heavy.

                                                                            Marketing[edit]

                                                                            To promote the film, Universal Pictures teamed up with Axe in a marketing campaign that involved the title character and the brand's hair care product Axe Hair.[15] In one commercial, Ted takes a woman on a date to a fancy restaurant, where he brings her to orgasm under the table before handing another man a box of Axe Hair gel.[16]

                                                                            To promote the film in Japan, United International Pictures teamed up with Spike Chunsoft in a marketing campaign that involved the title character and DanganronpabearmascotMonokuma, in which while watching the film, Monkuma says: "Wow, Ted is so sexy and hot... I wonder if he thinks I'M hot!?!?!? This movie is really fucking funny, thanks Seth McFartline. I can't wait to show this movie to my good friend SuperMario when I get into Super Smash Bros.Ted, Rated R15+. Available now!"[17]

                                                                            In February 2013, Wahlberg and MacFarlane (as Ted) made an appearance at the 85th Academy Awards, which MacFarlane himself hosted.[18]

                                                                            Release[edit]

                                                                            Box office[edit]

                                                                            Ted grossed $218.8 million in North America and $330.6 million overseas for a total gross of $549.4 million, against a budget of $50 million.[1] It was Universal's highest-grossing film in 2012, ahead of Snow White and the Huntsman and Battleship[19] (the only one to pass $400 million[20]), and the 12th-highest-grossing film of 2012.

                                                                            Asia

                                                                            Ted debuted in first place in Taiwan and got the best comedy opening ever there.[21] It also debuted in Hong Kong, with $1.4 million, and grossed $571,000 in its first week in South Korea,[22] eventually grossing $8 million, $3.8 million and $1.8 million respectively.[23] It also grossed $2.1 million in both Indonesia and Singapore, and $1.4 million in Thailand.[23]

                                                                            In January 2013, the film opened at number one in Japan, its final market, with $4.5 million, the best start ever for an R-rated comedy there. In comparison, it grossed more in its opening weekend than The Hangover Part II made in its entire run.[24] The following weekend, it retained the No. 1 spot for the second consecutive frame, grossing $3.6 million at 137 dates, for a 10-day market cumulative total of $11.2 million.[25] By its third weekend, the film stayed at the No. 1 spot for a third week, with earning down less than 10%, pushing Ted's overseas total past the $300 million mark, and making it the top grossing R-rated comedy of all time in Japan.[26] It then had its fourth consecutive weekend at No. 1, drawing another $3 million at 354 locations in the country.[27] Its cumulative total stands at $44 million grossed.[28]

                                                                            Europe

                                                                            Ted debuted with $14.3 million in the United Kingdom, making it the third-best debut ever for a Universal film behind Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason and King Kong,[29] eventually grossing over $48.9 million in the country. Ted was released in cinemas across the United Kingdom on August 3.[23]

                                                                            The film had a $7.4 million launch in Germany,[29] holding #1 spot for three-straight weeks,[30] eventually grossing over $31.4 million.[23]

                                                                            In Spain, it opened with $2.3 million, which is the highest ever for an original R-rated comedy there,[31] eventually grossing over $14.3 million.[23]

                                                                            The film also had the best Hollywood comedy debut ever in Russia, grossing $5.5 million,[29] eventually grossing $17 million.[23]

                                                                            Ted spent its first 4 weeks atop the weekend box office in both the Netherlands,[32] and Austria,[33] eventually grossing $8.4 million, and $6.2 million in those countries respectively.[23] The movie also opened at No. 1 in Belgium, with $587,000, eventually grossing $4.4 million.[23]

                                                                            In Italy, the film had a second place start, grossing $3.3 million in its opening weekend there,[34] moving up to no. 1 on its second week, with $4.2 million grossed.[35] It has since grossed $14.1 million there.[23]

                                                                            In France, the film debuted at No. 2, grossing $3 million in 348 theatres during its opening weekend,[36] eventually grossing $11.5 million in the country.[23]

                                                                            North America

                                                                            Ted earned $2.6 million in midnight showings in the United States and Canada.[37] For its opening day, Ted scored one of the best R-rated comedy debuts ever since The Hangover with an estimated $20.2 million.[1][38] The film earned a total of $54.4 million in its opening weekend, well over second-place R-rated Magic Mike's $39.2 million.[39] Its overall weekend gross set a record for the highest original R-rated comedy opening in history.[40] It was the first time two R-rated films grossed more than $21 million each during a weekend.[41]

