Meaning of armourer

Meaning of armourer DEFAULT

armourer

A Serpent in the course of its wanderings came into an armourer's shop.

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At about the centre of the oaken panels that lined the hall was suspended a suit of mail, not, like the pictures, an ancestral relic, but of the most modern date; for it had been manufactured by a skilful armourerin London, the same year in which Governor Bellingham came over to New England.

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Phil Squod, with his smoky gunpowder visage, at once acts as nurse and works as armourerat his little table in a corner, often looking round and saying with a nod of his green-baize cap and an encouraging elevation of his one eyebrow, "Hold up, my boy!

View in context

The smiths and armourers on palfreys ride, Files in their hands, and hammers at their side; And nails for loosen'd spears, and thongs for shields provide.

The northern access to the lists terminated in a similar entrance of thirty feet in breadth, at the extremity of which was a large enclosed space for such knights as might be disposed to enter the lists with the challengers, behind which were placed tents containing refreshments of every kind for their accommodation, with armourers, tarriers, and other attendants, in readiness to give their services wherever they might be necessary.

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It was the head of one of Mendana's armourers, lost in a beach scrimmage to one of Bashti's remote ancestors.

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Those earlier remanded were Issahaku Yakubu Kambo-Naa, leader of the criminal group and self acclaimed fetish priest, Nashiru Mahama Nana, a civilian employee driver/mechanic at the Airborne Force (ABF) of the Ghana Army, alleged to have supplied some military accoutrements to the fetish priest, Anas Kampolla, Zuka Abdela, the youth said to be the armourerand responsible for receiving and issuing of arms and ammunitions for attacks.

More suspected killers of Policewoman smoked out

The .44 calibre lead-cast bullets used to kill Myers were forensically linked by National Ballistics Intelligence Service (NABIS) experts to the bullet moulds at the Gloucester home of corrupt armourerPaul Edmunds, 66.

A dangerous man with notorious history of violence'

Sours: //www.thefreedictionary.com/

armourer

The smiths and armourers on palfreys ride, Files in their hands, and hammers at their side; And nails for loosen'd spears, and thongs for shields provide.

The northern access to the lists terminated in a similar entrance of thirty feet in breadth, at the extremity of which was a large enclosed space for such knights as might be disposed to enter the lists with the challengers, behind which were placed tents containing refreshments of every kind for their accommodation, with armourers, tarriers, and other attendants, in readiness to give their services wherever they might be necessary.

View in context

It was the head of one of Mendana's armourers, lost in a beach scrimmage to one of Bashti's remote ancestors.

View in context

A Serpent in the course of its wanderings came into an armourer's shop.

View in context

At about the centre of the oaken panels that lined the hall was suspended a suit of mail, not, like the pictures, an ancestral relic, but of the most modern date; for it had been manufactured by a skilful armourerin London, the same year in which Governor Bellingham came over to New England.

View in context

Phil Squod, with his smoky gunpowder visage, at once acts as nurse and works as armourerat his little table in a corner, often looking round and saying with a nod of his green-baize cap and an encouraging elevation of his one eyebrow, "Hold up, my boy!

View in context

Rachel Wong, a PhD student at the University of Sunderland, was runner-up in the the 2015 National Final of the Young Persons' Lecture Competition, at the Armourers' Hall, in London.

Student's young lecturer accolade

Sours: //www.thefreedictionary.com/
  1. Sprinter van suspension
  2. Wv yorkies
  3. River house decorations

Armourer

For the type of smith, see Blacksmith. For the role on a film crew, see Weapons master. For the Star Wars character, see The Armorer.

Historically, an armourer is a person who makes personal armour, especially plate armour. In modern terms, an armourer is a member of a military or police force who works in an armoury and maintains and repairs small arms and weapons systems, with some duties resembling those of a civilian gunsmith. There is increasing evidence that companies specializing in the manufacture of armoured vehicles or applique armour for application onto vehicles of all types (cars, boats, aircraft) are referring to themselves as armourers; such as the UK company OVIK Crossway - which describes its services as Armourers and Coach Builders. In some ways, this is a reversion back to the original meaning of the term insofar as these companies forge, adapt or integrate physical armour onto platforms in order to protect human life.