                                                                            In Mexico, the film debuted in first place with $2.1 million,[20] grossing $13.4 million.[23]

                                                                            Oceania

                                                                            Ted also debuted at #1 in Australia and New Zealand, grossing over $35.5 million and $3.5 million respectively.[23] Its $13.1 million opening in Australia, of which $4.5 million were from previews, was Universal's biggest opening ever in the country.[21] In Australia, Ted was rated MA 15+,[42] whereas in New Zealand, it was rated R13 for its theatrical release and R16 for the DVD/Blu-ray release.

                                                                            South America

                                                                            In Brazil, the film opened with $1.4 million at 273 sites,[43] moving up to 1st place in the country on its third week of release.[44] It has since grossed $8.8 million there.[23]

                                                                            The film also grossed $4.6 million in Argentina, 2 million in Chile, 1.9 million in Peru, and 1.7 million in Colombia.[23]

                                                                            Critical reception[edit]

                                                                            On Rotten Tomatoes the film has an approval rating of 69% based on 221 reviews with an average rating of 6.40/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Ted's "romance versus bromance" plot is familiar, but the film's held aloft by the high-concept central premise and a very funny (albeit inconsistent) script."[45] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 62 out of 100 based on 37 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[46] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "A-" on an A+ to F scale.[47]

                                                                            Roger Ebert gave the film three-and-a-half stars out of four, citing the film as "the best comedy screenplay so far [this year]," also praising the film on the fact that it "doesn't run out of steam."[48]

                                                                            Nathan Rabin of The A.V. Club gave the film a "B" grade.[49] Brent McNight of Beyond Hollywood commented on the jokes: "Some of these jokes hit, some jokes miss."[50] On the other hand, A. O. Scott of The New York Times called Ted "boring, lazy and wildly unoriginal."[51]

                                                                            Accolades[edit]

                                                                            Home media[edit]

                                                                            The film was released on DVD and Blu-ray in the United States on December 11, 2012 by Universal Studios Home Entertainment. Both formats featured an unrated version of the film (112 minutes) and were also released in Australia on November 21, 2012, in an "Extended Edition".[67] It was released on DVD and Blu-ray in the United Kingdom on November 26, 2012.

                                                                            On May 3, 2016, Ted vs. Flash Gordon: The Ultimate Collection was released on Blu-ray plus Digital HD, featuring Flash Gordon and the unrated versions of Ted and Ted 2.[68]

                                                                            Sequel[edit]

                                                                            Main article: Ted 2

                                                                            During the 2012 American Dad!Comic-Con panel, MacFarlane stated that he would be open to a sequel to Ted.[69] In September 2012, chief executive Steve Burke said that the studio would be looking to make a sequel to Ted "as soon as possible".[70]

                                                                            On Anderson Live, Wahlberg confirmed that a sequel was in the works and that it would be the first sequel in his career, while also revealing that he and Ted (as voiced by MacFarlane) would appear at the 85th Academy Awards.[71]

                                                                            In February 2014, Deadline reported that Amanda Seyfried had been cast as the female lead, and that Kunis would not return.[72] On July 8, MacFarlane announced that work had officially begun on the sequel.[73]Ted 2 was released in the US on June 26, 2015.[74]

                                                                            Television series[edit]

                                                                            In June 2021, it was announced that a live-action prequel television series based on the film had been ordered at Peacock. MacFarlane is in negotiations to reprise the voice of Ted. The project will be co-production between Universal Content Productions and MRC Television and MacFarlane and Erica Huggins to be executive produce.[75]

                                                                            References[edit]

                                                                            1. ^ abcd"Ted (2012)". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved April 11, 2013.
                                                                            2. ^ abMike Fleming Jr (April 14, 2010). "Universal Buys Seth MacFarlane's R-Rated Comedy About Teddy Bear In MRC Film Deal". Deadline Hollywood.
                                                                            3. ^Fleming, Mike (October 25, 2010). "Mark Wahlberg back in Buddy Comedy Mode". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 30, 2012.
                                                                            4. ^ abc"Ted". Behind The Voice Actors. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
                                                                            5. ^ abWigler, Josh (October 26, 2010). "Mark Wahlberg Joins Family Guy Creator Seth MacFarlane for Ted". MTV.com. Retrieved March 16, 2011.
                                                                            6. ^Masters, Kim (July 11, 2012). "How Fox Missed Out on Box Office Hit 'Ted'". The Hollywood Reporter.
                                                                            7. ^"Mila Kunis To Join Mark Wahlberg In Seth MacFarlane's Movie 'Ted'?". Huffington Post. December 14, 2010.
                                                                            8. ^Goldberg, Matt (February 23, 2011). "Giovanni Ribisi Joins Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis in Seth MacFarlane's TED". Collider.
                                                                            9. ^"New Projects coming to New England". OnLocationsVacations.com. January 17, 2011. Retrieved March 16, 2011.
                                                                            10. ^"Seth MacFarlane's Ted now scheduled for theatrical release June 29th". DailyBlam.com. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            11. ^"Ted"Archived May 13, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Village Cinemas. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            12. ^"Ted". FilmDates.co.uk. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            13. ^"Ted Movie Soundtrack". Soundtrack-Movie.com. Retrieved November 13, 2012.
                                                                            14. ^Morgan, David (January 10, 2013). ""Lincoln," "Life of Pi" lead Oscar race". CBS News. CBS Corporation. Retrieved October 7, 2013.
                                                                            15. ^"AXE Hair Teams Up with Universal Pictures' New Comedy Ted to Show How Great Hair Can Help Guys Get Away with Anything". PR Newswire. June 22, 2012. Retrieved November 9, 2012.
                                                                            16. ^Nudd, Tim (July 10, 2012). "Ted Gets Dirty with Axe Hair Products in Seth MacFarlane Ads (NSFW)". AdWeek. Retrieved November 9, 2012.
                                                                            17. ^"Danganronpa, Ted Bear Characters Team Up for Promo Campaign". Anime News Network. August 26, 2013. Retrieved August 26, 2013.
                                                                            18. ^"Ted to come to life on Oscars night". 3 News NZ. January 9, 2013.
                                                                            19. ^"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Taken 2' Crushes Predecessor, 'Ted' Sets New Record". Boxofficemojo.com. October 16, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            20. ^ ab"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Resident Evil' Slays With $49.6 Million Debut". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            21. ^ ab"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Spidey' Adds $127.5 Million Overseas". Boxofficemojo.com. July 10, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            22. ^"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Looper' Likely Leads Overseas". Boxofficemojo.com. October 2, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            23. ^ abcdefghijklmn"Ted (2012) – Foreign Total Gross". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            24. ^"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Django' Beats 'Basterds' in Overseas Debut". Boxofficemojo.com. January 22, 2013. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            25. ^"Foreign Box Office: 'Django Unchained' Retains No. 1 Spot, Flying Past 100-Million Mark". hollywoodreporter.com. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
                                                                            26. ^"Box Office Milestone: 'Ted' Crosses $300 Million Overseas, Fueled by Japan". hollywoodreporter.com. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
                                                                            27. ^"Foreign Box Office: 'Django Unchained' Remains No. 1, But 'Die Hard' Steals Weekend". hollywoodreporter.com. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
                                                                            28. ^"Ted - Japan weekend box office". Boxofficemojo.com. June 29, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            29. ^ abcSubers, Ray (August 5, 2012). "Around-the-World Roundup: 'Dark Knight' Leads, 'Ted' Impresses in New Markets". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            30. ^"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Dark Knight Rises' Passes 'Dark Knight' Overseas". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            31. ^"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Dark Knight' Rules Again", Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            32. ^"Ted - Netherlands Weekend Box Office". Boxofficemojo.com. June 29, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            33. ^"Ted – Austria Weekend Box Office". Boxofficemojo.com. June 29, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            34. ^"Around-the-World Roundup: 'Taken 2' Off to Great Start Overseas". Boxofficemojo.com. October 9, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            35. ^Movies. "'Ted' Talks Way to Box-Office Record for Original R-Rated Comedy". Thewrap.com. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            36. ^"France Box Office – October 10–14, 2012". Boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            37. ^"'Magic Mike' earns $2.1 million at midnight shows; 'Ted' even bigger with $2.6 million". Inside Movies. EW.com. Retrieved June 30, 2012.
                                                                            38. ^"Box office update: 'Ted' smokes competition with $20.2 million Friday; 'Magic Mike' close behind". Inside Movies. EW.com. Retrieved June 30, 2012.