The title is also used in Olympic sport of fencing (the foil, the épée and the sabre) to refer to those who repair fencers' weaponry, safety equipment, fencing-strips, scoring machines, and reels. At sport-fencing events, the individuals responsible for checking equipment safety and maintaining the strips, reels and scoring machines during the tournament are also known as armourers.[citation needed]

With the renewed interest in traditional armour and weaponry the occupation also involves working with film, stage, and historical and reenactment societies. Period costumes may require reproduction armour, swords, and related equipment. The HEMA (Historical European Martial Arts) movement has also revived a more traditional expression of armoury as a skill.

United Kingdom[edit]

Armourers are the oldest trade in the British Army and trace their heritage back several centuries. Today they form a core role within the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME) and work on an extremely wide variety of weapon systems. Typically, armourers are attached to every type of front line operational unit within the British Army such as Infantry, Cavalry, Engineers, Logistics, Special Forces and specialist training teams. They can also be found in larger REME units called REME Battalions providing in-depth repair and front line support.

Armourers have the rank of Craftsman upon starting their trade training, which is the equivalent of Private and they have similar ranks of the remainder of the Army thereafter. As they increase in rank they can follow one of two streams: Artisan or Artificer. As an Artificer they must complete a strenuous Selection course and then attend an 18-month intensive engineering course where they work towards and gain an electrical and mechanical HND, upon completion they emerge as a Staff Sergeants (SSGT) and have the potential to reach Warrant Officer Class 1 (WO1) as an Artificer Sergeant Major (ASM) or even gain a Commission. Artisan Armourers who remain working at trade can also achieve Warrant Officer Class 1 (WO1) typically as a Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) of a REME Battalion and potentially gain a Late Entry (LE) commission.

On a day-to-day basis Armourers maintain a wide variety of weapons and optical equipment, they are highly skilled in the use of hand tools and are able to maintain their equipment across the globe. They formally inspect every weapon annually/or every six months (dependent on weapon type) and also advise the end-user on all matters of equipment care. Within a modern Infantry Battalion, they are exposed to the maximum varieties of weapons and optical equipment, with only Special Forces possessing more.

Within the British Royal Air Force (RAF), armourers are considered the most specialized of any trade in the RAF, but they hold a qualification for each specific weapon rather than gaining every qualification for all small arms and larger weapon systems. After spending an initial phase of generic training at RAF Halton with the majority other non commissioned trainees they transfer to DCAE Cosford for their trade-specific training. Once qualified they can find themselves employed on a wide variety of tasks, including non-trade-specific jobs such as the flight line servicing of aircraft. As well as prepping, maintaining and loading aircraft bombs, missiles and aircraft assisted escape systems, they are also responsible for the maintenance of explosive release systems and small arms within station armouries like the L85A2 (SA80), 9mm Glock 17 pistol and the GPMG (General Purpose Machine Gun). They can also work alongside the British ArmyAmmunition Technician, Royal Engineers, and Royal NavyClearance Divers, in an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) role able to deal with improvised explosive devices and conventional weapons. The founder of the RAF, Lord Trenchard, held armourers in high esteem, saying "without armament, there is no Air Force." Within RAF squadrons armourers are colloquially known as "pin-monkeys" and, more commonly, "Plumbers". The term "Plumber" has several origins, but it most likely stems from the maintenance of the gun turrets on heavy bombers. The turrets were hydraulically and electrically powered and contained pipework hence the reference to Plumbers.

Ireland[edit]

Irish Army armourers are the technicians who are responsible for the inspection, maintenance, and repair of all service weapons. These include rifles, light machine guns, pistols, recoilless weapons, heavy machine guns, mortars, and associated equipment, including APC turrets, field kitchens. Personal battle equipment such as helmet, webbing, and respirator also fall within their responsibilities.

Their training takes a minimum of four years, where for the first three years they serve an apprenticeship to qualify as a fitter/turner and their final year is training within the ordnance school to become armourers. Following a minimum of 5 years of mechanical work experience within an ordnance unit and reaching NCO rank they can be selected then go onto further training to become what is known as an Armament Artificer or AA, this training takes a minimum of 5 months.

An Artificer is responsible for advanced maintenance and service inspection of heavy caliber weapons (Artillery, Anti-aircraft, Cavalry main armament, shipborne weapons).

They are part of the Ordnance Corps, which is the only corps of the Irish Army which due to the technical expertise and training required of its members, does not have an Irish reserve force subsidiarity.