                                                                            39. ^Sinha-Roy, Piya; Richwine, Lisa (July 1, 2012). "Foul-mouthed 'Ted' takes movie box office crown". Reuters. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
                                                                            40. ^"Box Office Report: 'Ted' Earns Record $54.1 Mil; 'Magic Mike' Sizzles With $39.2 Mil". Yahoo.com. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            41. ^Kaufman, Amy (July 2, 2012). "'Ted,' 'Magic Mike' have a record weekend for R-rated movies". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 26, 2012.
                                                                            42. ^"Ted". Village Cinemas. Archived from the original on May 13, 2013. Retrieved May 19, 2013.
                                                                            43. ^"Foreign Box Office: 'Resident Evil: Retribution' Repeats as No. 1 Overseas in Sluggish Session". The Hollywood Reporter. September 23, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            44. ^"Brazil Box Office, September 28–30, 2012". Boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            45. ^"Ted (2012)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved April 29, 2021.
                                                                            46. ^"Ted". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved July 31, 2012.
                                                                            47. ^"CinemaScore". cinemascore.com.
                                                                            48. ^"Ted Review". Chicago Sun-Times. RogerEbert.com. Retrieved September 21, 2021.
                                                                            49. ^Rabin, Nathan (June 28, 2012). "Ted". AVClub.com. Retrieved June 29, 2012.
                                                                            50. ^McNight, Brent (June 29, 2012). "Ted (2012) Movie Review". Beyond Hollywood. Retrieved June 30, 2012.
                                                                            51. ^Scott, A. O. (June 28, 2012). "The Lady or the Teddy?". NYTimes.com. Retrieved June 28, 2012.
                                                                            52. ^Macatee, Rebecca (June 14, 2012). "Teen Choice Awards 2012: Breaking Dawn, Snow White Lead Second Wave of Nominations". E! Online. Retrieved September 19, 2012.
                                                                            53. ^"IFMCA: the International Film Music Critics Association » IFMCA Winners 2012". Filmmusiccritics.org. Retrieved February 21, 2013.
                                                                            54. ^"Phoenix Award 2012 nominations". Archived from the original on May 19, 2014. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
                                                                            55. ^"Seth MacFarlane // TED // Bester Film International // JUPITER AWARD 2013". Cinema Magazine. October 29, 2013. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
                                                                            56. ^"St. Louis Critics Announce 2012 Award Nominees". indieWire. December 11, 2012. Retrieved December 12, 2012.
                                                                            57. ^"People Choice Awards 2013 Nominees". peopleschoice.com. Retrieved January 3, 2013.
                                                                            58. ^"2018 Critics Choice Awards, Nominees, Winners, TV Schedule, Pictures". www.chiff.com. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
                                                                            59. ^Gallagher, Brian (January 16, 2012). "62nd Annual ACE Eddie Awards Nominations". movieweb.com. MovieWeb. Retrieved January 7, 2015.
                                                                            60. ^"Members". www.georgiafilmcritics.org. Retrieved March 27, 2018.
                                                                            61. ^"2013 Oscar Nominees | 85th Academy Awards Nominees". Oscar.go.com. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            62. ^"Best Comedy". Empireonline.com. Bauer Consumer Media. 2013. Retrieved August 18, 2014.
                                                                            63. ^"2013 MTV Movie Awards Nominations: Full List". abc.com. Retrieved March 7, 2013.
                                                                            64. ^Truitt, Brian (June 27, 2013). 'Avengers,' 'Breaking Bad' top Saturn Award winners, USA Today. Retrieved June 26, 2013.
                                                                            65. ^"ASCAP : We Create Music : Events and Awards". Ascap.com. Retrieved May 9, 2014.
                                                                            66. ^"Spike TV's Guys Choice Awards to Honor Ben Affleck, Jimmy Kimmel". May 2, 2013. Retrieved May 3, 2013.
                                                                            67. ^"Boy and Bear". STACK Magazine. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved November 14, 2012.
                                                                            68. ^"Ted vs. Flash Gordon: The Ultimate Collection". Blu-ray.com. Retrieved August 17, 2016.
                                                                            69. ^"Seth MacFarlane Says "I'd Be Open To Making Ted 2": Comic-Con". Deadline.com, Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            70. ^"Steve Burke says studio will make 'Ted' sequel "as soon as possible"". BBC News. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
                                                                            71. ^Franich, Darren (January 17, 2013). "Mark Wahlberg and Ted to appear at Oscars - VIDEO". Insidemovies.ew.com. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
                                                                            72. ^"Amanda Seyfried Set By Seth MacFarlane For 'Ted' Sequel". Deadline Hollywood. February 24, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2014.
                                                                            73. ^MacFarlane, Seth [@SethMacFarlane] (July 9, 2014). "Ted 2 begins" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
                                                                            74. ^"'Ted 2' Gets June 2015 Release Date". Deadline Hollywood. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
                                                                            75. ^Andreeva, Nellie (June 10, 2021). "'Ted' TV Series From Seth MacFarlane Based On Movie Ordered By Peacock; UCP & MRC Producing". Deadline Hollywood.