Individual line soldiers within an army infantry battalion are responsible for daily cleaning of their individual weapons, both the armourers and artificers (also known by their unofficial title of "tiffies") maintain both internal and external components and structural integrity of all components of the weapon system by periodical inspection and gauging.

Sighting, missile and robotic systems are maintained by technicians known as armament artificers instrument or AAI. These technicians also serve a four-year apprenticeship and qualify as electrical science engineers.

Weapons that do not pass the armourers' or artificers' inspection are withdrawn from service to be repaired or destroyed. Ordnance personnel are expected to be proficient soldiers and will receive the same amount of training as line soldiers.

They are on occasion expected to participate fully in ceremonial and operational duties and their rank structure is determined by the branch of the military they serve in for example Army- Private, Corporal, and so on.[1]

Australia[edit]

In a response to the disastrous unloading of the Idomeneus ship in January 1943 — where a wharf labourer died and many others were badly gassed by mustard gas leaking from a drum — the Royal Australian Air Force created a specialist unit, the Chemical Warfare Armourers. Their role was to handle, maintain and move upwards of 1,000,000 chemical weapons imported into Australia to counter a possible Japanese threat.

United States[edit]

The title "armorer" was formerly part of several Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) designations across the services. Even where the title has disappeared, those with duties similar to those of earlier armourers are often referred to as such.

At present, the U.S. Army does not have a Military Occupational Specialty of "armourer". At the unit level, an armourer duty position exists and is filled by soldiers holding the Unit Supply Specialist (92Y) MOS; these soldiers will have received some basic armourer training as part of their MOS training, and will often attend further armourer training when assigned to that duty position. Many of the traditional functions of an armourer are performed by a separate MOS, Small Arms Repairer (MOS 91F, formerly 45B), which performs higher levels of ordnance maintenance and repair.

Notable armourers[edit]

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armourer
How To Say Armourer

Meaning of armourer in English:

armourer

Pronunciation /ˈɑːmərə/

noun

(USarmorer)

  • 1A maker, supplier, or repairer of weapons or armour.

    ‘The protection and embellishment of the warrior's head has preoccupied warriors themselves, as well as their armourers and hatters, since the earliest history of organized warfare.’

    • ‘Maryland tried to preserve its militia's arms by employing an armorer, Isaac Miller, who also served as an arms dealer, purchasing guns in England for several colonies.’
    • ‘In Europe armourers have invariably been workers in metal, but in other parts of the world materials such as wickerwork, bone, and coconut fibre have been used.’
    • ‘It is possible to order armour from armourers in the North Island and overseas, but much of the armour is home made, hammered out and welded together.’
    • ‘Irons could have been made by blacksmiths or armorers, but are more likely the work of toolmakers.’
    • ‘We've got a welder and fitter / armourer here, the welder does repairs if there's any cracks in the vehicle.’
    • ‘Similar laws were issued regarding armorers, masters of the Imperial mints, and so on.’
    • ‘There was no discussion, then or thereafter, but on every subsequent assignment the armorer had supplied weaponry with the same internal modification.’
    • ‘Spurred by military target competition and by practical shooting three-gun matches, armorers and gunmakers unlocked the AR's accuracy potential.’
    • ‘Even the owner is urged not to disassemble the Crossfire if there's a problem, but to have it serviced by the Customer Service Department, a trained armorer or qualified gunsmith.’
    • ‘The 773-page compilation resurrects St. George, the dragon-slayer who was slain himself at Lydda in Palestine around 303 A.D. and is the patron of soldiers, knights, archers and armorers.’
    • ‘Each MEU 1911.45 Automatic pistol is hand-built by specially trained armorers in the Precision Weapons Section, Quantico, Virginia.’
    • ‘Marine armorers from the Precision Weapons Section, MCBQ, are building the guns.’
    • ‘His helmet required some minor repairs, and while the armorer at the castle could tend to it, he preferred to take his custom to a man who needed it more.’
    • ‘At the Ashby tournament, attended by Prince John, tents accommodated participating knights, plus armourers and farriers.’
    • ‘As any gunsmith or S&W armorer can attest, these guns - like any semiautomatic pistol - require lubrication of their long bearing surfaces or they may be unable to cycle as designed.’
    • ‘Did you or a staff member attend an armorer's course or go to a big trade show?’
    • ‘Nuremberg supported an exceptionally dynamic community of metalworkers ranging from renowned armourers, such as Valentin Siebenbürger and Kunz Lochner, to bronze and brass casters to goldsmiths.’
    • ‘Public buildings were stoned and a group of young people tried to break into armourers ' premises on the Pont Saint-Michel, saying that they must have guns to use against the police.’
    • ‘None rose to the challenge with greater distinction than the armourers of northern Italy who had been the international leaders in their craft from at least the fourteenth century.’
  • 2An official in charge of the arms of a warship or regiment.