                                                                            External links[edit]

                                                                            Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_(film)

                                                                            Torpedo Ted

                                                                            Torpedo Teds are personified torpedoes that are dropped by Torpedo Bases underwater. Their designs are similar to that of Bullet Bills: they similar have white arms and the same jet-black coloration, though their appearance is distinguished by a smug grin and a propeller on their thruster. They first appear in Super Mario World and have made uncommon appearances since then. Due to Mario's inability to stomp on enemies underwater and the Bullet Bill species' resistance to fire, Torpedo Teds are usually tough, if not invincible enemies and thus must be avoided.

                                                                            History[edit]

                                                                            Super Mario series[edit]

                                                                            Super Mario World[edit]

                                                                            Sprite of a Torpedo Ted in Super Mario World

                                                                            Torpedo Teds first appear in Super Mario World, and they are exclusive to one level in the game: Soda Lake. They are dropped by gloved arms protruding out of Torpedo Bases, the Torpedo Ted equivalent of Bill Blasters. Torpedo Teds move in a straight line, and they are dropped in the direction of where the player is at. Torpedo Teds travel at a relatively quick speed, and they are invincible to most attacks.

                                                                            ROM-hacking has shown that Torpedo Teds can be defeated with thrown objects or a Super Star. However, the sprite of the defeated Torpedo Ted will continue to hurt Mario as it falls off the screen.

                                                                            Super Mario Galaxy[edit]

                                                                            E3 2007 screenshot of Mariobeing chased by Torpedo Teds in Buoy Base Galaxy in Super Mario Galaxy.

                                                                            Torpedo Teds (erroneously referred to as Bullet Bills by Prima Games[1][2]) appear in Super Mario Galaxy after a long absence in the main Super Mario series; they are exclusive to Buoy Base Galaxy and Drip Drop Galaxy, where they are fired from cannons that resemble underwater Bill Blasters. Like the Bullet Bills featured in this game, they home in on players rather than travel in a straight line, but unlike them, they make a beeping noise based on how close they are to Mario. They can be defeated either as Rainbow Mario or by causing them to crash into an object. Torpedo Teds do not reappear in the sequel, Super Mario Galaxy 2.

                                                                            New Super Mario Bros. U / New Super Luigi U / New Super Mario Bros. U Deluxe[edit]

                                                                            Mario encountering Torpedo Teds in New Super Mario Bros. U

                                                                            Torpedo Teds reappear in New Super Mario Bros. U alongside black Torpedo Bases, and they make their only appearances in Larry's Torpedo Castle and the The Mighty Cannonship's Bowser Jr. Battle. They retain their appearance and behavior from Super Mario World, though they are slightly longer, their propellers are red, and the ends holding them are white. The game introduces a Torpedo Ted variation, where red Torpedo Bases launch a red version of Torpedo Teds known as Targeting Teds, which homes in on players in a way similar fashion to the Bullet Bill equivalent, Bull's-Eye Bill. If the player freezes one, it breaks out immediately. Torpedo Teds can be defeated in Boost Mode and Super Boost Mode; in the former case, when it is frozen, the player can tap on the ice block quickly, while in the latter players can defeat Torpedo Teds simply by tapping on them. Also, simply freezing them when another Torpedo Ted is right in front of them will defeat the frozen one.