    ‘Sarah Povey, whose husband Sion, a Lance Corporal, is an armourer, said: ‘The Queen asked how I coped with separation and I told her you get used to it but that didn't make it any easier.’’

    • ‘A sergeant then, he was Yellow Oboe's armorer and ball turret gunner.’
    • ‘There was an abundance of volunteers who needed to be trained in the ways of the military and become transformed into competent pilots, navigators, armourers, and support staff.’
    • ‘Mr Tolan's distinguished career began on his 18th birthday in 1941 when he joined the RAF and became a ground-crew armourer for 102 Squadron at the Topcliffe and Dalton bases in North Yorkshire.’
    • ‘The armorer who looked after weapons couldn't walk; he was on crutches.’
    • ‘Talk to any Bomber Command veteran and within a few minutes they will be singing the praises of the ground crew - the fitters, engineers, mechanics and armourers.’
    • ‘A major change in weapons labelling means that soldiers checking when their rifle or pistol is due for inspection will no longer have to call the unit armourer or dig out the weapon log from the armoury.’
    • ‘Charles Smith, the armorer, had spent the night ensuring that the vehicles' main weapon systems, .50-caliber machine guns and Mkl9 grenade launchers, were 100 percent ready.’
    • ‘Training for the weapon operators and armourers is under way and the performance of the weapon will be monitored during its initial service.’
    • ‘Gunsmiths can be ex-machinists, ex-military armorers or other craftsmen who were gunsmithing at home as a hobby for their own entertainment and for friends.’
    • ‘Like the Maytag repairman, the unit armorer must have been one bored fellow.’
    • ‘Initially, these were mostly ground crews, the mechanics, armourers, meteorological and intelligence officers, and even a padre who make up the running of an effective operating station.’
    • ‘Dozens of men: mechanics, pilots, armourers, dashed about the great wooden deck of the Hiryu.’
    • ‘The next day Willow was taken to the blacksmith and the armourer.’
    • ‘Being tasked to be the armorer probably saved my life.’
    • ‘For all but the commando version, the barrels can be changed by the unit armorer (with some special tools.)’
    • ‘The armorer was told not to let anyone know the optics were even in the armsroom.’
    • ‘Miller was an armorer for the Army Marksmanship Unit who taught Vickers how to fit a barrel - the old fashioned way - slow, deliberate, no jigs or fixtures, just skillful handwork.’

Origin

Middle English from Old French armurier, from armure (see armour).

Sours: https://www.lexico.com/definition/armourer

Of armourer meaning

armourer

USarmorer


noun

a person who makes or mends arms and armour

a person employed in the maintenance of small arms and weapons in a military unit

QUIZ

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We could talk until we're blue in the face about this quiz on words for the color "blue," but we think you should take the quiz and find out if you're a whiz at these colorful terms.

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Words nearby armourer

Armory Show, armour, armour-bearer, armoured, armoured car, armourer, armour plate, armoury, armpad, armpatch, armpit

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

How to use armourer in a sentence

  • Here it was that, by the King's command, the master armourer made Jeanne a suit of mail.

    The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2)|Anatole France

  • Georg, the father of Lorenz, was well established as an armourer when he was joined in 1467 by his famous son.

    Armour in England|J. Starkie Gardner

  • The latter listened to the discovery that had been made, and then asked the armourer what he advised should be done.

    Wulf the Saxon|G. A. Henty

Sours: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/armourer
Minecraft Armorer Trades Explained

A spark appeared in her eyes, eyes squinted like a fox. - If, as old good friends, then you can - Then I went I did not want to go to the Light. But suddenly. I wanted to hold my strength until tomorrow.

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And I handed her one. Toma poured alcohol to the top of one mug, and plain water from a plastic bottle into the other. We look - she first gives the girl a mug of alcohol and says to her: - Breathe in, breathe out, quickly.



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