                                                                            Torpedo Ted reappear in the expansion game, New Super Luigi U. They appear in the first boss battle with Bowser Jr., and in Larry's Trigger-Happy Castle, Torpedo Teds appear with many other varieties of Bullet Bill. They can be seen in the watery areas of the first room.

                                                                            Torpedo Teds also appear as obstacles in the Penguin vs. Torpedo challenge.

                                                                            Super Mario World television series[edit]

                                                                            A Torpedo Ted from the Super Mario Worldcartoon series.

                                                                            A Torpedo Ted, though not specifically named as such, appears in the final episode of the Super Mario World cartoon. In the episode, titled "Mama Luigi," Luigi and Yoshi, after escaping a pursuing Rip Van Fish, are attacked by a Torpedo Ted. This Torpedo Ted chases after them as they are swimming to the surface; however, the Torpedo Ted misses both of them, as they are saved by two friendly Dolphins.

                                                                            Super Princess Peach[edit]

                                                                            A Torpedo Ted from Super Princess Peach

                                                                            Torpedo Teds reside in a few underwater areas of Vibe Island in Super Princess Peach, behaving much as they do in Super Mario World. There is also a variant under the influence of the Vibe Scepter, transforming them into Glad Torpedo Teds.

                                                                            Mario Party series[edit]

                                                                            Mario Party 10[edit]

                                                                            Torpedo Teds make their series debut in Mario Party 10 as an obstacle in Blooper Blastoff. They are fired out from Torpedo Bases, and players must avoid them while they are traversing to the surface. When players hit a Torpedo Ted, they spin out for one second.

                                                                            Super Mario Party[edit]

                                                                            A Torpedo Ted as seen in Super Mario Party

                                                                            A Torpedo Ted appears in Super Mario Party in the minigame Rattle and Hmmm as one of the choices.

                                                                            Gallery[edit]

                                                                            Names in other languages[edit]

                                                                            Language Name Meaning
                                                                            Japaneseトーピード[3][4]
                                                                            Tōpīdo
                                                                            Torpedo
                                                                            Chinese (Simplified)鱼雷杀手[5]
                                                                            Yúléi Shāshǒu
                                                                            鱼雷刺客 (international releases for games since New Super Mario Bros. U Deluxe)
                                                                            Yúléi Cìkè
                                                                            鱼雷先锋 (China release for Nintendo Switch games)
                                                                            Yúléi Xiānfēng
                                                                            From "鱼雷" (yúléi, torpedo) and "弹头杀手" (Dàntóushāshǒu, Bullet Bill)

                                                                            From "鱼雷" (yúléi, torpedo) and "炮弹刺客" (Pàodàncìkè, Bullet Bill)

                                                                            From "鱼雷" (yúléi, torpedo) and "炮弹先锋" (Pàodànxiānfēng, Bullet Bill)

                                                                            Chinese (Traditional)魚雷刺客
                                                                            Yúléi Cìkè
                                                                            From "魚雷" (yúléi, torpedo) and "炮彈刺客" (Pàodàncìkè, Bullet Bill)
                                                                            FrenchTed TorpilleTorpedo Ted
                                                                            GermanTorpedo Ted-
                                                                            ItalianTed TorpedineTorpedo Ted
                                                                            Korean어뢰킬러
                                                                            Eoroe Killeo
                                                                            Torpedo Bullet Bill
                                                                            SpanishTed TorpedoTorpedo Ted

                                                                            Trivia[edit]

                                                                            Sprite sheet featuring Boss Bass and a Bullet Bill-sized version of Torpedo Ted.
                                                                            • During development of Super Mario World, Bullet Bill-sized versions of Torpedo Ted were planned.[6] Additionally, the name "Water Killer" is present in prototype assets.[7]

                                                                            References[edit]

                                                                            1. ^"The warp pipe is encased in a steel-and-glass cage. Fortunately, there is a Bullet Bill torpedo tube nearby." Black, Fletcher. Super Mario Galaxy PRIMA Official Game Guide, page 157.
                                                                            2. ^"A massive weight hangs from the tower’s bottom. This holds the tower in place. Mario must somehow remove the weight. There is a torpedo tube in the side of the sea bowl. Swim over to it to catch the eyes of a Bullet Bill as it blasts into the water. Then, swim toward the weight with the Bullet Bill in tow. Quickly paddle to the weight’s other side so the Bullet Bill crashes into it. The explosion drops the weight, allowing several floating devices to rise. Now Mario can climb to the tower’s top." Black, Fletcher. Super Mario Galaxy PRIMA Official Game Guide, page 158.
                                                                            3. ^Shogakukan. 2015. Super Mario Bros. Hyakka: Nintendo Kōshiki Guidebook, Super Mario World section, page 55.
                                                                            4. ^Shogakukan. 2015. Super Mario Bros. Hyakka: Nintendo Kōshiki Guidebook, Super Mario Galaxy section, page 127.
                                                                            5. ^无敌阿尔宙斯 (August 28, 2013). 神游 超级马力欧世界 敌人官译. Baidu Tieba. Retrieved February 2, 2017.
                                                                            6. ^Verneri Kontto (July 24, 2020). Twitter post featuring prototype Super Mario World assets. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
                                                                            7. ^TCRF. Prerelease:Super Mario World (SNES)/Background Graphics and Tilemaps#Enemy Cast List. The Cutting Room Floor. Retrieved August 6, 2020.
                                                                            Sours: https://www.mariowiki.com/Torpedo_Ted

                                                                            You will also be interested:

                                                                            TeD

                                                                            Zeng "TeD" Zhuo (born June 15, 1988) is a retired ChineseUndead player. After his retirement, he became a caster and a streamer.

                                                                            2v2[edit]

                                                                            TeD still competes at the highest level in 2v2, where he has been very successful together with China  Hainiu. He was previously partnered with China  Fly100%, but they decided to split up due to them lacking a Night Elf.

                                                                            Hainiu & TeD won GCS Fall 2016 - 2on2 Grand Finals in December, 2016.

                                                                            Trivia[edit]

                                                                            • He has been chosen the Most Popular Streamer of the Year in 2019.

                                                                            Weekly Cups[edit]

                                                                            Achievements[edit]

                                                                            Date Placement Tier Tournament Team Result Prize
                                                                            2016-01-23 A11stA1Tier 1Golden Championship SeriesGCS 2015 (2v2)Paired with Check3 : 0 Hainiu and Kingstod$2,282
                                                                            2014-04-29 A33rdA1Tier 1IETInternational e-Sport Tournament 20142 : 0 China  Fly100%$2,402
                                                                            2012-12-02 A11stA1Tier 1World Cyber GamesWorld Cyber Games - 2012World EliteWorld Elite2 : 1 China  Fly100%$10,000
                                                                            2010-11-07 A33rdA1Tier 1WEMWorld e-Sports Masters 2010World EliteWorld Elite0 : 1 South Korea  Lyn$4,000
                                                                            2010-04-11 A11stA2Tier 2Nvidia Game Festival 2010World EliteWorld Elite2 : 1 South Korea  Moon$2,500
                                                                            2009-01-12 A11stA1Tier 1WC3LWarCraft III Champions League - Season XIV
                                                                            World Elite: TeD, Sky, SuhO, Like, Infi.
                                                                            3 : 2 SK GamingSK Gaming$2,000
                                                                            2008-10-25 A11stA1Tier 1Make Games ColorfulMake Games Colorful - 2008World EliteWorld Elite2 : 1 China  Fly100%$10,257
                                                                            2008-08-27 A33rdA1Tier 1ESWCESWC 2008World EliteWorld Elite2 : 0 South Korea  ReiGn$4,000
                                                                            2008-05-03 A11stA1Tier 1Road of the KingRoad of the King
                                                                            World Elite: TeD, Sky, SuhO, Like, Infi.
                                                                            5 - 4 SK GamingSK Gaming$2,000
                                                                            2007-09-23 A11stA2Tier 2PPstreamPPstreamPPStream CN vs KR S2 (1v1)World EliteWorld Elite3 : 2 China  Sky$4,010
                                                                            About achievementsComplete Results in any Tournament

                                                                            External links[edit]

                                                                            Profiles[edit]

                                                                            Interviews[edit]

                                                                            • 2006
                                                                            • 2009
                                                                            • 2012
                                                                            • 2013
                                                                            • 2014
                                                                            • 2017
                                                                            • 2018
                                                                            • 2019
                                                                            • Show All

                                                                            References[edit]

                                                                            Sours: https://liquipedia.net/warcraft/TeD


                                                                            1489 1490 1491 1492 1493